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I Saw the Movie "Compliance" Last Night

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posted on Jul, 5 2015 @ 03:34 PM
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I see the actual events the movie was based on have been discussed on this website. Strip Search phone call scams

The movie IMDB

I had fofrgotten about the news story and watched a TYT segment discussing the movie last night and went and found the movie.

After I watched the movie and re watched the ABC news coverage, I began to have the idea that this may have been government sponsored.

-It hapened about 70 times.

-The perpetrator used prepaid phone cards and I think, at the time, these cards would have bankrupted the average person even if half of these calls lasted 2+ hours.

-The attorney for the defendant, kept stating "my client is a fall guy". An attorney ahas to come up with something, I know. David Stewart, a security guard who had completed police academy training was acquited at trial.

-Police searched his home. They found guns and police training manuals. They pointed this out like a bad thing, but Stewart had in fact been through academy training, had volunteered as an officer at a small-town Florida police force. They never mentioned if the guns were lawfully in his posession or not.

-Upon a second seaarch, police 'miraculously' found a phone card used to call one of the fast food restaurants at on time, they stated.
There were no voice recordings and fuzzy surveillance photos.

The calls stopped after the trial. One may say it is because David Stewart didn't want to risk getting caught, but people who do these things can't normally stop. If it was a government operation, they may have decided to shut it down so no one dug any deeper the next time.

On a side note, I was horrified at the actions of the people involved. The manager, Donna Summers, sued McDonalds and won 100,000 comensatory damage and 1 million punitive-the idea being that McDonalds shoud have warned about this scam more- they did warn, The Manager of the articular store never passed on a corporate voicemail and it was in their training manual. This was even after she entered an Alford plea to one count of unlawful imprisonment and received 1 year of probation.
The victim, recveived 6.1 million total, she should have gotten more.
The fiance of Donna Summers was sentenced to 5 years in a plea deal for sexual abuse.
A 27 year old restaurant worker is one that refused to participate, but didn;t actualy do anything to stop it. A 58 year old maintenance worker was the one who refused to comply and complained and caused others to finally wake up and figure out something was wrong.

The so called perpetrator had no psychology background. I don;t think this could have been pulled off by your general sociopath. When I learned it had happened 70 times in multiple states, I began to wonder if the government was testing compliance.




posted on Jul, 5 2015 @ 05:16 PM
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McDonald's and the caller were each found to be 50% at fault. One point the court made was that the victim did not remove herself from the situation, "contrary to common sense".

It's astounding that there were so many idiots that fell for this. What else would you call it? In this one, the victim jumped up and down, exposed herself explicitly, and actually engaged in a sex act! All upon the demands of some person on the phone!

Is there more to this I'm not getting? A person calls, says they're a police officer, asks a manger to strip search an employee... Then what? At what point does that go from "plausible, to a naive and uneducated person" to "completely ridiculous, this is a prank call"?
It happened several times around the country!

And the suspect wasn't convicted, correct?

These incidents were news to me.

a reply to: reldra


edit on 5-7-2015 by kkrattiger because: (no reason given)

edit on 5-7-2015 by kkrattiger because: Wrong info



posted on Jul, 5 2015 @ 05:42 PM
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originally posted by: kkrattiger
McDonald's and the caller were each found to be 50% at fault. One point the court made was that the victim did not remove herself from the situation, "contrary to common sense".

It's astounding that there were so many idiots that fell for this. What else would you call it? In this one, the victim jumped up and down, exposed herself explicitly, and actually engaged in a sex act! All upon the demands of some person on the phone!

Is there more to this I'm not getting? A person calls, says they're a police officer, asks a manger to strip search an employee... Then what? At what point does that go from "plausible, to a naive and uneducated person" to "completely ridiculous, this is a prank call"?
It happened several times around the country!

And the suspect wasn't convicted, correct?

These incidents were news to me.

a reply to: reldra

The victim was 18 years old and still in high school. She was in the top 10 in her class, straight As. I saw one interview with a psychiatrist about 'why did she not leave'. By the point it became horrendous, she was in shock. The mind would have gone into a self preservation mode. Some would run, some would fight, some would just stay there and hope it ended. "Fight or flight" does not necesssarily happen all the time. When I am startled, at times- and to the great laughing delight of some of my friends- I have screamed and dropped to my knees.

The court made no such point- a psychiatrist hired by McDonald's as an expert witness for for over $50,000 made that point.

The Milgram Experiment is one example of how this can go so far. The Stanford Prison Experiment is another experiment. The people in the latter were students at Stanford.

The alleged perpetrator was acquited based on lack of evidence.

Actually it happeded almost 70 times, not just 'several'. So, it was not just 3 or 4 naive people that that were stupid and fell for a gag.
edit on 5-7-2015 by reldra because: (no reason given)


"The Court" would be the judge and the judge had this to say in the victim;s civil trial "Before closing arguments, the judge told the jury that it may return punitive damages against McDonald's Corp. if it acted "in reckless disregard for the safety, security and well-being of others, including Ogborn." The jury did return punitive damages.
edit on 5-7-2015 by reldra because: (no reason given)

source
edit on 5-7-2015 by reldra because: (no reason given)

edit on 5-7-2015 by reldra because: (no reason given)


"The Kentucky Court of Appeals upheld but reduced a punitive award to a McDonald’s manager who was duped into a prank forcing a young worker into a strip search. The punitive award against McDonald’s was reduced from $1 million to $400,000. However, the court let stand the $5 million award of punitive damages for 18-year-old worker who was the subject of the search."Source If it was 1/2 the fault of the victim, the amount would have been reduced. The only amount reduced was for the Manager, who didn;t really deserve a dime and gad been sentenced in the case.
edit on 5-7-2015 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 5 2015 @ 05:59 PM
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I really want to know what happened to David Stewart, after he was acquitted. The news sources say he was married with 5 kids living in Florida at the time of these incidents. Where is he now??! I searched the Internet for 15 mins, but came up with nothin. a reply to: reldra



posted on Jul, 5 2015 @ 06:05 PM
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a reply to: [post=19534829]kkrattiger[/post I have looked for anything else on David Stewart. It was noted that other jurisdictions would have the opportunity to extradite and try him. It never happened. That raises my suspicions even more that it was a government operation.

edit on 5-7-2015 by reldra because: (no reason given)


It seems to end here. "West Bridgewater, Massachusetts detective Sgt. Victor Flaherty testified at Stewart's Kentucky trial. He worked with Kentucky authorities and Bay County investigators to identify Stewart as a suspect.Flaherty told the Massachusetts reporter "It's early in the game, Mr. Stewart should realize this is only the beginning."
edit on 5-7-2015 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 5 2015 @ 06:18 PM
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a reply to: reldra


That raises my suspicions even more that it was a government operation.

What would be the point though, really. Convincing someone to break the law over a phone, lol. That would only work at places like McDonalds.

Somebody had a sort of weird voyeur fetish to get people to "frisk" others. Maybe their phone sex bill was running toohigh.

I'm not really familiar with this case, I could be waaay off on that.

You want weird, weird you get.



posted on Jul, 5 2015 @ 06:30 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: reldra


That raises my suspicions even more that it was a government operation.

What would be the point though, really. Convincing someone to break the law over a phone, lol. That would only work at places like McDonalds.

Somebody had a sort of weird voyeur fetish to get people to "frisk" others. Maybe their phone sex bill was running toohigh.

I'm not really familiar with this case, I could be waaay off on that.

You want weird, weird you get.


It has worked in experiments that I have noted above. One of the cases in this was a grocery store. It happened in 32 states, almost 70 times.
There are a ton of people that work at McDonald's as a 2nd job that are educated and not naive. I worked at a McDonald's for 5 months at the same time I was working for an answering service just after high school to save some money for college. I was not yet 17. I graduated early. Bound for university, early and with a 160 IQ, I am not sure how my 16 year old self or even my 18 year old self would have reacted as the victim. I DO know that I would have found a way to call someone had I saw this happpening to someone else, I have always been like that.

The world is not me though and it definitely is not how the vast majority of ATS members are. I do know we have some food service workers as members that would never fall for this. But we are NOT the world at large.

I don;t believe the government was having a sting operation to cause people to break the law and arrest them. I believe the government wanted to see how many people they could get to comply under color of authority.
edit on 5-7-2015 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 12:35 AM
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There are people who do things like this just for their own amusement. A couple years ago there was a guy who used to do all sorts of prank calls like this. In one, he called people in hotel rooms and convinced them that there was a gas leak in the building, and they needed to use something to smash the windows out in their rooms so they could bring fresh air into the room. It's surprisingly easy to convince people to do things when they think they're talking to an authority figure.
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 03:00 AM
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originally posted by: reldra
I see the actual events the movie was based on have been discussed on this website. Strip Search phone call scams

The movie IMDB

I had fofrgotten about the news story and watched a TYT segment discussing the movie last night and went and found the movie.

After I watched the movie and re watched the ABC news coverage, I began to have the idea that this may have been government sponsored.

-It hapened about 70 times.

-The perpetrator used prepaid phone cards and I think, at the time, these cards would have bankrupted the average person even if half of these calls lasted 2+ hours.

-The attorney for the defendant, kept stating "my client is a fall guy". An attorney ahas to come up with something, I know. David Stewart, a security guard who had completed police academy training was acquited at trial.

-Police searched his home. They found guns and police training manuals. They pointed this out like a bad thing, but Stewart had in fact been through academy training, had volunteered as an officer at a small-town Florida police force. They never mentioned if the guns were lawfully in his posession or not.

-Upon a second seaarch, police 'miraculously' found a phone card used to call one of the fast food restaurants at on time, they stated.
There were no voice recordings and fuzzy surveillance photos.

The calls stopped after the trial. One may say it is because David Stewart didn't want to risk getting caught, but people who do these things can't normally stop. If it was a government operation, they may have decided to shut it down so no one dug any deeper the next time.

On a side note, I was horrified at the actions of the people involved. The manager, Donna Summers, sued McDonalds and won 100,000 comensatory damage and 1 million punitive-the idea being that McDonalds shoud have warned about this scam more- they did warn, The Manager of the articular store never passed on a corporate voicemail and it was in their training manual. This was even after she entered an Alford plea to one count of unlawful imprisonment and received 1 year of probation.
The victim, recveived 6.1 million total, she should have gotten more.
The fiance of Donna Summers was sentenced to 5 years in a plea deal for sexual abuse.
A 27 year old restaurant worker is one that refused to participate, but didn;t actualy do anything to stop it. A 58 year old maintenance worker was the one who refused to comply and complained and caused others to finally wake up and figure out something was wrong.

The so called perpetrator had no psychology background. I don;t think this could have been pulled off by your general sociopath. When I learned it had happened 70 times in multiple states, I began to wonder if the government was testing compliance.



It has already been mentioned but no real psychology education is necessary. If you can convince someone you're an authority figure (which really isn't that hard to do), the majority of people will go along with it. Milgram and Zimbardo proved it. Whoever ultimately made these calls proved it. Politicians as part of a campaign strategy to build consensus prove it. Even courts prove it every day as they call on authority figures to testify to a jury.

I've been using prepaid cell phones for awhile, back at that time they ran around $30 for 200 minutes if I remember right, but they also had roaming charges of 1.5x time if you called outside of your zip code. If each call took an hour and it happened 70 times that's 4200 minutes, plus 1.5x time for 6300 minutes. There was probably atleast 1 new phone for every 5 calls too and those would run around $50 each. So when you add it all up that's $700 in phones, $945 in minutes, and then sales tax, and probably another few cards for minute overages (it's doubtful he used his time up exactly on each phone). So really we're looking at a cost of around $1800 to $1900 to do this. That wouldn't bankrupt someone but it's not cheap either.



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 11:50 AM
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a reply to: Aazadan I sourced Milgram already. Milgram certainly had a psychology background and was running the experiment. So, that does not prove that one does not need a psychology background to do this.



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 12:22 PM
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I had never fully paid attention to this story. After reading more on it, this scared the crap out of me. It is amazing how people will just fall in line to what they think is an authoritative figure, even when they know what is happening is wrong.

I don't think this was just someone who was into some type of fetish/voyeurism. They were trying out their own type of experiments on these people. Scary, scary stuff.




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