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A man performs CPR on a dog

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posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 04:17 PM
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This video is heart wrenching. I feel the woman's pain. I couldn't imagine anything happening to my dogs. Luckily, the guy in the video is able to perform CPR.


The following videos show how to do CPR on dogs.



For more information on how to perform CPR on pets go here and here. I think that this is a skill every pet parent needs to know. There are also places that have classes on pet CPR.




posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 04:22 PM
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Thank you... Great info!
I almost cried. This dog looks just like my dog Elvis!
He's my 90 lb baby.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 04:29 PM
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a reply to: Wetpaint72

You're welcome. I hope that it helps someone.
Elvis is a great name for a dog.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 04:36 PM
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I teach human CPR and would probably attempt this on my pet but, I DO have a question. I didn't hear this addressed in the video, apologies if I missed it...

With human CPR you are to call 911 or get someone else to do that so you know that people with more advanced training are on their way. You are also to call for or get or get someone to retrieve the AED if available.

With pets, are we hoping that the heart will begin to beat again just from our compressions alone? Or is there an emergency number for pets in Texas like 911?



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: TNMockingbird

That's a good question. I didn't hear anything about that on the video either. I guess you'd be on your own. I doubt that there's a number like 911 for animals, as they're considered to be of less value than humans (a view that I don't share). I think that there should be something.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 04:56 PM
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Who the bleep films this? People are freaking awful.

Probably heat stroke, Boxers overheat very easily with the short nose and whatnot.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 04:57 PM
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a reply to: Skid Mark
I do have an emergency vet/ after hours vet numbers in my phone and in my wallet. And a doggie first aid kit. Not sure there are any other options. But maybe after seeing this I may try to find one of those breathing bag things.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 05:00 PM
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a reply to: Wetpaint72

That's a good number to have.
What is usually in a pet first aid kit? Does it include things that are in one intended for humans?



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 05:12 PM
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originally posted by: Skid Mark
a reply to: Wetpaint72

That's a good number to have.
What is usually in a pet first aid kit? Does it include things that are in one intended for humans?


Mostly some of the same stuff, I always make sure I have Benadryl, (elvis had had an incident with a poisonous toad) some ace bandages, gauze...cause band aids don't work. Hydrogen peroxide... It makes dogs throw up( but be sure you want them to throw up) doggie safe wipes, cause they will lick it. Tick pulling tweezers. And I happen to have one of those snap on lamp shade collars...cause of that licking thing.

It's more for convince,so I have all the dog stuff in one area.

Oh...and a thermometer...I know I don't want the one I have to put up the dogs butt in my mouth...yuck!



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 05:19 PM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

I certified for animal CPR....and a form of the Heimlich for pets.

Contact your local city or county emergency management depts for the class...usually free. ANIMALS IN DISASTERS

MS
EMT



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 05:24 PM
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And on a side not, and forgive me for going off topic, but you can get a sticker for your house that lets firefighters know how many and what animals are in the house.

I don't expect them to necessarily risk life and limb for my pet, but it could help. I hear about pets lost in fires all the time.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 05:38 PM
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^ You can get the stickers at your local Humane Society as one source.

Indeed it's a valuable skill. Very happy to hear the dog made it.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 06:27 PM
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a reply to: Wetpaint72

Very handy stuff. I can see where Ace bandages would be a good idea. The regular ones wouldn't stick to fur. Thanks for sharing. Now I'm thinking of putting together one of my own.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 06:28 PM
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a reply to: mysterioustranger

That's a good thing to get certified in. Thanks for sharing the name of the program for others who might want to also get certified.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 06:30 PM
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a reply to: Wetpaint72

I don't think that's off topic, really. I know that when I was a kid they had stickers that they gave to kids at school. The kids would put them on the windows of rooms where people were sleeping. If they don't have them for pets I'm sure that you could make some.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 06:31 PM
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a reply to: dreamingawake

Thanks. I had no idea that there were stickers. Now that I know, I'll get some.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 07:50 PM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

'Welcome sir....for a 3 -4 hr class....for pet lovers....it a must and pretty cool to learn!

Best



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 11:34 PM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

Great video. I think it's important for all pet owners to know how to do this. Keeping calm is the most important thing and sometimes the hardest. You're useless if you can't keep your head on, she was very lucky to have that man there save her pooch.



posted on Jul, 1 2015 @ 12:46 AM
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a reply to: FlySolo

I agree. Keeping a cool head is very important. If you're freaking out like the woman in the video was you wouldn't be able to do a thing.



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