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Strange features on the Giza Plateau.

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posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 08:30 AM
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Thanks for the thread merely replying to keep tabs on it and to have a further read after work. One thing I will say is .. If I could go back in time ancient eygpt would be one place id loved travel back to




posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 01:35 PM
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originally posted by: Pixman
Just saying, Granite is a 'good' electrical conductor under certain conditions:
gji.oxfordjournals.org...

Granite & Limestone both have electrical capabilities, but I cannot say in what magnitude it is possible to put much current through it as a conductor.
And you have to harness the energy first, too.

But it's interesting they used stones from miles away for those projects. And especially limestone and granite.


You can make a nice polished surface with granite compared to sandstones. Could be just as simple as that, Easy to clean after a round of butchering animals.
edit on 25-6-2015 by TinfoilTP because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 03:51 PM
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originally posted by: Sunwolf

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: pheonix358
Suggesting that shared architectural features can date a structure is simply silly IMHO.

My house has roof tiles. They are nearly identical to roof tiles used by the roman empire.

The roman empire existed two thousand years ago. My house dates from the 1980s.

P

And the Romans used kiln-dried two-by-four pine sandwiched between sheets of gypsum board for their interior walls?

Harte



Uh,you forgot fiberglass insulation and romex!

Well, I thought it was enough.

OCD much?


Harte



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 03:53 PM
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originally posted by: Pixman
But it's interesting they used stones from miles away for those projects. And especially limestone and granite.

I could check on the granite, but I already know where the limestone came from.

Right out of the ground next to the temples.

At Giza, anyway.

Harte



posted on Jun, 25 2015 @ 05:47 PM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Pixman
But it's interesting they used stones from miles away for those projects. And especially limestone and granite.

I could check on the granite, but I already know where the limestone came from.

Right out of the ground next to the temples.

At Giza, anyway.

Harte

The granite came from Aswan



posted on Jun, 26 2015 @ 02:50 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Clark’s comments dismantle the “civil war” talking point pushed by Western media, which alleges that so-called “rebels” spontaneously rose up against Assad without US influence.



posted on Jun, 26 2015 @ 07:17 AM
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Temple also fails as he still believes that alle the cartouches inside the relieving chambers are fake by Vyse..

the canals, I think they are for ceremonial services including water, even if the flow may be little .



posted on Jun, 26 2015 @ 03:59 PM
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originally posted by: Marduk

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Pixman
But it's interesting they used stones from miles away for those projects. And especially limestone and granite.

I could check on the granite, but I already know where the limestone came from.

Right out of the ground next to the temples.

At Giza, anyway.

Harte

The granite came from Aswan

So I assumed. I knew if I waited someone would tell me, so I didn't have to look it up.

Harte



posted on Jun, 26 2015 @ 10:28 PM
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The Pyramids are on the banks of the Nile.
The most important thing was to plant crops to feed the masses according to the cycle of the Nile flooding.
There were recorded famines.
Seed storage would be important.
The large pyramids remain at constant temperature no matter the time of day or night or season.

Their dark ages of the past would have been the hunter gatherer way of life. Losing agriculture would be to them like modern society losing energy.

Thus an explanation of Pyramids could be rather simple, and explain their huge importance to the point of spending millions of man hours on them.

The temples around them could have been grain dispensaries, exchanges for livestock, slaughterhouses etc.



posted on Jun, 26 2015 @ 10:52 PM
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To continue the thought,

To get the masses of commoners to do what the learned administrators of society know is needed, deities with orders and priesthoods are implemented and thus we see the administration of the kingdom and religion go hand in hand. In this way people will pound on rocks with harder rocks and bits of copper for a large proportion of their lives without refusing. The government buildings where necessary administrative things are done to support society are steeped in religious significance, the temples.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 03:51 AM
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originally posted by: TinfoilTP
The Pyramids are on the banks of the Nile.
The most important thing was to plant crops to feed the masses according to the cycle of the Nile flooding.
There were recorded famines.
Seed storage would be important.
The large pyramids remain at constant temperature no matter the time of day or night or season.



Poor harvests and famine due to lacking Nile inundations probably motivated the ancient Egyptians to invent grain storage ˜4500 years ago (Table 1). The early employment of granaries is documented by models and drawings found in several tombs since the Archaic Period (˜3000–2635 B. C., fig. 1). The structure of granaries, comprising storage chambers of either vaulted or rectangular shape, was essentially similar throughout all dynasties. The basic type of storage chambers was dome-shaped (figs. 2, 5, 8) and was probably derived from sleeping huts of the predynastic Delta culture.

Source

Harte



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 08:50 AM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: TinfoilTP
The Pyramids are on the banks of the Nile.
The most important thing was to plant crops to feed the masses according to the cycle of the Nile flooding.
There were recorded famines.
Seed storage would be important.
The large pyramids remain at constant temperature no matter the time of day or night or season.



Poor harvests and famine due to lacking Nile inundations probably motivated the ancient Egyptians to invent grain storage ˜4500 years ago (Table 1). The early employment of granaries is documented by models and drawings found in several tombs since the Archaic Period (˜3000–2635 B. C., fig. 1). The structure of granaries, comprising storage chambers of either vaulted or rectangular shape, was essentially similar throughout all dynasties. The basic type of storage chambers was dome-shaped (figs. 2, 5, 8) and was probably derived from sleeping huts of the predynastic Delta culture.

Source

Harte


Cool, that is for storing the vast harvests but even those can go bad under certain conditions which would spell doom. Rodent infestation on plague scales, molds etc. I was suggesting large structures could have held pottery with seeds as a reserve in case of famine conditions so they could plant their crops when the bad years passed. The graineries could get wiped out under certain conditions which were rare but would have been recorded so that even if generations went by without experiencing it, the ruling class would have known about the possibility.



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 09:59 AM
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form follows function...

those channels, rectangular flutes might be keyways in a different application

instead of channeling or draining fluid towards or away from something... they could have housed optical cables into the darker interior areas... just trying to incorporate the surprising inward angle into the function...

are the channels actually angled or dead level?

of course the channels could be an airtight pathway for a blast of Air to be forced (by a sizeable bellows) to inflate something inside the structure or perhaps turn a windmill device, as if by magic !

hey, the ancient Priesthood was like the politicians-lawyers-finance moguls of today... they had to Amaze the uneducated with a combo of science/magic-wizardry



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 11:26 AM
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originally posted by: TinfoilTP

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: TinfoilTP
The Pyramids are on the banks of the Nile.
The most important thing was to plant crops to feed the masses according to the cycle of the Nile flooding.
There were recorded famines.
Seed storage would be important.
The large pyramids remain at constant temperature no matter the time of day or night or season.



Poor harvests and famine due to lacking Nile inundations probably motivated the ancient Egyptians to invent grain storage ˜4500 years ago (Table 1). The early employment of granaries is documented by models and drawings found in several tombs since the Archaic Period (˜3000–2635 B. C., fig. 1). The structure of granaries, comprising storage chambers of either vaulted or rectangular shape, was essentially similar throughout all dynasties. The basic type of storage chambers was dome-shaped (figs. 2, 5, 8) and was probably derived from sleeping huts of the predynastic Delta culture.

Source

Harte


Cool, that is for storing the vast harvests but even those can go bad under certain conditions which would spell doom. Rodent infestation on plague scales, molds etc. I was suggesting large structures could have held pottery with seeds as a reserve in case of famine conditions so they could plant their crops when the bad years passed. The graineries could get wiped out under certain conditions which were rare but would have been recorded so that even if generations went by without experiencing it, the ruling class would have known about the possibility.

Your suggesting the GP as a granary?

There's not a lot of room inside, you know.

Not much use for storage.

Harte



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 11:30 AM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: TinfoilTP

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: TinfoilTP
The Pyramids are on the banks of the Nile.
The most important thing was to plant crops to feed the masses according to the cycle of the Nile flooding.
There were recorded famines.
Seed storage would be important.
The large pyramids remain at constant temperature no matter the time of day or night or season.



Poor harvests and famine due to lacking Nile inundations probably motivated the ancient Egyptians to invent grain storage ˜4500 years ago (Table 1). The early employment of granaries is documented by models and drawings found in several tombs since the Archaic Period (˜3000–2635 B. C., fig. 1). The structure of granaries, comprising storage chambers of either vaulted or rectangular shape, was essentially similar throughout all dynasties. The basic type of storage chambers was dome-shaped (figs. 2, 5, 8) and was probably derived from sleeping huts of the predynastic Delta culture.

Source

Harte


Cool, that is for storing the vast harvests but even those can go bad under certain conditions which would spell doom. Rodent infestation on plague scales, molds etc. I was suggesting large structures could have held pottery with seeds as a reserve in case of famine conditions so they could plant their crops when the bad years passed. The graineries could get wiped out under certain conditions which were rare but would have been recorded so that even if generations went by without experiencing it, the ruling class would have known about the possibility.

Your suggesting the GP as a granary?

There's not a lot of room inside, you know.

Not much use for storage.

Harte


You don't need a lot of room to save seeds. The granary is what you posted. My idea was more emergency seed storage for severe plague episodes that last years to plant later. Molded out granarys would get burnt ruining the seeds at those locations. A backup to start a new harvest when normal conditions returned is all I am suggesting. It sounds mundane to us but would have held the key to their kingdoms survival from getting scattered to the four winds and starting over. The ancient Egyptians did survive many famines. We see evidence of other ancient cultures that vanished from natural disasters.
edit on 27-6-2015 by TinfoilTP because: (no reason given)


More on topic, today we use stainless steel in areas where we want maximum sanitary conditions. In the ancient days polished marble would have been the best choice.
edit on 27-6-2015 by TinfoilTP because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 01:34 PM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: TinfoilTP

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: TinfoilTP
The Pyramids are on the banks of the Nile.
The most important thing was to plant crops to feed the masses according to the cycle of the Nile flooding.
There were recorded famines.
Seed storage would be important.
The large pyramids remain at constant temperature no matter the time of day or night or season.



Poor harvests and famine due to lacking Nile inundations probably motivated the ancient Egyptians to invent grain storage ˜4500 years ago (Table 1). The early employment of granaries is documented by models and drawings found in several tombs since the Archaic Period (˜3000–2635 B. C., fig. 1). The structure of granaries, comprising storage chambers of either vaulted or rectangular shape, was essentially similar throughout all dynasties. The basic type of storage chambers was dome-shaped (figs. 2, 5, 8) and was probably derived from sleeping huts of the predynastic Delta culture.

Source

Harte


Cool, that is for storing the vast harvests but even those can go bad under certain conditions which would spell doom. Rodent infestation on plague scales, molds etc. I was suggesting large structures could have held pottery with seeds as a reserve in case of famine conditions so they could plant their crops when the bad years passed. The graineries could get wiped out under certain conditions which were rare but would have been recorded so that even if generations went by without experiencing it, the ruling class would have known about the possibility.

Your suggesting the GP as a granary?

There's not a lot of room inside, you know.

Not much use for storage.

Harte



I read somewhere the pyramid consists of a lot of stone actually.
I have to look up that though.

*maybe there is some place left in the ´hall of records´. down below.


edit on 27-6-2015 by anti72 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 09:33 PM
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originally posted by: TinfoilTP
You don't need a lot of room to save seeds. The granary is what you posted. My idea was more emergency seed storage for severe plague episodes that last years to plant later. Molded out granarys would get burnt ruining the seeds at those locations. A backup to start a new harvest when normal conditions returned is all I am suggesting. It sounds mundane to us but would have held the key to their kingdoms survival from getting scattered to the four winds and starting over. The ancient Egyptians did survive many famines. We see evidence of other ancient cultures that vanished from natural disasters.

However, more granaries also solves the problem, and better.

Are you of the opinion that mold and rodents can't enter a pyramid?


originally posted by: TinfoilTPMore on topic, today we use stainless steel in areas where we want maximum sanitary conditions. In the ancient days polished marble would have been the best choice.

That's funny when you realize that the ground up grains they used contained rock chips and insects.

The AE's didn't know much about sanitation. They were rife with parasitic worms (schistosomiasis.)

Harte


(post by TistorEuse removed for a serious terms and conditions violation)
(post by TistorEuse removed for a serious terms and conditions violation)
(post by TistorEuse removed for a serious terms and conditions violation)


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