It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Knife Question

page: 1
1

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 01:46 PM
link   
So where do I find the knife experts? In the survival section, I hope!
A friend recently picked up this little beauty at a garage sale. Sharp edge, and a horn handle with a copper rivet. Thoughts?




posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 01:56 PM
link   

originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck
So where do I find the knife experts? In the survival section, I hope!
A friend recently picked up this little beauty at a garage sale. Sharp edge, and a horn handle with a copper rivet. Thoughts?


Looks like a private made knife like those going around in the 70's.

People in our respective countries use to do small scale smelting. But with automated manufacturers and new high carbon steels, the small knife shops were put out of business. Just like the shade tree mechanics and neighborhood lawnmower repair guy.


Mike Grouchy



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 02:07 PM
link   
a reply to: JohnnyCanuck

From the shape of the blade I would say its used for skinning.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 02:27 PM
link   
yip, looks like a skinner of some sort, but she sure is ugly.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 02:59 PM
link   
Pretty sure that knife has been on the bad end of some bad business. I love knives and own quite a few but that on creeps me out. I want it!



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 03:18 PM
link   
a reply to: Soloprotocol

Actually, it's kinda pretty in a strictly utilitarian sort of way.

Looks like maybe a kit knife sort of thing. I have one of those sitting in my desk drawer. Ugly as sin, but it's beyond just merely sharp. Paid two bucks for it at a yard sale, built it myself in an afternoon--took me a couple of years to remember I had it.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 03:26 PM
link   
Looks like a homemade skinner. Likely made from tool steel, possibly an old file or saw blade. Probably high carbon content judging by rust. Person that made it obviously has made knives before as it appears they have the ergonomics and balance down, and they made it a full tang knife. Not sure why the copper pins unless they didn't have a weighted press fit or wanted something a bit softer if they were using it for chopping of some sort.

Can't tell the thickness of the blade from the pic, but if it is fairly thin then I would say it was made for skinning. How do you know it is horn? And when I look at the close up, the copper is likely just a decorative plug and not a full pin. Typically a pin, or standoff would be steel and press fit into the knife so it would be very tight.

Cool find. With a bit of cleanup, hit it on a paper wheel, put some flitz wax on it and use the hell out of it.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 06:29 PM
link   
its seen better days.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 07:12 PM
link   
I'll stick with my KaBar or SoG Navy seal elite.

But it's got a cool look. Personally I like serrated edge on my blades



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 07:33 PM
link   
Looks like an 1800s skinner from Canada. Probably made by the Natives.

Depending on the length ,weight and thickness of the blade? Its probably a pretty good knife

I make all mine from lawnmower blades, so if the steel is anything comparable to 1065, 4140 or higher and can be sharpened? Hes good to go



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 08:54 PM
link   
I don't know why the aesthetic value of that fine tool seem to be in question. It appears to be a well made carbon steel blade with a well tapered handle to prevent blood or other liquids from completely compromising the grip. It looks like a fantastic skinning knife.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 09:55 PM
link   
a reply to: JohnnyCanuck

Note the scale, folks...9 cm = 3 1/2 inches. If it's a skinner, it's for skinning mice.




posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 10:20 PM
link   
a reply to: JohnnyCanuck



Centimeter didn't even occur to me. I honestly thought it was the photographers initials...

Three and a half inches...

No idea, save maybe a salesman sample? Doesn't make much sense, but that's all I got.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 11:05 PM
link   
Canadian Native women's skinner. At 3 1/2 inches its perfect for small game and inside work.

Ive cleaned and processed entire deer with a 2 inch pocket folder, in truth you really don't need survival knives over 4 1/2 inches as they become more dangerous to the user the longer they get
edit on 23-6-2015 by SPECULUM because: cowbell



new topics

top topics



 
1

log in

join