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New to the posting side of things....

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posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 12:13 PM
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New to the posting side of things. I have been an ongoing reader on ATS for several years but never had much to say. I hope to write a couple of posts people might find interesting so I figured now is as good of time as any.

Little about myself: Mid thirties, married, kids, couple of dogs. In the process of getting out of the military. Thinking about going into business for myself instead of working for the man. I hope to write some posts on survivalism, self reliance, prepping, and some general information on the operational planning cycle. I see a lot of information the web related to self reliance focusing on the the gear side of things and maybe some on the skill set of general wilderness survival. But not a whole lot on how one takes into account the environment one is in and what risk factors are there. What to do about them and overall how to plan accordingly. I have worked in construction and real estate civilian side, and the Infantry, HUMINT, and SOF for the military.

Anyhoo.. I look forward to being a part of this community and all interesting information available here.




posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 12:19 PM
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I'm afraid we just ran out of official ATS tinfoil hats, but homemade ones are still acceptable, as long as the antennae are over 2" long. Once you've finished making it, please place it on your head, and secure it with the strongest industrial adhesive you can find, before proceeding any further.

Welcome to ATS.
edit on 6/28/2015 by admirethedistance because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 12:27 PM
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a reply to: KlownKilla


What to do about them and overall how to plan accordingly. I have worked in construction and real estate civilian side, and the Infantry, HUMINT, and SOF for the military.

Welcoming a trained professional. You can be helpful in debates about the real priorities during survival situations.

Lots of people 'gear up' for what they have no realm of experience for.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 01:07 PM
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a reply to: admirethedistance

I plan on keeping the RFID implanted in my brain from the military. It extends the range of my cell phone when I am in the back country. LOL, I kidd I kidd.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 01:14 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: KlownKilla


What to do about them and overall how to plan accordingly. I have worked in construction and real estate civilian side, and the Infantry, HUMINT, and SOF for the military.

Welcoming a trained professional. You can be helpful in debates about the real priorities during survival situations.

Lots of people 'gear up' for what they have no realm of experience for.


I look forward to a good debate. I always enjoy it. I might disappoint it that I have found no one really wins a debate. I just try and put a rock in the shoe so to speak. The military is no different than the the civilian side for this kind of thing. I know lots of guys who will wear ALL of the equipment that was issued plus all the cool guy stuff they bought on their own dime. We called them "Geardos".



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 01:48 PM
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a reply to: KlownKilla

Geardos, lol.

What a 'fitting' description.

First to fall out due to fatigue? Some guy in Vietnam used to wrap grenades in sheets of Amatol and hang them on his belt. The yellow color made a good target for snipers, they only found his boots in the crater.

What I meant more is you can identify priorities better being military trained. Survival is rarely glorious, more a matter of simple tasks like procuring water and food, making expedient shelter, that kind of thing.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 02:17 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: KlownKilla

Geardos, lol.

What a 'fitting' description.

First to fall out due to fatigue?



Fatigue is right. Takes a lot of training mentally and physically to get used to being a human pack mule. Carry all that crap also makes it hard to be fast. In bad spots one might be the aggressor or the victim depending on the circumstance as needed. Regardless speed usually wins.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 04:02 PM
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a reply to: KlownKilla


Carry all that crap also makes it hard to be fast.

There, see?

Theres a thread here today about bugout "kits". Thats good advice, travel light.

see ya on the boards… heres some site survival tips…

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 04:16 PM
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a reply to: KlownKilla


Your X-ray results





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