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So which creation myth do you want taught in UK schools science classes?

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posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 02:48 PM
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Hi folks, I'm starting this thread because the UK bans teaching of creationism in any school that receives public funding thread has devolved (no pun intended) into a debate about creation myth versus science by some particularly rabid creationists who wish to present their case as if it is scientific theory.

What I'm curious about, and what I've posted in the other thread and was ignored is which specific creation myth do you want taught in UK schools?
There are many to choose from, here, I'll list a few:
Greek
Norse
Sumerian
Hindu
Abrahamic - Christian/Muslim/Judaism
Maori
Cherokee
Hopi
Choctaw
Mayan
Ancient Egyptian
Jainism
Etc,

I could go on of course, but you get my point.
Every time I've raised this it is conveniently ignored, because the fact is, science is based on empirical evidence which help support 'scientific' theories while admitting openly that there are gaps in our knowledge.
Creation myths are not. None of them.
They all attempt to fill the gaps in knowledge with god/mysterious force/woo-woo magic did it. Not a scrap of evidence between any of the wildly conflicting myths, while honest science openly admits, 'we don't know', yet.

So ATS, ignore your personal (and seemingly mostly Christian) prejudices here for a moment and tell me why YOUR creation myth is more 'real' than any other. What evidence does your myth have to support it over say the Hiranyagarbha myth of the Hindu's?

This thread is NOT about showing that your creation myth is equal or superior to the current knowledge of accepted science, so please take such arguments elsewhere, perhaps the other thread as that seems to be the argument there.

This thread IS about creationist minded folk to show how their creation myth has any more to back it up than the many many creation myths found around the world.

...and if you believe YOUR creation myth is the true one then please explain why yours should be taught in UK science classes while all the others should be deemed woo woo silliness?

*Again, this is not a science versus creation myth thread, it is a creation myth versus creation myth thread. If you argue with science here it is off-topic and I shall ignore you.




posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 02:57 PM
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I think I will choose the ancient aliens theory if I may.

It is a perfect blend of history, mysticism and science.

My eight yeaar old son likes the idea as involves spaceships and cool gadgets, I think the kids would pay attention.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 03:00 PM
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Thats a great question, my kids are in school, its called waltdorf, they learn throught different mythology the stories of man kind. They take stories from different religion and myths, i think its a great way to learn about man in the past and the different cultures.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 03:01 PM
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I quite like the old primordial slime, single celled organisms to multi celled organisms, simple life forms to fish, then onto land, then all those weird creatures, then dinosaurs, then mammals, primates and humans.

Works for me, and looks cool in books with all those pictures.

I didn't mention plants because, well, they are for rabbits, aren't they!




posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 03:06 PM
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Haha cheers folks

I'm still wondering which creation myth to pin my flag on though, there are so many varied and interesting tales to choose from. Many are much more entertaining than the Christian version, but all equally lacking any evidence to support them.
...perhaps we should teach them all in UK science lessons? (as an awareness exercise of course)



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 03:19 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand

Personally to me the whole creation versus evolution argument has gotten quite boring . I believe in evolution, but I don't believe my position should be forced on everyone .

If I had my choice both classes would be offered and children could make their own choice on which education they want to receive .



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 03:26 PM
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originally posted by: Greathouse
If I had my choice both classes would be offered and children could make their own choice on which education they want to receive .

That's exactly how we do it in the UK.
My son had physics, chemistry and biology lessons at secondary/high school where he learned about evidence based concepts.
He also attended 'philosophy and applied ethics' lessons for a couple of hours each week where he learned about moral choices and various faiths around the world.

That said, he doesn't believe in any gods due to the obvious situation that after lessons he came back to me and said "They can't all be true can they, and none of them have any evidence to support their claims".

Critical thinking was the best lesson/ethos my son had indoctrinated into him. Not just believe one particular creation myth, more a case of question all of the conflicting stories from around the world.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 03:33 PM
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Lets take DNA, the Genetic Code. It is encoded, right? So who wrote this code?

Some people think God poofed it down here, like the first humans ever in the Universe, and some think it was poofed here in electric mud puddles. Nobody alive today was there to see it happen.

They'll never allow talk in classrooms of maybe it was brought here from somewhere else.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 03:39 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Maybe they will someday if the apparent calls for 'creationism' teaching in science classes on ATS one day represents the majority of folk in the UK.
Alien seeding/farming or whatever is no more or less provable than the Christian Genesis story.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 03:43 PM
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I am tempted you ask ms son's CoE school if I can give a class on the ancient alien story now.

But is' Saturday and I will loose my bottle when the beers wear off.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 03:44 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand
I did not study the thread in detail, but I thought most of the demand for creationist teaching was coming from the American contingent.
Isn't this an American civil war being fought out on British soil, as it were?



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 03:47 PM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
a reply to: grainofsand
I did not study the thread in detail, but I thought most of the demand for creationist teaching was coming from the American contingent.
Isn't this an American civil war being fought out on British soil, as it were?



I think you are right on that.

I do not think there will be a great deal of support from British members for the traditional Christian version.

I would imagine that even our Christian members would be against it on the whole.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 03:50 PM
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I don't quite understand the question, as we are banning creation myths (not just Genesis) from State sponsored schools. Why are you asking which should replace it?



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 03:56 PM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
a reply to: grainofsand
I did not study the thread in detail, but I thought most of the demand for creationist teaching was coming from the American contingent.
Isn't this an American civil war being fought out on British soil, as it were?

It seems that way.
I'm just here to point out there are many many conflicting creationist myths in the world so Christians join the queue for credibility with the rest.
...unless of course the rabid US Christians have some evidence I'm unaware of?



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 03:59 PM
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originally posted by: 321Go
I don't quite understand the question, as we are banning creation myths (not just Genesis) from State sponsored schools. Why are you asking which should replace it?

No, you apparently misunderstand the whole thing.
Creationist myths are not banned from UK schools, they can still be taught as an awareness in social sciences lessons or whatever, they just cannot be taught in science lessons.

Now, I ask again, if we are going to teach any creation myths, which ones do we choose?
Do any of them have more evidence than the rest? Do we teach all of them?
...or just Christian ones, as the rabid believers on ATS seem to wish?



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 04:26 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand

originally posted by: 321Go
I don't quite understand the question, as we are banning creation myths (not just Genesis) from State sponsored schools. Why are you asking which should replace it?

No, you apparently misunderstand the whole thing.
Creationist myths are not banned from UK schools, they can still be taught as an awareness in social sciences lessons or whatever, they just cannot be taught in science lessons.

Now, I ask again, if we are going to teach any creation myths, which ones do we choose?
Do any of them have more evidence than the rest? Do we teach all of them?
...or just Christian ones, as the rabid believers on ATS seem to wish?

Sorry, you said exactly what I meant – I missed out 'from science classes'.

Faith-based schools can teach their own faith in exclusivity, but other schools offer RE as several flavours as far as I'm aware. I've heard of State schools touching on many religions within their RE lessons, but the overriding religion taught is Christianity. I personally think if you are teaching general RE you should learn about them all. It's a fascinating subject.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 04:32 PM
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a reply to: 321Go

Agreed, and I have no problem with the state funded Catholic or Church of England schools in my area teaching their religion in social studies type classes. Just not in science, as a lame theory.
That said, how is their creation myth any more valid than Hiranyagarbha?

Should we perhaps teach all of the conflicting beliefs from around the world, or do the Abrahamic god believers have more evidence to support their claims than the others?
We both know that is rubbish and they are equally unable to substantiate their claims.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 04:38 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand

That's the problem. It would almost be acceptable to teach the possibility of intelligent design if it weren't so obviously a way for Christians to sneak their gods into school.

There are definitely secular ways to approach it but I think it will be a few years before we could visit that without religion being wedged into the mix.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 04:46 PM
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a reply to: Cuervo

...so the move by the UK government preventing creationist myths of any flavour being taught in science classes must be a good thing for raising a generation of critical thinkers?



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 04:49 PM
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originally posted by: nonspecific
I think I will choose the ancient aliens theory if I may.

It is a perfect blend of history, mysticism and science.

My eight yeaar old son likes the idea as involves spaceships and cool gadgets, I think the kids would pay attention.


Just avoid the Mayans and their 2012 calendar--that didn't work out to well for you.




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