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UK Police Child Abuse Cover Up Hasn't Just Gone Away!

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posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 04:46 AM
In the US the allegation was always that certain "groups" would run/facilitate/protect child abuse rings to recruit easily controlled assets.

Obviously the UK doesn't have groups with interests in Muslims or Heroin (or its country of origin).
There are definitely no "groups" that could influence the police, CPS and local authorities so probably just a coincidence.
edit on 25-6-2015 by Jukiodone because: (no reason given)

posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 04:51 AM
a reply to: enlightenedservant

It does seem that the more influential a person is, the more they can get away with. Think of Savile: that was covered up until after he was dead! But it still begs the question... why is the police covering things up? I know this is sort of off-topic, but look at Hillsborough. They're still trying to avoid that, too. What I'm trying to say is if they can cover something up as big as child abuse, what else have they hidden away from us?

posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 09:36 AM
a reply to: Tenebris

Good information here and elsewhere on this site. Click on UK at the top of the page and read what you can.

...boys were being killed by the 'Westminster paedophie network'...

Don't mention the truth...

'Pakistani males account for half of all identified suspects in the force (37 of 75).
'Offenders are likely to have a history of previous sexual offences, as well as a wide range of other offences and convictions.
'A high level of organised criminality has now been evidenced both across the force area and regionally, with multiple offenders working together to identify, groom and abuse victims.

Read more: lamed-racial-tensions-ahead-General-Election.html#ixzz3e5GFmikZ
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The shocking document also highlighted fears of 'community tensions' if the police made the report's findings public.
It stated: 'The predominant offender profile of Pakistani Muslim males... combined with the predominant victim profile of white females has the potential to cause significant community tensions.
'There is a potential for a backlash against the vast majority of law abiding citizens from Asian/Pakistani communities from other members of the community believing their children have been exploited.
'These factors, combined with an EDL protest in Dudley in April and a General Election in May could notably increase community tension.
'Police will be criticised if it appears we have not safeguarded vulnerable children, investigated offences and prosecuted offenders.'

Read more: lamed-racial-tensions-ahead-General-Election.html#ixzz3e5Gcr7Mw
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Hillsborough and other 80's tragedies are starting to look very much like deliberate black operations being used largely as a way to cause us to distrust all constables. The reason for this is to help introduce private police who will protect precisely the criminals in power who are committing atrocities. You can verify what I say about Hillsborough by studying the evidence made available through the inquest and comparing it to the anti-constabulary version pumped out through the mainstream media.

posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 12:32 AM
a reply to: Kester

What disturbs me is the unwillingness on the part of the authorities to address the problem due to the ethnicity of the majority of offenders...

posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 08:41 AM
a reply to: Tenebris

Ridiculous, isn't it. A friend of mine was perversely proud of his nickname, 'The Black Hand'. In a drunken moment he'd stolen a bottle of whiskey. The shop assistant had only seen his hand as he reached around and took it. She passed on the description, 'a black hand', to the police and the name stuck. Seeing as there were only a handful of young men in the area that weren't white, tracking him down didn't take much time. Any other young men questioned at the time could easily have cried racism. It wasn't racist, it was just practical and logical in the circumstances.

The element I see that is rarely discussed is this. What kind of person abandons their homeland looking for a better life elsewhere? Why not stay at home and strive to improve the situation for the old, young or sick who have no opportunity to leave? (Obviously those in danger if they stay are a very different story.)

I'm not overly impressed by those from here who've gone abroad looking for a better life, then take every opportunity to whinge about the state of things here. Why didn't they stay here with the rest of us and work to improve their homeland?

So that's my point, and I'm sure it'll make me very unpopular. Greedy, selfish, self-centered people from here go rushing off to the States, Australia or wherever looking to improve their own lives. Equally the same type come here from elsewhere, leaving the more public spirited, socially conscious types behind.

That sounds super non PC, I better prepare myself for a backlash.

When I look at this video I ask myself, is this how control of a community centre is decided in Bangladesh? Or is this behaviour typical of Bangladeshis who've moved to Leeds and left the more constructive people behind? And to be more precise, where are the women? This is an example of male Bangladeshis who moved to Leeds fighting for power over a community centre. Why? Is there a secret hidden in this?

It is believed the fight broke after discussions about who is in charge of the group.

The video was uploaded by Zayd ul Islam with the comment: ‘People want to change things globally, let’s start locally mates! Starting with ourselves, our families, the local area, the community and then maybe abroad.
Exactly the same can and should be said for all those who want to go abroad and influence others through force or other forms of persuasion. Start locally.

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