It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Flat Earthers - Here is your answer ?

page: 2
31
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 09:22 AM
link   
a reply to: Rosinitiate

That isn't the same thing as the traditional Flat Earth theory.




posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 09:26 AM
link   

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Rosinitiate

That isn't the same thing as the traditional Flat Earth theory.


But what if our entire universe was a flat film and everything we experience is a projection? If the universe is flat than surely our world is too.

I agree though, it's not the same thing as visualizing a world that ends at the waters other edge. Or how pissed I would be if My planet lived under yours and all your Fukushima oceans kept dumping into my garden!



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 09:27 AM
link   

originally posted by: Bilk22

originally posted by: superman2012
They can also solve this "riddle" by observing the moon as Earth's shadow shows up on it...

Grade 3 science experiment proves them wrong, but they still insist...
How come the moon's shadow isn't cast upon the Earth during a new moon phase? Shouldn't there be a big black shadow on the Earth from the moon being positioned between the Earth and the sun?

www.kidseclipse.com...

( I found a kids site to better explain this since it's something we all learned as kids)




Also why don't we see a large black circle in the sky when the moon is new?



You do have a big black circle in the sky when the moon is new. Sadly, the backdrop is also black so there is that.

ETA:
Oh, and the moon is not made of cheese.
edit on 6-7-2015 by network dude because: added pertinent factoid.



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 09:27 AM
link   
a reply to: Bilk22

again - do you understand what an eclipse is ?

further - do you actually know what the moons orbit is ?

as you either cannot or will not understand the above concepts - here is a " pretty picture "



thats why new moon doesnt normally cast its shadow on earth

get it ?



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 09:39 AM
link   
a reply to: network dude

If the Moon isn't made of cheese, what does the "man on the moon" eat?



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 09:40 AM
link   
a reply to: Bilk22

Wikipedia is your friend..


Because the orbit of the Moon is inclined only about 5° to the ecliptic and the Sun is always very near the ecliptic, eclipses always occur on or near it. Because of the inclination of the Moon's orbit, eclipses do not occur at every conjunction and opposition of the Sun and Moon, but only when the Moon is near an ascending or descending node at the same time it is at conjunction or opposition. The ecliptic is so named because the ancients noted that eclipses only occurred when the Moon crossed it.


en.m.wikipedia.org...

The ancients worked it out, and they didn't have google!


edit on 6/7/15 by Chadwickus because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 09:45 AM
link   
Oh, the joy of another flat earth thread...or is that another earth flat thread? Laz may or may not participate...



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 09:47 AM
link   

originally posted by: KawRider9
a reply to: network dude

If the Moon isn't made of cheese, what does the "man on the moon" eat?


Mcdonalds. Duh.



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 09:48 AM
link   

originally posted by: Rosinitiate

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Rosinitiate

That isn't the same thing as the traditional Flat Earth theory.


But what if our entire universe was a flat film and everything we experience is a projection? If the universe is flat than surely our world is too.


It's a possibility, but that is a discussion for another thread. Namely a holographic universe thread.


I agree though, it's not the same thing as visualizing a world that ends at the waters other edge. Or how pissed I would be if My planet lived under yours and all your Fukushima oceans kept dumping into my garden!


It could be a giant disc that sits on the backs of four (maybe five) elephants that stand on the back of a giant turtle that wonders the cosmos.



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 09:48 AM
link   
a reply to: ignorant_ape

note -- the above pic is not to scale or orrientation- see :

source



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 09:52 AM
link   

originally posted by: Bilk22
How come the moon's shadow isn't cast upon the Earth during a new moon phase? Shouldn't there be a big black shadow on the Earth from the moon being positioned between the Earth and the sun? Also why don't we see a large black circle in the sky when the moon is new?



Your picture isn't helping you out much on this because you're looking at an eclipse in that picture, not a new moon.

Rotate that moon on to the other side of the earth first because only the side of the earth facing dark space is looking at the moon as visible. You don't see the moon or anything else in space while looking from the side of the earth where the sun is at.

Now, what you'd have is the earth shadowing the moon from the sun.

In your picture you are either blocking the sun with the moon, an eclipse. Or on the other side of the earth, you are looking at empty night sky with no moon. Get it???



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 09:54 AM
link   

originally posted by: Bilk22

originally posted by: superman2012

originally posted by: Bilk22

originally posted by: superman2012
a reply to: Bilk22


Here you go.
So you're saying that a new moon isn't between the earth and the sun? Please explain.

lol
I found it very hard to believe that you read that whole page and then back here with that question in as little time as it has been.
So you have no answer? I see.


READING can be your friend.
I have given you all the information that you will need in order to glean some knowledge for yourself, don't be afraid to use it to better yourself.



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 09:58 AM
link   

originally posted by: Chadwickus
a reply to: Bilk22

Wikipedia is your friend..


Because the orbit of the Moon is inclined only about 5° to the ecliptic and the Sun is always very near the ecliptic, eclipses always occur on or near it. Because of the inclination of the Moon's orbit, eclipses do not occur at every conjunction and opposition of the Sun and Moon, but only when the Moon is near an ascending or descending node at the same time it is at conjunction or opposition. The ecliptic is so named because the ancients noted that eclipses only occurred when the Moon crossed it.


en.m.wikipedia.org...

The ancients worked it out, and they didn't have google!

And that explains exactly what? 5°makes a difference? Oh yeah there's the moon's "wobble" too, giving us solar eclipses. Guess nothing is perfect.



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 10:01 AM
link   
a reply to: xuenchen

If it's good enough for Bruce Jenner then I think it's got legs .My old Italian friend would say Shees a Round and a flat .



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 10:01 AM
link   

originally posted by: mojom

originally posted by: Bilk22
How come the moon's shadow isn't cast upon the Earth during a new moon phase? Shouldn't there be a big black shadow on the Earth from the moon being positioned between the Earth and the sun? Also why don't we see a large black circle in the sky when the moon is new?



Your picture isn't helping you out much on this because you're looking at an eclipse in that picture, not a new moon.

Rotate that moon on to the other side of the earth first because only the side of the earth facing dark space is looking at the moon as visible. You don't see the moon or anything else in space while looking from the side of the earth where the sun is at.

Now, what you'd have is the earth shadowing the moon from the sun.

In your picture you are either blocking the sun with the moon, an eclipse. Or on the other side of the earth, you are looking at empty night sky with no moon. Get it???
Well I didn't make that diagram. It is a diagram explaining a new moon just as it states. So during a new moon the earth casts a shadow upon the moon but not vice versa. I see.

edit on 66904Mondayk22 by Bilk22 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 10:04 AM
link   
a reply to: Bilk22

Yes that 5 degrees is why we don't get eclipses every new moon.

It's that simple.



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 10:05 AM
link   
a reply to: Bilk22

Not exactly. Earth shadow over moon is a lunar eclipse. Sorry, that was a bit confusing.

You still have to be looking at the night sky though. Not in line with the sun like that 2D picture is showing. At least that is what I think is confusing you. Maybe I'm wrong. But those diagrams don't really explain it well.



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 10:12 AM
link   
a reply to: Bilk22

Are you disagreeing with this science involved in explaining your question?



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 10:16 AM
link   
a reply to: Bilk22

err NO - the earth ONLY casts its shadow on the moon during a lunar eclipse



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 10:19 AM
link   
You also need to think about this in 3d and remember that we rotate once a day and the moon around us takes 29 days. So what you're seeing is how it looks in relation to the sun shining off of it, but that 2d picture makes it look weird.

Think about it like this. On night one the moon is full so you are on the dark side of the earth looking at the moon in full reflection. Now speed up about a week. Everything is in the same position except the moon is now to the right side of earth. You are still on the dark side of the earth looking at it. Think of a pool ball with the stripes on it and how it looks if it is directly in front of you with the number facing you so you can see the line. Now off to your right you can see the line and just part of the number as it curves around the side.




top topics



 
31
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join