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Samsung breakthrough could almost double lithium battery capacity

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posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 01:17 PM
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originally posted by: pl3bscheese
a reply to: chr0naut

Dude you really are clueless. Kinda sound like a hipster geek who is really a lightweight. I'm in no way talking about 4g or 5g. Nevermind.


I am too old to be a hipster, I have also studied electronic engineering and design, so I don't think I'm quite as clueless as you imagine.

You, however, sound like a fool from whom their money is soon to be parted.

Here's a link to an Engadget article that may, perhaps, educate you.




posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 01:23 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

Sorry you're butthurt for being schooled by someone else, but you still are showing your ignorance. Not gonna teach you anymore, kid. Too far behind.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 01:42 PM
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originally posted by: pl3bscheese
a reply to: chr0naut

Sorry you're butthurt for being schooled by someone else, but you still are showing your ignorance. Not gonna teach you anymore, kid. Too far behind.


But you didn't teach me anything?

Your posts were brief and almost content-less Samsung fanboi ra-ra (when they weren't being insulting). A fact obvious to anyone who reviews them.

Your absence will not be missed.


edit on 28/6/2015 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 01:50 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

Thanks OP you are right about Graphene......Check out what Ray Kurzweil is saying about the future. Exponential growth means the cell phone you are holding right now will be a billion times faster and a thousand times smaller in ten years. He has the data to back this claim up......Times are about to get very interesting. Can humans reach the next level......Is privacy really a thing of the past.......Will we really live to be 200 years old.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 01:53 PM
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originally posted by: pl3bscheese
It basically means we can have small electric cars going 200-300 miles before needing recharge... it means they're now a viable option for the everyday driver.


well, until you have to spend 3,000 to 5,000 dollars after approx. 5 years for a completely new battery.....that's what I've heard anyway



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 01:56 PM
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a reply to: Azdraik

You can buy 3000 farad ultracaps used on ebay..
The graphene technology is supposed to increase the area that can hold a charge.
They have some kind of fairplay rules for rolling out "new" technology.
Part of that is covering R&D costs.



posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 06:59 PM
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A phone battery that never dies sounds like a wonderful thing. Until you ask yourself how long it might be before we are literally slaves to phones that know more about us than we do.



posted on Jul, 12 2015 @ 01:38 AM
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Ahaha that's so funny. My very first thought was ecig batteries as well.



posted on Jul, 12 2015 @ 03:54 AM
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originally posted by: Corruptedstructure
What country needs invading for this stuff? I really don't see the need for longer battery life with all of the available power sources now. Sorry..I never will own a Samsung. I support the under dogs..



Right, because in an emergency situation such as a natural disaster, the power never goes out. Not to mention, fuel and energy have no problems at all, not to mention battery disposal issues. Gotcha. I really do want to know the answer you were asked about who you do support.



posted on Jul, 19 2015 @ 11:02 PM
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originally posted by: SubTruth
a reply to: Domo1
Exponential growth means the cell phone you are holding right now will be a billion times faster and a thousand times smaller in ten years.


But a phone that is much smaller than a grain of salt is going to need a huge magnifying glass and a very steady hand!

I could go with maybe 100 times faster in 10 years but a billion times faster seems a bit extreme.

Back on topic, hopefully this technology will actually make it to production unlike the many others we hear about.
edit on 19/7/2015 by EasyPleaseMe because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 01:20 PM
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a reply to: Astyanax

Unlike petroleum, lithium is not consumed during lifetime of batteries. If there is a major lithium energy economy, there will be lithium in old batteries, concentrated and ready to recycle.

And there's plenty in Bolivia.



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 04:51 PM
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a reply to: EasyPleaseMe

The new Tesla plant is supposedly planning on gearing up and using tons of flake graphite for quick charge supercaps.
The technical problem is manufacturing storage devices that charge quickly but discharge slowly (to prevent fires and explosions).

There are patents but some designs could possibly be reverse engineered into something dangerous.



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 05:24 PM
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a reply to: jimmyx

Well I think a good chunk of people cycle cars within 5 years, but then you'd have to deal with significant depreciation when selling/trading in a vehicle with drained batteries. My guess is that a business would open up to recycle the batteries cheaper than replacing them. Whoever figures out how to do this in an economical way will be making big monies.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 11:53 AM
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Now if Samsung licence this tech to apple among all the others makers, then an iphone will be up to scratch battery wise...with 2010.



posted on Jul, 22 2015 @ 09:16 AM
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Fairly sure it's silicon anode, not cathode. The usual problem is silicon anodes swell when charged which damages them over time. This breakthrough seems to mitigate that somewhat. Tesla 90 kWh battery cells use silicon/graphite anode and NCA cathode for ~250 Wh/kg and ~715 Wh/L, only 5-10% better than their older NCA/graphite cells. Presumably as the technology improves silicon content will increase leading to improved energy density.

Also another company selling these already: energy.gov...



posted on Jul, 26 2015 @ 01:54 AM
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originally posted by: Corruptedstructure
What country needs invading for this stuff? I really don't see the need for longer battery life with all of the available power sources now. Sorry..I never will own a Samsung. I support the under dogs..



Graphene is super cheap . . . it is a carbon product. We can harvest it from bio-mass like crops or poop.

It is cool $#!t

-FBB



posted on Jul, 26 2015 @ 08:35 AM
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a reply to: FriedBabelBroccoli

Graphene is super expensive.



posted on Jul, 27 2015 @ 12:47 AM
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originally posted by: GetHyped
a reply to: FriedBabelBroccoli

Graphene is super expensive.


www.graphenea.com...


The Quality Of The Graphene Affects The Price

The price of graphene is linked to its quality, and not all applications require superb material quality. For example, graphene oxide powder (graphene functionalized with oxygen and hydrogen) is inexpensive and has been used to make a conductive graphene paper, for DNA analysis, and for other advanced composite and biotechnology applications. Graphene oxide in solution sells for 99 euros per 250 mL from Graphenea. However, the electronic properties of graphene oxide at the moment are not sufficiently good for batteries, flexible touch screens, solar cells, LEDs, smart windows, and other advanced opto-electronic applications.

Mechanically exfoliated graphene (obtained with the famous “scotch tape” technique) comes in small, high-quality flakes. Exfoliated graphene has so far shown to hold the best physical properties, reaching towards theoretically predicted current conduction, mechanical strength, etc. The coverage of mechanically exfoliated graphene, however, is only on the order of a few small flakes per square centimeter, not nearly enough for applications. In addition, the price of such graphene can be on the order of several thousands of dollars per flake.


Depends on the quality, the articles desiring extremely high quality often quote the highest prices.


Articles like this; www.theatlantic.com... would argue otherwise because they only focus on the highest quality.

-FBB
edit on 27-7-2015 by FriedBabelBroccoli because: 101



posted on Aug, 1 2015 @ 11:47 PM
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originally posted by: pl3bscheese
a reply to: jimmyx

Well I think a good chunk of people cycle cars within 5 years, but then you'd have to deal with significant depreciation when selling/trading in a vehicle with drained batteries. My guess is that a business would open up to recycle the batteries cheaper than replacing them. Whoever figures out how to do this in an economical way will be making big monies.


The current solution is to buy the car and rent the battery, with the rental company automatically recycling when the capacity is too low.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 12:02 AM
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does this mean that their mobile phones might finally keep up with everyone elses battery life ?



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