It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Australian implants to enable payments with a wave of the hand

page: 1
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 06:42 AM
link   
Knew this was only ever matter of time.

The article reveals that a concerning number of Australians – including 25% of those surveyed – are ‘slightly interested’ in the notion of having a chip implanted in their skin as an effective way to make payments over the counter, as a subcutaneous chip would let consumers pay at a retail terminal without a wallet, credit card, smart phone or smart watch.

This new approach would allow consumers to simply wave their bare hand over an outlet, similar to phone-and-chip responsive technology already introduced to the retail industry across Australia in recent years.

The survey was conducted for the global payments firm by UMR, who provide full-service opinion research based in Australia and New Zealand and work across the Asia Pacific region. The CEO of UMR, Campbell White has a PhD in Social and Media Psychology. Furthermore, John Utting – the Company Director – has served as a pollster for two Australia Prime Ministers, three New Zealand Prime Ministers and numerous Australian State Premiers.


Fits in well with the cashless society, traces spending to the individual - unless of course a new crime emerges whereby you are forced to swipe your hand and pay for someones else's goods, especially when swipe-your-hand comes to ATMs.

Notice how the tracking chip has got closer and closer to the body. First, it was/is in phones but they are not always attached to the body. This proposal includes putting them in wearable devices such as watches, glasses and bangles. Trouble is, they can easily be separated from the body cant they?

Once it's implanted into the hand it will be universally accepted by the courts as sufficient evidence you the wearer made the expenditure, case proven beyond reasonable doubt for ever unless you the warer can present incontrovertible evidence to the contrary.

So what happens to those who have money deducted by someone who has a portable reader when the wearer, is asleep or unconscious??

Getting a little twitchy?

How long will it be before the chip in the hand is "I'm sorry sir but its the only form of identity we can accept."

How long after the introduction of this technology will it be before its compulsory, like the push for compulsory vaccination is already upon us, will it be extended to medical records, employment records, the last 30 days of bank transactions, fines imposed in the last 60 days, your criminal record, your credit rating, outstanding warrants, when you last brought alcohol etc?

A little bit of prophecy.

One day a sheepleperson will realise that someone other than them can put data into the chip and someone other them can take data out of the chip but they themselves can neither put data in nor take it out. They will then feel, for the first time, that their sovereignty as a free, individual sovereign human being, has been compromised. When that happens what will they think they have become - one guess only is permitted.

whats the chances that the only thing wearer will be able to do is top up their bank credits.

As the technology and its use advances, as is already happening with other technology, their choices and options about what they can do and can't do and what Terms and Conditions they will find themselves agreeing to get any services, they will feel, for the second time, that their sovereignty as a free, individual sovereign human being, has been compromised. Gotcha!

Link

Sleep well.




posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 06:47 AM
link   
There aren't any tracking chips. They literally don't exist.

It was a survey. And only 25% were even slightly interested. Which means 75% weren't.

It's not like it's a manifesto of forced implanting of some non-existent "tracking chip".



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 07:01 AM
link   
a reply to: Azureblue

1000 people isnt a very large pool of people.

It should be noted too that 32% chose smartwatch; 29% a smart ring, and 26% with smart glasses.

It would appear that if there were only 4 options, an implant garnered the least interest. Out of 1000 people


edit on 23/6/15 by Chadwickus because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 07:29 AM
link   
In all honesty, it is the future and it is inevitable.

Survey or not, the masses are slowly being introduced into the cashless idea with the constant electronic transactions daily. It isn't something that is quickly adopted, which is why they have allowed its slow and gradual process to be developed and accepted.

Unfortunately I don't think it is necessary or even a good idea. Beliefs aside, it is purely for more control and an easier way to tax the public. I find it rather disturbing that more and more people are using less cash and having this chip will make things more convenient.

We all know that convenience is crucial in today's age of needing every minute to spare more time for the kids, their activities, our jobs and hobbies and all the entertainment we need to keep forgetting about the amazing world around us. We need to make more money to buy more shiny new thing and keep this dream alive!




posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 07:45 AM
link   
a reply to: Azureblue

Quite convenient, you don't even need your own hand to make payments, you could err borrow someone else's.

Cheers - Dave



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 08:05 AM
link   

originally posted by: bobs_uruncle
a reply to: Azureblue

Quite convenient, you don't even need your own hand to make payments, you could err borrow someone else's.

Exactly, or the chip itself 'cut out' and taped to your wrist.

Wondering too about 'upgrades' to systems and ultimately how many chips would be installed in a users wrist over the years. If the obsolescence rates were anything like cell phones, peoples wrists might become masses of scar tissue and infection.

lol, can't get that image out of my mind. You go to the ATM and theres a bloody hand on the ground at your feet.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 08:09 AM
link   
Well if your arm gets chopped off, because a crim knows you have an implant the I guess it would be an armed robbery, tish boom.

But in all seriousness, everyday debit and creditvcards have rfid chips in them for pass, i have put a hole punch to deactivate thr paypass copper coil in the card, now it no longer works. call me paranoid i do believe that thesecchips are merely tracking devices.

Though people love the convenience of paypass, look at i think it might be a visa tv ad, shown in Australia, where everyone uses paypass, and a guy wants to use cash and is frowned upon by everyone as he is going against the grain.

There are so many things at play here, ie the poeers that be want to ensure they can access your movements on numerous platforms to ensure if you leave your phone hime, you hsve a card or a watch.

I am probably just paranoid.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 08:25 AM
link   
a reply to: robsmith


Well if your arm gets chopped off, because a crim knows you have an implant the I guess it would be an armed robbery, fish boom.

Well give the man a hand!



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 08:32 AM
link   
a reply to: robsmith

You are paranoid.

Have you ever looked up at how exactly the chip works?

What difference is PayPass compared to regularly swiping your card? The data collected is the same.

The chip is completely inactive, it needs to be in very close proximity to the reader so it can get a small bit of electrical charge from it via induction, like an electric toothbrush.
edit on 23/6/15 by Chadwickus because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 08:55 AM
link   
a reply to: Chadwickus
i have checked out on how it works, I know that it is a proximity card to a degree. Though what if a nefarious person builds a receiver in the back of their van on the street, And ramps up the power to enable them to collect info from a distance of metres not centre metres.

Plus I can't be bothered dealing with disputes from my card provider if I do get ripped off. Hence the hold in the card, I prefer to insert it and use my pin.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 10:07 AM
link   
How would this prevent some barter situation or the use of precious metals? There is always some work around, be it tech or otherwise.

However, if this became mandatory over here in the states, that is the day I go completely off the grid. If enforcement gets militant, then I will disappear entirely. In no way would I go for this scenario. At that point I'll become a rogue criminal, a refugee in another country, a hermit or a hobo, whatever it will take to keep off the program. If a strong resistance movement gets started, I may join.

In such a situation I will probably die injured or starving and sick in some remote wilderness or killed because I'm labeled terrorist, but it will be my last stand against this cashless NWO bs. I would welcome that fate rather than give in. Live free or die as I probably only have 20 or so years left anyways.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 08:25 PM
link   

originally posted by: robsmith
And ramps up the power to enable them to collect info from a distance of metres not centre metres.


That's pretty much impossible to do. I think some Israeli students managed to get 28" out of one, but only by putting a metric crap ton of power through it and reading the card several thousand times, and correlating the data/noise mathematically with a DSP setup.

The problems are many. One is that the power from the exciter falls off as the sixth power of the distance. And, you detect the response from the card as a very small load being put on and off of the coil that's embedded in the card. So the more power you have to push through the exciter to power the thing, the worse the signal to noise ratio gets, and that's also a sixth power function. Imagine if you're trying to read a few uA of load change when you're applying 10mA of drive, that's bad enough, but if you're putting out 10A of drive and getting a few uA of load change, that's going to be damned near impossible to pick out.

NFC parts don't have any means for sorting through multiple targets in the interrogator field, either, since it's not something that would come up in normal operation. So you can't deal with some way to sit and read a lot of people at once anyway, as they'll all interfere with each other.

And in the end, you have the lambda wall. Past about a wavelength, you pass into the area of far field, and in that area, load signaling will not return any data to the exciter anyway, so for most cards you've got a hard limit about 13 meters away. That's further for lower frequency parts, of course. But past the lambda wall for any particular card, you will never be able to read one, no matter if you've got the Enterprise's sensor suite.



posted on Jun, 24 2015 @ 03:58 AM
link   
a reply to: Bedlam
Thanks for the info, I didn't realise the complexities to actually achieve what I had been led to believe. Though I still prefer old school way of using my card. I used to work for a big 4 here in Australia and it is do time consuming investigating credit card fraud. Plus also a hassle For the customer.

Money is sohard to earn so easy to lose.



posted on Jun, 24 2015 @ 04:02 AM
link   
Right give me ya wallet .....

ok then off with the hand....

Riouz



posted on Jun, 24 2015 @ 04:08 AM
link   
a reply to: robsmith

There's a lot of reasons for confusion.

A real problem is that there are many different types of RFID, all with differing abilities, yet the journalists invariably lump them all together as if anything one sort could do, another could as well. When they're not simply making # up or lying their asses off about it.

And very few journalists there are that understand it at all. Even sources you might otherwise think were authoritative seem to have not the slightest clue; BBC is the worst. I think DM has better science reporters, and that's pretty damned sad.

Amongst all of it there are any number of hucksters making a living off it, Katherine Albricht amongst them, who don't have a slightest clue about the subject yet have found that they can milk the masses with RFIDporn.



posted on Jun, 24 2015 @ 05:10 AM
link   

originally posted by: robsmith


i have put a hole punch to deactivate thr paypass copper coil in the card, now it no longer works. call me paranoid i do believe that thesecchips are merely tracking devices.

.


Thats very interesting, How do you know where to put the hole punch to get the tracking device only and not damage the useful bit.??

thanks



posted on Jun, 24 2015 @ 05:15 AM
link   
a reply to: Azureblue

There is no tracking device



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 01:17 AM
link   
Woman has hand chopped off in credit card theft.

I can assure you, server-side database recording is a possibility, at least where you transact.

New meaning to swipe my a*s as an ATM really

Yeah, I can see this being popular.

edit on 10-7-2015 by oilNGO because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 08:11 PM
link   
damna reply to: robsmith



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 08:12 PM
link   
yep a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck



new topics

top topics



 
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join