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So which creation myth do you want taught in UK schools science classes?

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posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 04:51 PM
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originally posted by: NavyDoc

originally posted by: nonspecific
I think I will choose the ancient aliens theory if I may.

It is a perfect blend of history, mysticism and science.

My eight yeaar old son likes the idea as involves spaceships and cool gadgets, I think the kids would pay attention.


Just avoid the Mayans and their 2012 calendar--that didn't work out to well for you.


Thats the trick you see, By going for something that is unlikley to be proven false anytime soon I can avoid looking like an idiot.




posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: NavyDoc

True, all the creation myths from around the world struggle to produce any supporting evidence.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 04:53 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand

Ancient Greek mythology, with their Gods, Goddesses and monsters that manipulated the weather and released 'magical' forces of nature.... great way to show how ancient religions were created to explain the power of mother nature.

They should learn about the ancient religion of Europe: Paganism, which had all the festivities that were converted to Christian festivities when the UK became Christian land (such as Christmas, Easter, etc).

Other two favourites of mine are Celtic and Norse mythology, children in the UK should learn about that part of their heritage.

But all mythology is interesting.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 04:56 PM
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a reply to: Agartha

I agree completely from a social studies viewpoint.
Just teaching it in science classes is lame, and I'm glad that taxpayer funded schools in the UK are prohibited from teaching such myths as scientific theories.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 04:57 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
a reply to: NavyDoc

True, all the creation myths from around the world struggle to produce any supporting evidence.


Agreed.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 05:02 PM
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I agree with Agartha; paganism has some wonderful creation myths. I'd love to learn more about those. I could even be tempted back to school just for the RE lessons!



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 05:05 PM
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a reply to: 321Go

...and you must equally agree that there is no more supporting evidence for Paganism creationist claims than Christian.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 05:14 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
a reply to: Agartha

I agree completely from a social studies viewpoint.
Just teaching it in science classes is lame, and I'm glad that taxpayer funded schools in the UK are prohibited from teaching such myths as scientific theories.


Oh no, mythology is incredibly interesting but has nothing to do with science, two poles apart. Science not only shows children how the world around them works, from metals to bacteria... you name it. Science also teaches them how to critically analyze and to test those ideas they may have... people complain about science and yet everything we have, from medicine to our technology, wouldn't exist without science.

Mythology is about the imagination, superstitions and they can enrich children minds as they open the doors to world culture.

And I am also incredibly glad my kids go to secular school in the UK.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 05:20 PM
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a reply to: Agartha

Agreed.
My son had a brilliant free education and he came away from the state education system with strong critical thinking skills.
Mythology is an important history/sociologically lesson, including all the various and conflicting myths.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 05:22 PM
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originally posted by: 321Go
I agree with Agartha; paganism has some wonderful creation myths. I'd love to learn more about those. I could even be tempted back to school just for the RE lessons!


Absolutely, still all made up by our ancestors to explain mother nature. Christmas, for example, was the Winter solstice celebration, usually held between the 21st and 26th of December: Yule. It was then adapted by Christians in the middle ages and became the birthday of Jesus.

So much to learn about our past, and so interesting!



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 05:22 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
a reply to: 321Go

...and you must equally agree that there is no more supporting evidence for Paganism creationist claims than Christian.

Absolutely. That goes without saying. Religion serves no real purpose any longer.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 05:28 PM
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The logic of a simulated ancestorial universe is the most interesting for me.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 05:34 PM
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a reply to: woodwardjnr

Fair one, do you wish it to be taught in UK state funded science classes as a theory?
Interesting of course, but just mythology all the same.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 05:39 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand Probably more of a philosophical question, although would make an interesting maths and science topic, but not as a topic to base science upon.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 05:42 PM
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originally posted by: woodwardjnr
a reply to: grainofsand Probably more of a philosophical question, although would make an interesting maths and science topic, but not as a topic to base science upon.

So it would be appropriate in 'philosophy and applied ethics' lessons then?
My son never had 'religious education' just 'philosophy and applied ethics' where they discussed religious beliefs.
Good thing in my opinion, I wish it for all UK students.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 05:45 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
a reply to: Cuervo

...so the move by the UK government preventing creationist myths of any flavour being taught in science classes must be a good thing for raising a generation of critical thinkers?


It's absolutely a good thing as it's more anthropological than scientific (not saying anthropology isn't science but you know what I mean).

The irony is that if Christian mythology were actually taught side-by-side with other mythologies, many Christians would complain because it's role is being "minimized". I would love to see an anthropology class that taught world mythologies (including Abrahamic ones) with equal respect given to each. Much like what we see in higher education.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 05:53 PM
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a reply to: Cuervo

Agreed.
All myths should be taught as such, Abrahamic, Hindu, Greek, Norse, whatever, equal status unless one has greater supporting evidence than another. They don't though.
...organised major religions will always complain. Lame.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 06:10 PM
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Where are all the rabid Christians I see in other threads supporting their creation myth?
I'm almost disappointed they do not appear to feel confident enough to share their creation myth in comparison to the myriad of others found throughout the world.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 06:14 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand

I don't want creationism taught in school science classes, AT ALL!

There is a class which is specifically designed to deal with these matters, which I used to take when I was a lad, and it is called Religious Education class. In it, students are taught all about different religious beliefs held throughout the world, practices pertaining thereto, and so on and so forth. There is absolutely no justification for any school, no matter how it is funded, teaching creationism in a science class, and I say that as a believer in Christ.

I am pretty damned sick of the sort of religious fundamentalism and sheer thick headedness, which results in anyone believing that what is really needed in the world is an educational approach which can only result in raising a bunch of people who do not understand that faith is for matters of the soul, and that science is for matters of the physical. The concept is neither complicated, nor difficult to assimilate into ones consciousness, assuming one possesses more than three functional neurons and at least one functional synapse!



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 06:17 PM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
There is a class which is specifically designed to deal with these matters, which I used to take when I was a lad, and it is called Religious Education class.

It is called "Philosophy and applied ethics" these days, same horse though.
Cheers for the reply



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