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Insane helicopter pilot skills

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posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 04:06 PM
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a reply to: mindseye1609

I've heard the Fulton also really expands your spine, then compresses it shortly after, leaving many of the riders injured or worse.




posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 04:36 PM
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a reply to: justwanttofly

That's why I was curious about using it for medical evac but I bet you could strap someone down the the board pretty good if need be, in a situation where it's either crazy ride in the Fulton or stuck on a mountain bleeding out, I'd bet 99.99% are gonna take that Fulton ride.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 05:04 PM
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That was an awesome touch downman, nothing is so spectacular as a helicopter.
Do these helicopters have two separate collective controls?



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 06:58 PM
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a reply to: mindseye1609

If they use it for a stretcher, you're tied down so tightly you can't even move your head. That helps a lot with the effects.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 06:59 PM
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a reply to: justwanttofly

The biggest problem with it was the disorientation. They had several people get disconnected, turn around and walk off the ramp without anything holding them to the aircraft.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 07:01 PM
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originally posted by: 321Go
I've seen this incredible feat before. Not that it makes a difference, but was this a British pilot?


Not sure about the Chinook, but those are definitely British troops piling out the back of it, so it is a possibility.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 07:27 PM
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originally posted by: mindseye1609
The Fulton still in use at all?


Oh, I sure hope not.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 07:32 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

They still have the fittings for it on the MC-130 noises. Some at least.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 07:49 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I don't think they do anymore now that the Shadows are retired. As far as I know the Talons and J models don't have the nose equipment.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 08:16 PM
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a reply to: justwanttofly

It's been awhile so they might not.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 08:22 PM
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a reply to: SecretKnowledge

What I would worry about is loss of ground effect.

When a helicopter is hovering within about one rotor diameter of a nice flat, horizontal surface, the downwash bounces off the surface back up to the helicopter and provides additional lift that wouldn't be there if the helicopter was hovering in mid-air.

If something should happen to suddenly make the ground effect go away, you suddenly lose lift and can crash.

This happened in 2002 when a Blackhawk was attempting a rescue on Mt Hood in Oregon. Because the slope was too steep, the downwash--instead of bouncing back up and providing lift--continued on down the slope and caused enough loss of lift that the Blackhawk crashed.

See, for example

Mt Hood Blackhawk Crash

It also happened in the failed 1980 attempt to rescue the hostages from Iran. In that case, one of the helicopters that was refueling from the C-130 on the ground took off and started to depart by flying over the C-130 at very low altitude. The C-130's propellers were still turning because the C-130 didn't have the capability to restart out there in the desert (as I recall). The slipstream from the C-130's props blew the downwash of the helicopter sideways and the ground effect was lost instantaneously. The helicopter lost lift and crashed right on top of the C-130.

It was a very bad day for all involved.



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 05:47 AM
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a reply to: 1947boomer

The other issue is resonance from the rotors.

It can shake that helicopter to the point of forcing the pilot to over correct.



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 09:58 AM
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originally posted by: stumason

originally posted by: 321Go
I've seen this incredible feat before. Not that it makes a difference, but was this a British pilot?


Not sure about the Chinook, but those are definitely British troops piling out the back of it, so it is a possibility.

Pinnacle landings are a standard technique used by any helicopter pilot and is not exclusive to Chinook drivers. I've used this when there wasn't enough space to make a normal landing. You would just plant one skid on the ground while on or off loading troops or supplies.

There was a delivery technique that was used by the Aussies that I wouldn't recommend. You would use a cardboard box with the flaps positioned in such a manner to "autorotate" softly to the ground. I never made this a successful tool and stopped after beaning a infantry captain with a Miller beer can in the field. I confronted the Aussie who showed me the technique and he said that I had to use Foster's beer.



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 12:12 PM
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a reply to: SecretKnowledge

If you'll note the rotor locations, the cg range on the Chinook is phenomenal. With an external load capacity of only around 25.000 lbs or so (limited by the hooks, not the aircraft capability) and a lift capacity of I believe around 55,000 lbs all up (might be more, that's off the top of my head), the 10,000 lbs or so of troops offloading are like a little kid on a horse! Those two 5500 shp Lycomings just give you everything you need.



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 12:26 PM
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originally posted by: cavjafo
a reply to: SecretKnowledge

If you'll note the rotor locations, the cg range on the Chinook is phenomenal. With an external load capacity of only around 25.000 lbs or so (limited by the hooks, not the aircraft capability) and a lift capacity of I believe around 55,000 lbs all up (might be more, that's off the top of my head), the 10,000 lbs or so of troops offloading are like a little kid on a horse! Those two 5500 shp Lycomings just give you everything you need.


The Chinook was the fastest helicopter in the Vietnam era US Army fleet when I was on active duty. We could always ask them to slow down when we came off a LZ. I'm not sure but, I think they could cruise around 160 Kts. Maybe, the new helos like the UH-60 and AH-64 are as fast if not faster.



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 03:03 PM
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a reply to: buddah6

CH47 F models are the newest iteration and still the fastest helicopters currently in service.

That is, until the R97 and other derivatives begin service, if they ever do.



posted on Jul, 2 2015 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn

If you want to see some extreme skills there is a video on YT of helos loading Xmas trees on a truck. Now, that's is some good hands.

Unfortunately, after 45 years I'm still a rotorhead! I love those things though most of my military flight time was fixed wing.
edit on 2-7-2015 by buddah6 because: lobotomized through superior pain meds.




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