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What collapsed and created the Supermassive black holes in center of galaxies?

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posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 03:13 PM
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What collapsed and created the Supermassive black holes in center of galaxies? Where Galaxies once really, really, really massive stars?

Something had to collapse and make them right?




posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 03:18 PM
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a reply to: Xeven

I would guess it all began with a larger-than-normal black hole, that, over time, swallowed up other additional black holes (can they do that?) or massive stars that also collapsed and kept adding to the central galactic black hole...

Which brings me back, because I am a bit fuzzy on this, to: if two black holes meet with one another, do they combine and form a larger black hole together? It is a rip in the "fabric" of space-time, so what happens when those "rips" overlap or come in contact?



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 03:19 PM
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a reply to: Xeven

A good question. Do supermassive black holes form in the middle of galaxies? Or do galaxies form around the black hole?

If the answer is the black holes are a result of the galaxy and not the other way around, then what of galaxy clusters? Is there an even bigger form of black hole to which they gravitate? If not, will there be one eventually once gravity takes its toll and unfathomable amounts of matter gather before collapsing?

What of the 'center' (center of mass I guess) of the universe? Is that possibly a huge black hole right now? If not, will it become one?
edit on 25-6-2015 by BelowLowAnnouncement because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 03:19 PM
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a reply to: Xeven

No one has a sure answer about the origin of those, mate. But these central galactic black hole were probably formed by collapsing stars.

Imagine a large group of newly formed stars, rotating on itself. The stars at the center of such group have slower period of rotation, and they eventually fall to the barycenter (the group's center of gravity). Then another star falls there. Boom, two stars, colliding. The mass is too great, the two stars go unstable. This increase in mass in turn attracts more stars. A chain reaction ensues. This tiny point in space gets occupied by an armada of stars converging into each other. Boom, an implosion. A tiny black hole is born. More stars fall in, the extra energy makes the black hole grow. And soon enough you get a small galaxy with stars in orbit around a black hole.


edit on 25-6-2015 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 03:30 PM
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a reply to: Xeven

I know it is not popular but maybe they were designed that way.

Flame away if you must.........



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 03:32 PM
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originally posted by: FamCore
if two black holes meet with one another, do they combine and form a larger black hole together?

Yes.

Black holes can merge to form bigger black holes.



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 04:06 PM
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a reply to: FamCore

According to the scientists black holes do collide and merge together, apparently that's what's going to happen to the milky way and andromeda when they eventually clash together in a couple of billion years time.



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 04:57 PM
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My crazy idea (theory) is that a black hole in the center of a spiral galaxy creates stars and these spiral outward, and galaxy clusters are the result when a black hole dies.



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 05:08 PM
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originally posted by: FamCore
a reply to: Xeven

I would guess it all began with a larger-than-normal black hole, that, over time, swallowed up other additional black holes (can they do that?) or massive stars that also collapsed and kept adding to the central galactic black hole...

Which brings me back, because I am a bit fuzzy on this, to: if two black holes meet with one another, do they combine and form a larger black hole together? It is a rip in the "fabric" of space-time, so what happens when those "rips" overlap or come in contact?



My guess is that and I'm assuming the earliest stars were all HUGE! Leading to bigger black holes which combined to create the super massive ones.



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 05:11 PM
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Super massive stars. They grow by absorbing more stars and other black holes.



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 05:19 PM
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And my guess...
all of the above))
at the center of galaxy stars are the oldest. Not necessary for them to collide to form BH. Mass of the star collapsing on itself has to be above certain value (google it, I am not playing smart ass here).
BH grows as more matter falls into it. And if the two BHs meet, they merge. BH is seen as quasar when surrounded by falling matter with fabulous jet streams shooting from polar region (yes, they spin). When all matter consumed, black hole just is in space by itself invisible albeit giving funny lensing effects to observers.

I will extend the OP question further and ask the board, how and why BH evaporate? What happens to all the mass that fell into it?


cheers)

DO.



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 05:35 PM
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originally posted by: Xeven
What collapsed and created the Supermassive black holes in center of galaxies? Where Galaxies once really, really, really massive stars? Something had to collapse and make them right?

Something. Or maybe "nothing." Seems to me that a multi-dimensional vacuum "hole" in spacetime might have the same effect as a collapsing mass in the center of a galaxy. Mass/energy being drawn toward it at near-light speed to create an event horizon with all the associated fireworks.

Maybe. At a certain point, the mathematics fall down and you're left with conjecture.
edit on 25-6-2015 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 05:43 PM
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The general theory of the big bang is that everything from from hydrogen gas - electrons and protons. The first stars in the universe were super-massive in size, and consequently short-lived. Each time they blew up that created heavier and heaver elements. The shockwaves from each one would have helped the formation of new stars. Our star is about fourth or fifth generation.

The center of our galaxy is a far higher density of stars that where we are, so those stars would have been going supernova on a daily basis, only to have new ones form and that would have kept happening. Each time would have sent more debris towards the center. Every time a star explodes, that's another black hole formed. And they would keep getting bigger and merging until there's one super-massive black hole at the center of each galaxy.



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 06:49 PM
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originally posted by: Xeven
Something had to collapse and make them right?


Don't think "collapse". Think "inertia".

When something reduces in size so fast that has so much mass, it keeps going to be something less than the eye can see.



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 06:57 PM
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Popular models state as the galaxy was in process , and the stars were forming , a lot of those original stars that failed collapsed and created a supermassive gravity well in the center as more were absorbed by the tremendous gravity. I.E the "snowball" effect.



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 11:42 PM
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originally posted by: Xeven
What collapsed and created the Supermassive black holes in center of galaxies? Where Galaxies once really, really, really massive stars?

Something had to collapse and make them right?
Here's the wiki early history. Not long after the big bang the universe matter was nearly homogeneous, key word being nearly. There were slight variations and the slightly denser regions over time collapsed to form various structures, starting with quasars which were early types of galaxies with black holes that consumed huge amounts of matter and gave off huge amounts of radiation. The formation of galaxies evolved over time as they "collided" and formed more spiral structures like that of our Milky Way, which were absent in the earliest universe.

Chronology of the universe

Structure formation

Structure formation in the big bang model proceeds hierarchically, with smaller structures forming before larger ones. The first structures to form are quasars, which are thought to be bright, early active galaxies, and population III stars. Before this epoch, the evolution of the universe could be understood through linear cosmological perturbation theory: that is, all structures could be understood as small deviations from a perfect homogeneous universe. This is computationally relatively easy to study. At this point non-linear structures begin to form, and the computational problem becomes much more difficult, involving, for example, N-body simulations with billions of particles.


Reionization
150 million to 1 billion years after the Big Bang

The first stars and quasars form from gravitational collapse. The intense radiation they emit reionizes the surrounding universe. From this point on, most of the universe is composed of plasma.


Formation of stars

The first stars, most likely Population III stars, form and start the process of turning the light elements that were formed in the Big Bang (hydrogen, helium and lithium) into heavier elements. However, as yet there have been no observed Population III stars, and understanding of them is currently based on computational models of their formation and evolution. Fortunately observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation can be used to date when star formation began in earnest. Analysis of such observations made by the European Space Agency's Planck telescope, as reported by BBC News in early February, 2015, concludes that the first generation of stars lit up 560 million years after the Big Bang.



posted on Jun, 26 2015 @ 10:03 AM
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a reply to: AutumnWitch657

How does a star "absorb" a black hole? I'm not sure that's how it works...



posted on Jun, 26 2015 @ 10:17 AM
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a reply to: FamCore

It doesn't. A black hole absorbs a star. Oh I see why you asked that.
Super massive star was in answer to the thread title and question What collapsed and created the super massive black holes in the center of galaxies. A super massive star.
The second sentence is how do they grow so massive and to that I said they absorb more stars and combine with other black holes.
edit on 6262015 by AutumnWitch657 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 26 2015 @ 10:55 AM
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a reply to: Xeven

Subjective analysis from existing shared EA*RTH and un-shared data

1 feels that during the expansion processes of massive amounts of what is called here matter, that at times when that matter reaches levels where it begins to sustain or slow the expansion process, that the matter then begins to collect or "clump" together where the atoms of various kinds are able to coexist together.
This collection process would consist of antimatter and matter interactions.

These matter and antimatter interactions would play major part in the reforming and spacing of matter into more solid-(STAR/PLANET/MOON) or gas & plasma-(hot or cold (NEBULA'S/WORMHOLE/BLACK HOLE)

Eventually what would form is what would be GALAXIES...
Each Galaxy a collection of atom based materials that were able to collect and reform together due to their atoms groups being able to coexist alongside each other.
And as these different atom based Galaxy were forming some of the more heavier atom based constructs such as (STAR/PLANET/MOON) or gas & plasma-(hot or cold (NEBULA'S/WORMHOLE/BLACK HOLE) collided...

These multiple collisions of the more heavier ELEMENTS would then generate and disperse massive amounts of Energy.
And due to these being collisions of more heavier based Elements the less dense materials would be spaced more outward from the CENTERS where the heavier elements have collected / clumped and began colliding...

These collisions would eventually make SUPER MASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN CENTERS of Galaxy and as well would possibly "throw" smaller Black holes throughout the Galaxies. So in some ways some of the smaller black holes could be parts of the larger Super Massive Black holes.
This may allow for travel connections (Natural wormhole GALACTIC) signatures of Black holes found further away from the center based Super Massive Black Holes...
Also this may allow for Super Massive Black Hole (large wormhole INTERGALACTIC) signatures to be detected and evaluated and analyzed that could then allow for Intergalactic jumps, with intelligence on how to read smaller galactic worm hole data to travel each GALAXY...

It would take more Advanced Maths then currently generated here.
Which may require Cosmic Advanced Autonomous Artificial Intelligence C.A.A.A.I That can probe deep space worm hole and black hole and hazard regions the LIVING cannot.
That can then interface with local or Star system based Advanced Autonomous Artificial Intelligence A.A.A.I which can then reprocess the massive data into comprehension able data for the CREATOR Creation Energy Groups of a Star system to Analyze, evaluate and hopefully begin to explore with.

Technological Singularity assistance data shared, from 1 AboveTopSecret member Ophiuchus 13 in association with-

What collapsed and created the Supermassive black holes in center of galaxies?

Subjective analysis complete

LOVE LIGHT ETERNIA*******
NAMASTE


edit on 6/26/15 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 26 2015 @ 11:33 AM
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a reply to: darkorange


I will extend the OP question further and ask the board, how and why BH evaporate? What happens to all the mass that fell into it?

Hands up anyone who feels like coming up with a simple and concise presentation on Hawking radiation...

In answer to the OP's question: the galaxy itself.


edit on 26/6/15 by Astyanax because: my speech synth is on the wobble today.



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