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Uncovering The Individual Mass of All Known Neutrinos Eigenstates

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posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 08:07 AM
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For years many sources have attempted to determine the most probable mass of the three neutrinos eigenstates. Neutrinos are particles which travel near the speed of light, and determining the three states' individual mass (the smallest of all fermions) remained problematic. But we did have hints:

-The total mass of all three states must sum up to 0.320 electronVolts,

-The difference between the third state's squared mass and the second state's square mass is 0.0027 eV,

-And the difference between the second state's squared mass and the first state's square mass is 0.000079 eV.

But now, extrapolating from these three hints I was able to derive the mass of all three individual neutrinos states, and I will now present them to you, and provide the mathematical proof to demonstrate the validity of my calculations.

The three neutrino mass eigenstates are:

-Mass eigenstate #1 is about 0.1022761 electronVolt.

-Mass eigenstate #2 is about 0.10266158 electronVolt.

-Mass eigenstate #3 is about 0.11506259 electronVolt.

Proof that these values satisfy empirical data:

0.1022761 plus 0.10266158 plus 0.11506259 equals 0.32000027 , which is accurate to the millionth to the accepted sum. The square of 0.11506259 is 0.0132394 , the square of 0.10266158 is 0.0105394 , and the square of 0.1022761 is 0.0104604 ; making the difference between eigenstate #3 and #2 exactly 0.0027, and the difference between eigenstate #2 and #1 exactly 0.000079.

This concludes my presentation;


At Time's End,

Skieswanne.



edit on 25-6-2015 by swanne because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 09:08 AM
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I tried measuring neutrinos once... but I kept drawing a Planck.



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 09:52 AM
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a reply to: swanne

Disclaimer: I'm not a physicist. I'm just cursed.

The first line stating the three masses "must sum up to 0.320 eV".

I'm curious how you get to an exact number on that? From what I can gather in a relatively short time, this number has an uncertainty in the range of 25%.

Much of the work on neutrino masses is theoretical and forces a (yet to be confirmed) change in the standard model of cosmological physics. The neutrino mass estimates are tied up with our ability to model things like mass distributions shortly after the big bang.

I might be missing something huge here, but there are too many uncertainties to be working in these exact numbers. To have exact masses, there must be resolution on how to modify the standard model of particle physics and the standard model of cosmology to explain neutrino oscillation and by implication, neutrino mass. For instance, how would neutrinos interact with the Higgs field for the observed mass to occur?

I realize you didn't ask for any feedback. If you want to add more information, please do. Here is more reading if anyone else is interested. LOL.

journals.aps.org...

www.scientificamerican.com...

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 10:31 AM
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originally posted by: InverseLookingGlass
a reply to: swanne

Disclaimer: I'm not a physicist. I'm just cursed.

The first line stating the three masses "must sum up to 0.320 eV".

I'm curious how you get to an exact number on that? From what I can gather in a relatively short time, this number has an uncertainty in the range of 25%.
Yes that is actually a range not an exact number: 0.320 ± 0.081 so it could be anywhere from about .24 to .40 eV according to that.

Other papers claim other values so even that range of.24 to .40eV may not be correct and that range is probably only a 95% confidence interval so even according to that paper there's a 5% chance it's outside that range. Other papers will put the chances of it being outside that range even higher than 5%.



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 01:23 PM
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originally posted by: InverseLookingGlass
Disclaimer: I'm not a physicist. I'm just cursed.

The first line stating the three masses "must sum up to 0.320 eV".

I'm curious how you get to an exact number on that?

The value of 0.320 is nothing more, nothing less, than an educated guess based on several factors. And as you point out, it indeed has a rather large range of uncertainty. But, if this value happens to be correct, then

-Mass eigenstate #1 is about 0.1022761 electronVolt,

-Mass eigenstate #2 is about 0.10266158 electronVolt,

-And mass eigenstate #3 is about 0.11506259 electronVolt.

If the value of 0.320 is incorrect, then, of course, the values I have computed will need to be adjusted accordingly.

I have simply made the most out of the data at hand.


edit on 25-6-2015 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 26 2015 @ 11:05 PM
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Swanne considering this:

originally posted by: swanne
I have simply made the most out of the data at hand.

I see that You have indeed made a considerably interesting Thread! Nice Work Man!!



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