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When players are 'playing deep' in Football and Aussie Rules

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posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 11:14 PM
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I noticed that when players are said to be playing deep in soccer, that means the player is playing more up the field away from goals. Yet, in Aussie Rules when someone is playing deep it means they are playing more closer to goals. So they totally contradict each other. So who is technically correct in this instance?




posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 12:29 AM
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a reply to: croatianguy

On the contrary, in the UK at least. Playing "deep" means playing near to your own goal, whereas playing "high" (a slightly less commonly-used term) means playing more towards the opposition goal - the goal you are attacking. This seems to be the same as how you have described Aussie Rules football.



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 12:34 AM
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a reply to: lacrimoniousfinale

Well, I am referring to the goal that both of them are attacking, so I am referring to the forwards in both games.
So really, in Aussie Rules they should be saying high instead of deep then right?
edit on 29-6-2015 by croatianguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 12:59 AM
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a reply to: croatianguy

If one of us is using "goal" to mean the goal the team is defending and one of us is using it to mean the goal the team is attacking, then things are going to get confusing.

"Goal" in my explanation above means the goal the team is defending. Playing "deep" means playing defensively, near to the goal you are defending. This is in contrast to a team or player adopting a more attacking stance, who are said to be playing "high". In this instance, players will generally be positioned further "up" the pitch, nearer to the goal they are attacking.

Wikipedia explains it very well:

Deep: used to describe the positioning of a player (or a line of players, such as the defence or midfield) who is playing closer to their own goal than they traditionally would. A defence may drop deep against a team with fast attacking players, to reduce the amount of space behind the defence for fast-paced players to break into. Attacking players who traditionally play deep may be described as being a deep-lying forward or a deep-lying playmaker.

It's not for me to tell Australians what they should be saying when describing their own game.



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 01:15 AM
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a reply to: lacrimoniousfinale

Thanks for that. Yeah it seems Australians are wrong and should be saying "high". They always say, now such and such is playing deep in the forward line. Confusing for sure, but at least I know who is correct



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 03:20 AM
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originally posted by: croatianguy
I noticed that when players are said to be playing deep in soccer, that means the player is playing more up the field away from goals. Yet, in Aussie Rules when someone is playing deep it means they are playing more closer to goals. So they totally contradict each other. So who is technically correct in this instance?


I watch Aussie rules all the time and they say they are playing deep in the forward line it means they are playing close to their own goals.

When they play deep in deeeeeeeeeeeeeeee fence they are playing close to the oppositions goals but we Aussies consider anything and everything American is superior to anything Australian, so therefore commontators don't even say they are playing in deeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee fence any more. They are now playing "down back.'

As soon as Americans come up with someother saying you will notice that there will be crush of commentators to be first to use whatever the expression is, they just cant do it quick enough.



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 04:08 AM
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Basically which one you play, generally leads to your league position as well .
Teams that consistently defend deep end up near the bottom of the league .
Teams that play high up the pitch tend to be high up the league table .
That's my view after watching and playing football in the uk .



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 04:32 AM
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a reply to: croatianguy

Stick to soccer mate! Aussie rules, are,,,,aussie rules!!!! Our game here. My game and I stick by those rules and techicalities. Other forms of football should take note...
(Go sainters).


Kind regards,

Bally



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 05:27 AM
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originally posted by: Azureblue

originally posted by: croatianguy
I noticed that when players are said to be playing deep in soccer, that means the player is playing more up the field away from goals. Yet, in Aussie Rules when someone is playing deep it means they are playing more closer to goals. So they totally contradict each other. So who is technically correct in this instance?


I watch Aussie rules all the time and they say they are playing deep in the forward line it means they are playing close to their own goals.


Ah no it doesnt. When a full forward is playing deep in the forward line it means hes playing close to the opposition goals



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 05:10 PM
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a reply to: croatianguy

As to my understanding you aussies have to defend the deep attacker allot. So if I'm correct you do allot of deep defending instead of deep attacking ..?



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