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So Who Has Got Their Bug Out Bag?

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posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 04:35 PM
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More important than a bug out bag is a bug out place.Where are all these city dwellers going to be bugging out to? I don`t think the rural folks are going to be too welcoming in a SHTF situation when they see hoards of city dwellers setting up camp in their cow pastures.




posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 04:38 PM
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You can have as much stuff in your bug out bag as you want.

However, if you wait until SHTF then it's too late to get out.

My question to you is - how will you recognize the signs of collapse to (a) not be seen as crazy when you bug out and (b) bug out just in time before you're not able to.

Also, what makes you think that you'll survive whatever calamity besets the world that would make you want to bug out in the first place?

These are questions I've always wanted to ask someone that's planning some thing like this.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 04:40 PM
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originally posted by: Ceeker63
a reply to: Wirral BagpussMy B.O.B is in my living room along with all my camping and fishing gear. I live in a apartment, so there is no room to store it else where. The only thing I need to dig out of my bedroom closet is my Ruger 10/22. My sisters and dad have already got the RV in place for the summer. We just have a short 40 min drive to our campsite.



Seriously, your bug out plan includes DRIVING ? When the SHTF, i's highly unlikely you'll be able to drive anywhere.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 05:03 PM
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I've got two.

One, my big one, is in my closet right where I can get it. It's just about the only thing in there. Some clothing. Fire starting stuff. A rolled up tarp. Duct tape-2 rolls. Knives-3 of varying sizes, one a box knife with a box of fifty spare blades. Some dried food. Para cord-@100'. Box of assorted shotgun shells. .22 ammunition-2 boxes. .410/.22 combo-broken down. Box of .38 spl. ammunition. Sleeping bag. Space blankets-2. 3-4 books. Storm lamp w/candles (carefully packed-glass.). Soap. Folding shovel. Camp Ax.

Two, my caught by surprise/stranded bag, lives in my car. Two jackets of various weights. 6" mirror. Firestarting stuff. Roadflares (six of 'em, I think). A bit of clothing, one change. A bit of cash-carefully stashed. Blankets-3 (old army wool blankets-older than I am...but really warm). A small tent. Some high energy food. A couple more books. Four flashlights, last I counted...they may have had babies by now.

I have other stuff laying around handy, as well.

Carharts overalls. Serious winter clothing. ...and various tools that'll come in handy for making shelters. Many, many batteries/solar charger.

I was brought up hope for the best, prepare for bad times. I've not needed 'em...yet.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 05:04 PM
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a reply to: deathslayer

The UK does have retreats to places like Wales and the Highlands of Scotland. Plenty of places here to sit out things.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 05:05 PM
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a reply to: babybunnies

Yeppers.

My family worked out details years ago... Meeting places. Alternates even.

...and we're news junkies.

Always best to hunker down, if possible.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 05:18 PM
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I thought about making a bug out bag, and then i thought, where the heck am I going to "bug out" to. I live out in the middle of nowhere.

Now, a get home bag on the other hand, that might be useful since i'm at work for the majority of my waking hours. So I try to keep a small bag in the car if something goes down while I am at work.

Poncho, food, couple of water bottles, lights, a hammock to string up between a couple trees with a light weight tarp to throw over it. But it really shouldn't take me that long to walk less than 10 miles.

I might add a gun to it. I might not. I'd really hate for someone to break into my car and steal it.
edit on 28-6-2015 by zombicide83 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 05:26 PM
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a reply to: zombicide83

Homeout is always best if you can do it... If you have enough land, you can always cache stuff, too.

You can store more stuff. You know the ground. Always best.

Then again? I'm paranoid. Or so I'm told, often enough.
edit on 6/28/2015 by seagull because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 06:16 PM
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Just out of curiousity, is it smart to identify yourself, and what gear you have? Where you'd bug out to? I always wonder at that. I know one hard-core survivalist. How do I know? He told somebody he trusted...and it wasn't me.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 06:31 PM
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a reply to: JohnnyCanuck

I don't know why it wouldn't be...

I'm not out to "fight Magog"... Just get out of the way, should it come to that.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 06:35 PM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: JohnnyCanuck

I don't know why it wouldn't be...

I'm not out to "fight Magog"... Just get out of the way, should it come to that.

You know what is easier than collecting stuff for an emergency or breakdown of society? Finding people who do.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 06:53 PM
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a reply to: JohnnyCanuck

True that.

It's something to consider, certainly. I certainly do.

You'd be mad not to, given what we see happen during any emergency such as the aftermath of a hurricane, or some man made emergency...riots, etc.

Softly, softly is the watch word. ...and friends one can trust.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 07:52 PM
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Gear is a personal decision that should be based on your particular region, potential risk scenarios etc etc...

IMO it is very important to be proficient with the gear you decide to choose for your BOB...

Don't wait until you need it... to learn it...

.02



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 11:50 PM
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I have both a BUG out bag and a bail out vest.

The vest is three day vest and the bag extends it to 2 weeks.

The vest is also a survival vest that i carry in my truck when i go to off road.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 11:55 PM
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a reply to: Wirral Bagpuss



Eberlestock G4 operator.......With TAG sustainment both in Multicam.



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 02:55 PM
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Thought I had a good spread out pic of all the contents, but apparently not on my photobucket, so will have to dig that up. Some items have changed, but mostly the same.

I drive almost 50 miles to work each day, so mine's designed to sustain me somewhat for a 4 day trek or so. More of a GHB (Get Home Bag) than a true BOB, but it has elements of both. Difference is, I plan to mostly eat on the go. I'm not looking to fish or hunt during this time (though I would be able to with the supplies).

It's a regular looking backpack, and I have a change of clothes in the truck. I'll look more like a weekend backpacker, than Rambo. Though I'll be armed and prepared should something go down while I'm at work (and a distance away from the ranch).

I'm a big fan of items with multiple uses.

Some of my favorites:

Metal Water Bottles (has a top that can hook with a carabiner to the backpack to keep it in the drink pockets, but also that helps hang it to boil)

Radio (hand crank, also has flashlight and cell phone charger)

SOG Shovel/Saw/Pick (neat little item that folds well too)

5 in 1 Survival Whistle (has a compass, fire starter, mirror, all kinds of things)

Gerber Multi-Tool (just all around useful)

Black Scout Survival Belt ( www.blackscoutsurvival.com... )
(too cool for words) Not great for work, but fine to keep with the change of clothes.

Altoids Tins (useful for keeping so many things...small fishing kit, medicines, all kinds of things)

Paracord (everywhere, on as many items as possible).



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 04:52 PM
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originally posted by: Gazrok
I drive almost 50 miles to work each day

Wow, really sorry to go off-topic and focus on that, but the most I've ever commuted was 35 miles each way, 1 hour+ each way every day, I hated it after a year then moved closer to less than 2 miles walk each day.

*Edit*
On-topic, I do like to be able to run home in 15 or so minutes if I have to, and I spend much of my normal humdrum daily life walking to places and only driving when I need to.
I tend to adapt my life around that wherever I can.
Keeps me fit and keeps me close to my stuff.
edit on 29.6.2015 by grainofsand because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2015 @ 10:09 AM
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My question to you is - how will you recognize the signs of collapse to (a) not be seen as crazy when you bug out and (b) bug out just in time before you're not able to.


Chances are, I'll be at work (40+ miles away from my ranch) when it's obvious things are going south. Remember back to 911. When the first plane hit, I suspected it was an attack. The second confirmed it, and I basically wanted to leave work right then and go home, before things got too crazy. In hindsight, I should have (and won't make the mistake again). There are certain signs, and you can always use some other excuse to leave early, and head home, hopefully before the traffic jams up. I have numerous different routes home, whether in the truck or on foot, so I'll definitely get out of the city. (Plus I'll have a pistol with me, to help ensure I have a smooth egress).


Also, what makes you think that you'll survive whatever calamity besets the world that would make you want to bug out in the first place?


Basically, because I'm prepared for it. Very few scenarios will destroy everything, and quite frankly, if someone drops a large nuke on the city I work in, not much I can do about it. But, for those other scenarios where I CAN do something about it, I'm prepared. I keep a few different options in my truck that is with me here at work. More than enough to make a 4 day trek home easier on foot if I have to (though I'll drive as far as I can until a traffic jam). Once home, we've been taking steps to make the ranch more self sufficient and it is a pretty good place to ride out post SHTF insanity. We've got a well, septic, chickens, rabbits, gardens, and fruit trees to help provide. We'll be adding goats and more gardening too.

And of course, we're armed, and stocked that way too, as well as food/water stores. Of course, we aren't quite where I want to be yet, but it's about a 5 year plan. We're on year 2 of it. (and I suspect it will be even more years until I ever "stop" prepping in some way or another.

Granted, while I do think about "doomsday" or at least something drastic that causes the grid to cease, my preps also must have an immediate benefit too. I've actually USED my preps in the past, whether periods of unemployment, or during times when something was broken (like when we had a leak in a pipe, we used our water stores to help), or times when we needed money for something other than groceries, so just ate from stored foods mostly. These more common things have caused my wife to back me up in my preps, because she's sees it as just being prepared for anything that could cause a setback.




Wow, really sorry to go off-topic and focus on that, but the most I've ever commuted was 35 miles each way, 1 hour+ each way every day, I hated it after a year then moved closer to less than 2 miles walk each day.


Yeah, it sucks. Audio books help. If a nuke drops on Tampa, I'm toast here at work. At home though, we're far away from any major targets to where even after nuclear attacks, we'd likely be fine. We love living in the country, and yet, we're really only a few minutes away from conveniences. No way we could have a place in the city where my wife could have her horse, for example. It's worth the drive, but I'd be lying if I said I didn't want to work closer to home (or better, FROM home).
edit on 16-7-2015 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2015 @ 10:29 AM
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Bug out bags only slow you down and make you a target. Neolithic man would laugh in the face of your bug out bags.



posted on Jul, 16 2015 @ 12:55 PM
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I created a bug out bag about a month ago. I have been planning to do one for some time and finally did. I agree with most on this topic, home is the best place to stay as long as possible(if not in a city). As for those that think a BOB is useless, I always like to be safe then sorry.

My bag has:
4 Yo-Yo Fishing Reels(these are great check them out)
Jungle Sleeping Bag(for hot nights)
Thermal Sleeping Bag Liner(for cold nights)
Compass/Thermometer(2 in 1)
Hoop Kite Spool(for fishing)
Fishing String/Hooks
Hybrid Flashlight
Pocket Saw
Double Nest Hammock w/rain tarp(way better than a tent or a bed to me and light weight)
Full Tang Tactical Hatchet(not really in the bag or on it but it will be going with me)
GI Can Openers(just in case I scavenge up some canned food, plus they're like razor blades)
Poncho
Para-cord
2 or 3 fire starters(I think some I bought came with one so that would make 3)
Water Filter
Collapsible Water Jugs
Gerber Multi-tool

Things I still plan to get:
Machete
Waterproof maps
Bow or Crossbow(guns run out of bullets)(arrows are quiet and reusable)
Metal Canteen(to boil water)
Animal snares or traps(or maybe learn and practices to do myself)

Possibly more but I feel it's perfect as is considering where I live and would be going to.




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