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Southern US Culture and Heritage

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posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 09:38 PM
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originally posted by: Logarock

originally posted by: InverseLookingGlass
a reply to: FyreByrd

Slavery, racial segregation, Jim Crow, intimidation, terrorism, racial birthright, racial purity.

Adherence to those memes in the face of any threat and no matter who suffers. It's a declaration of war.




Why do we find the large majority of radicalized blacks in the North? The North wasn't really kind to blacks when they moved up to work in the years after the war. Look at the northern upheavals of blacks in northern cities and California over the years.


Look at the shells of the inner city in the great north and the failure of the great northern experiment, the great society, the great liberal playgrounds.


This is completely off the subject in this thread - please take it elswhere.




posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 09:39 PM
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originally posted by: Annee

originally posted by: ManBehindTheMask

How these people in SC responded is a shining example of Southern Culture



That is not exclusive to the south.
We've seen people coming together in all of these senseless mass killings ---- all across the country.


yes boston and Ferguson were shining examples of what to do when a racial slight has been percieved to have happened........

If you cant clearly see the huge difference in reaction then you are not being honest.........period
edit on 6/29/2015 by ManBehindTheMask because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 09:46 PM
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originally posted by: NavyDoc


It's quite on topic--you can't rail about the "evils" of one region whilst completely ignoring the similar faults of other regions. It's quite hypocritical. The south is not the only place with racial issues.

If you just want an echo chamber where you can just do a delusionary rant and find any contradiction offensive, fine. However don't predend that you want to have an objective discussion.


Sir (and I use the term loosely) if you cannot see the distinction then it is best that you reframe from committing. Actually reading the OP and constructive posts in this thread might just show you the difference between how people feel about the culture and heritage of their home (in this case the south) and the meanings and subtext assumed by outsiders.

I know how I feel about this issue - but I also know that I'm making assumptions as an outsiders. I want to hear people from the south tell me what it represents to them. This is in no way a race question. For some the personal meaning may include racials components by for many it may not.

You Sir, show disrepect to those willing to share their personal relationship with a symbol by disrupting and diverting the intent and content of this thread.



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 09:47 PM
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Not the subject!!!!



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 09:53 PM
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originally posted by: Drest

originally posted by: Shamrock6
a reply to: FormOfTheLord

Oh look. The young Turks don't know the difference between the battle flag and the national flag.

Intentional or accident?

Probably intentional.


Funny how these Turks have the nerve to talk about racism. Their sick, barbaric nation massacred Armenians and Kurds by the hundreds of thousands in one of the worst genocides of the 20th century. Pathetic hypocrites, especially considering Turkey still actively promotes these sub-human policies towards groups like the Kurds today.

Turks today still actually idolize this part of their history.


I agree on the whole aspect of Turkey still celebrating that part of their history. Or not condemning it. Whatever you want to call it, it's not cool.

But frankly, I don't care that they're talking about it. I care that they're wrong, and probably on purpose. Or that their fact checking is so glaringly, woefully inadequate. But to complain that they're talking about it....well, nobody would ever talk about anything that matters if that was how people operated. Every country has a skeleton or ten in their closet. I don't think declaring a person from that country hypocritical simply for talking about it is really fair. Now if the Turks had gone on air talking about how great the Armenian genocide was, that would be hypocritical.

Just my thoughts on it.



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 10:05 PM
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originally posted by: Asktheanimals
a reply to: DarkStormCrow

Having spent my childhood in NY before moving back to Virginia where I was born I can say that racism is alive and well up in NY but I have seen very little of it here in Virginia. It's been my experience that Northerners are far more racist and bigoted than Southerners.

I applaud you for flying your flag on the occasion of the birthday of Gen John B Gordon. He is another personal hero of mine. If you want to see sacrifice, honor and accomplishment one need look no farther than Gordon. Sadly, most Americans have never even heard of him even though he played a critical role in National Reunification. The men who served with him held in such high regard that he was the President for life of the United Confederate Veterans. I often wonder if men of such courage still exist in today's world or if they were all used up in the Civil War.



Just hit the New York athletic club in Manhattan and let me know how far back you think you've gone. They finally allowed women to be in the lounge area in 2005 or so I believe.

I would agree with your assessment. I worked between Baltimore and NY 3 weeks of every month for 3 years and took the train between when I traveled....I can honest say I saw more racism there than I have ever seen in Atlanta....and I grew up here starting in 1977.



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 10:22 PM
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originally posted by: FyreByrd

originally posted by: Logarock

originally posted by: InverseLookingGlass
a reply to: FyreByrd

Slavery, racial segregation, Jim Crow, intimidation, terrorism, racial birthright, racial purity.

Adherence to those memes in the face of any threat and no matter who suffers. It's a declaration of war.




Why do we find the large majority of radicalized blacks in the North? The North wasn't really kind to blacks when they moved up to work in the years after the war. Look at the northern upheavals of blacks in northern cities and California over the years.


Look at the shells of the inner city in the great north and the failure of the great northern experiment, the great society, the great liberal playgrounds.


This is completely off the subject in this thread - please take it elswhere.



Actually I am answering your question by contrast.



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 11:34 PM
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Honest to god, southerners using manners does not make enough of a cultural rift between N & S to even count. Come on, people. To be completely honest, I've been blown away by more thoughtfulness & manners in the north since we moved last year than I did my entire life in the south. Southerners, by strict comparison, are damned rude people in my experience thus far. Embarrassingly rude. We all say New Yorkers are rude bastards, too, but that's no indication of a culture, is it? So why would the opposite be?

In short, what sums up the southern states is poverty, a little bit of regional food & music uniqueness, climate, and Southern Baptists. The south doesn't really have a cultural identity. Most of the US doesn't have a definable cultural identity. Pockets exist, Amish, Mennonite, Cajun, Creole, but on a grand scale it doesn't. Southerners just tend to be extra-butthurt about it when it's pointed out.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 12:50 AM
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There are good replies in this thread about the cultural aspects


Just chiming in. Born and raised in the South here. The rude ones I ran into were often not from the area. The cultural aspects were borrowed by most of the US or what is know as US culture, from music(country, rock and roll, etc) to food and drinks(sodas, teas) and more. Can't forget the drawl.
edit on 30-6-2015 by dreamingawake because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 07:12 AM
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a reply to: Nyiah

That's not true.

Many parts of the country have their own accents with the region around New Orleans having its own dialect of English.

There are many different cultures and variations on culture all across the country which is why we are supposed to be Constitutional Republic of 50 states. What is a good thing for someone in New York is not a good thing for someone in Mississippi and vice versa.

You wouldn't argue that the countries of Europe have different cultures and many of them are smaller or the same size as our various states.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 08:48 AM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

Without reading all the subsequent posts, I submit it's not an easy answer. I am 63, New York City born and have lived around the US, and in Florida since '79.
I remember growing up, through school, when it came to the civil war it was "we won", "down" South, those red necks, etc. Once you come down here and decide to stay and live amongst the "natives"...state born...it's more of a feeling. Sure, manners are taught everywhere, respect. But there's more of a superiority feeling in the north. Most of southern people are more open, friendlier. That's not to say that southern people aren't cautious around northerners. Guess that's from the carpetbagger days.
Florida is a little different than what I call the true south, although Fl. was the 3rd state to secede. It's more of a melting pot today of a lot of displaced Yankees such as myself. Texas is also different. Lived there for two years and after a while, you get this "feeling" is individuality. You still get a feeling of being "it's own country".
Southern pride, southern culture? Cautious but open, friendly, simple, live and let live, but don't try to kick them in the shins...they/we will fight back.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 09:49 AM
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a reply to: Nyiah

agreed. i grew up in the south.
now im in the north.
only thing different is the weather.

manners, hospitality, and sweet tea is not exclusive to the south.

all the foods mentioned i can get here in the north. same with the music.
people up here say please and thank you.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 04:00 PM
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originally posted by: fldinosaur
a reply to: FyreByrd

Without reading all the subsequent posts, I submit it's not an easy answer. I am 63, New York City born and have lived around the US, and in Florida since '79.
I remember growing up, through school, when it came to the civil war it was "we won", "down" South, those red necks, etc. Once you come down here and decide to stay and live amongst the "natives"...state born...it's more of a feeling. Sure, manners are taught everywhere, respect. But there's more of a superiority feeling in the north. Most of southern people are more open, friendlier. That's not to say that southern people aren't cautious around northerners. Guess that's from the carpetbagger days.
Florida is a little different than what I call the true south, although Fl. was the 3rd state to secede. It's more of a melting pot today of a lot of displaced Yankees such as myself. Texas is also different. Lived there for two years and after a while, you get this "feeling" is individuality. You still get a feeling of being "it's own country".
Southern pride, southern culture? Cautious but open, friendly, simple, live and let live, but don't try to kick them in the shins...they/we will fight back.


Thank you for sharing your, rather, extensive experience.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 04:06 PM
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originally posted by: Mugly
a reply to: Nyiah

agreed. i grew up in the south.
now im in the north.
only thing different is the weather.

manners, hospitality, and sweet tea is not exclusive to the south.

all the foods mentioned i can get here in the north. same with the music.
people up here say please and thank you.



So you don't particularly feel sentimental about the ambience of the south that many others have expression in this thread.

This thread got me remebering my mother - born and raised in West Virgina, not the deep south, but she (and my family before I was born) lived in Georgia for several years. I recall her speaking of the 'smell of the mornings', that nothing else in the world (and during her life she lived in many places) was as fine as that smell.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 04:34 PM
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originally posted by: Mugly
a reply to: Nyiah

agreed. i grew up in the south.
now im in the north.
only thing different is the weather.

manners, hospitality, and sweet tea is not exclusive to the south.

all the foods mentioned i can get here in the north. same with the music.
people up here say please and thank you.



I agree, none are exclusive to the south, but from working in the north for 3 years I can say they are nowhere near as prevalent.

While sweet tea can be found, 80% of the time I had to put my own sugar in tea. Sure you can get all of these things in the north but you have to find them.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 04:37 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

i dont feel sentimental at all.

the thing i notice most is the different industries from north to south



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 04:38 PM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe

i dont know.
the only thing i can not find super easy that i can down south is boiled peanuts.
of course some of the seafood is easier to come by, cheaper, and fresher.

other than that, i can get all my southern staples up here.

is sweet tea that big of a deal?



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 04:44 PM
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originally posted by: Mugly
a reply to: Vasa Croe

i dont know.
the only thing i can not find super easy that i can down south is boiled peanuts.
of course some of the seafood is easier to come by, cheaper, and fresher.

other than that, i can get all my southern staples up here.

is sweet tea that big of a deal?


LOL...boiled peanuts....yep. I hadn't thought of those. Never looked for them when I was up there but I can walk to the corner 300yds from my house here and have 2 veggie stands to get them from.

And sweet tea is only a big deal when I want my tea sweet. I have given up asking for it outside the south so it's not that big of a deal, but it would be a real strange thing if you walked into any store or restaurant here and they didn't have it.



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 04:50 PM
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originally posted by: Mugly
a reply to: Nyiah

agreed. i grew up in the south.
now im in the north.
only thing different is the weather.

manners, hospitality, and sweet tea is not exclusive to the south.

all the foods mentioned i can get here in the north. same with the music.
people up here say please and thank you.



Yeah, no sh*t. Just like you can get Chinese food and Chinese music in the "north", just like you can get Mexican food and Mexican music there. What was your point again?
edit on 30-6-2015 by Drest because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2015 @ 04:50 PM
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I grew up in Cleveland and moved to NC when I was 20. I have been here for 27 years now. I love it here. The culture, the food, the weather, the people, just everything about is welcoming. Having a family take you in and show you their way of living will open your eyes. Eating cat head biscuits with sausage gravy, fried green tomatoes, grits, oh yea baby. Going to church on Sunday and coming to Mama's house for Sunday dinner after is dare I say, more spiritual than church was. Sneaking out to the shed and sipping on some home made wine we weren't supposed to drink. Going squirrel hunting on a Saturday morning and knowing that you get to eat a fantastic meal that some might wrinkle their nose at is amazing.

I identified with the "redneck culture". Trust me when I say, that isn't a derogatory term here. It's the way you live. Treat everyone with the respect you hope to receive. GO cut the neighbors grass because they have been feeling a bit sick this week. I realize this can all happen everywhere, but it's just how this place runs.

I can drive 2 hours to the foothills, and 1.5 hours to the beach. Aside from not being AT the beach all the time, this is close to heaven.

But it's nice and quiet now, so if you are thinking of moving down here, don't. Florida is better.




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