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NLBS #52: Stupid in California, or, How Excess and Environmentalists Caused The Drought.

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posted on Jun, 27 2015 @ 06:40 PM
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What really is painful is that the middle and lower class people of California don't really seem to care either. I live in a neighborhood of Los Angeles that is lower/middle class (also, we are undeniably on the edge of a desert here). No one talks about the drought. No one gets leaflets on their doors telling them how to save water (people don't necessarily watch network news anymore, or even have cable). No talk of 'yellow let it mellow, brown flush it down' like we did 25 years ago. No public education going on of any kind. I hear the sprinklers go on every single night still. I still see idiot dudes out there hosing down their stock Honda Civic with budget aftermarket rims for an hour in the dead heat. Still see people overwatering plants and lawns. There's just a lack of education and care going on that is really really sad.
edit on 27-6-2015 by okrian because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 28 2015 @ 05:58 PM
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a reply to: okrian


Very true. That's how a lot of the people there are -- apathetic. And, if you dare bring up your concerns they think you're whining and complaining (when that's not what you're doing) and they become annoyed, or worse angry and even hostile.

I used to live in LA and moved away yrs go mostly because of that mentality. But, wait until the SHTF and the tap runs dry, if that does happen, then the atmosphere of apathy will become one of anarchy.



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 08:12 AM
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a reply to: theNLBS

Thanks Joe, for broaching the topic. I've been enjoying the great content you've been providing us. Keep it up!

One place where the waters run deep in California for sure is in the arena of politicking over water. Owen's Valley is another example of this that I haven't heard mentioned yet in this thread. Guess where their water gets diverted to.

I am personally of the opinion that improper resource management is more to blame than lack of conservation. I think that, if the natural resources that California possesses were properly managed, it wouldn't have half the problem that it does. Too bad the politicians can't seem to manage this basic element of promoting the general welfare.



posted on Jun, 29 2015 @ 11:13 PM
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Think of all those environmentally friendly climate change advocate hollywood movies stars that keep their multimillion dollar estate lawns beautifully manicured. . .



posted on Jul, 1 2015 @ 08:39 PM
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a reply to: Indigent

It's not stupidity. Its callousness. Seems the more money you have the more callous to others you are.



posted on Jul, 5 2015 @ 06:29 AM
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People who water their pavements or clear leaves and rubbish from the ground using a garden hose should be shot on sight.



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 12:13 PM
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a reply to: theNLBS

Why is this the primary topic? This is the least important subject right now.



posted on Jul, 11 2015 @ 09:57 AM
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a reply to: theNLBS

I wonder if you/we aren't taking the wrong tack, here. Perhaps conservation is being overhyped, when we should be looking into more innovative methods of water management. Capturing a small percentqage of the state's coastal runoff and piping it under the coastal mountain range to resorvoirs inland of those cloud busting mountains is one approach that could help solve the problem. I believe the idea's been 'floated' before, only to get 'flushed' due to the political obstacles.

Let's not forget that there is a lot of money to be made delivering water, and even more if it is scarce.

Let's also not forget that evaporation is how clouds are formed. The draining of Owen's Lake to feed Los Angeles' thirst is a good example of how developments might have unintended consequences. Before it's draining, Owen's was a huge lake that was only inches deep under much of its surface. A rather robust evaporation bed. We would do well managing our resources to restore evaporation beds such as this, or replace or augment them with something comparable. Resorvoirs inland of the coastal range could help to encourage rainfall, and could go a long way to reducing the shortage.

Of course, solving the water scarcity problem in California would probably cost someone some hefty profits, so I think that any true solution will likely encounter significant political pressure.
edit on 11-7-2015 by engineercutout because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2017 @ 02:56 AM
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a reply to: 6Taco6Smell6

Why?,the hottest recorded tempeture in history was in California,the Palm desert is as hot,I lived in Ahwatukee for 2 yrs,only difference more pale white people in Az,think they would go out in sun in winter,weird bunch




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