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Other Countries Change Their Gun Laws After Mass Shootings. Why Not America?

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posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:27 AM
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a reply to: MysterX

The whole country has built it's XXIth century identity on fear. Fear was used in various political campaigns because fear sells and allows to pass freedom-restricting bills. Fear sells TV shows. Fear sells guns.

When a whole generation has been raised and educated in a climate (real or imaginary) of fear, no wonder they tend to truly believe the law of the wild west is still the only law in the US.

Shoot first talk later, because if you don't do it the guy in front of you will shoot you first.

That's the mentality taught to everyone in the US. That's what they genuinely believe today. This can't even be questioned anymore, this is the normal way to view US society now.




posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:31 AM
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originally posted by: network dude
Could you point out the differences in US gun laws? Other than Full auto


Surely prohibiting full-auto weapons and doing more background checks are minor differences and absolutely not some of the only things gun proponents have been asking... Really minor differences...

whatever.
edit on 22-6-2015 by JUhrman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:32 AM
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originally posted by: JUhrman
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Almost? Then why are Americans mad when there are mention of prohibiting automatic weapons and restricting sales in case of psychiatric background?

This is exactly what gun control proponents are asking.

Once again, more gun control =/= gun grabbing so why all the butthurt reactions when mentioning gun control laws?


I think you are confused as to what 'gun control' is about. There are already laws in place to protect the public from guns rising up and staging war against the people. So far, the guns are behaving nicely. Unfortunately, some people have decided to go against those laws and use guns to break other laws. So more laws aren't really the issue. If we could get the people to stop breaking the existing laws, I think all of this could be silenced. Please let me know what you think about all that.



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:33 AM
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originally posted by: JUhrman
Surely prohibiting full-auto weapons and doing more background checks are minor differences...


Once more, you cannot purchase a fully automatic weapon by just walking into a gun store and every time you purchase a weapon a background check is made.



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:34 AM
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originally posted by: JUhrman

originally posted by: network dude
Could you point out the differences in US gun laws? Other than Full auto


Surely prohibiting full-auto weapons and doing more background checks are minor differences and absolutely not some of the only things gun proponents have been asking... Really minor differences...

whatever.


Could you point out where full auto weapons were used in an incident in the US?



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:36 AM
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a reply to: JUhrman

This is so wildly hyperbolic and ignorant it's funny.

Base an opinion of an entire nation of some 300 million people off the actions of a comparative handful of people. And what you think gun control advocates are asking for? It's already in law.

Get off YouTube.



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:37 AM
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originally posted by: NavyDoc
Probably because most anti-gun rights people such as yourself cannot tell the difference between automatic (already largely illegal without special federal licensing and has been since the NFA of 1934) and semi-automatic.



Fallacy. Assault weapons are not largely illegal in the US, nor are permits largely mandatory to buy guns.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:39 AM
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originally posted by: JUhrman
a reply to: MysterX

The whole country has built it's XXIth century identity on fear. Fear was used in various political campaigns because fear sells and allows to pass freedom-restricting bills. Fear sells TV shows. Fear sells guns.

When a whole generation has been raised and educated in a climate (real or imaginary) of fear, no wonder they tend to truly believe the law of the wild west is still the only law in the US.

Shoot first talk later, because if you don't do it the guy in front of you will shoot you first.

That's the mentality taught to everyone in the US. That's what they genuinely believe today. This can't even be questioned anymore, this is the normal way to view US society now.


Since you've already demonstrated a lot of ignorance about US gun laws, I'm not surprised you demonstrate a lot of ignorance of the psyche of the people in the US.



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:39 AM
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originally posted by: JUhrman
Assault weapons are not largely illegal in the US...


Define 'assault weapon'.



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:42 AM
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a reply to: JUhrman

I tend to think it stems more from Americans having lived under the yoke of tyranny, had a taste of what being defenceless was all about, and after kicking us Brits out in the 18th century, made laws that ensured the people would not suffer such living conditions under any future government again.

The other things, like pioneering dangers of the time mandated gun ownership...no gun meant almost certain death.

In many parts of the US...that sentiment is still in evidence.

But essentially, the rights to gun ownership and the desire to possess one or more guns all stems from Americans being subjugated, abused and ultimately freed from tyranny because of the guns in public hands...America was literally born through the use of private gun ownership.



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:45 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

I'm not going to # ants with you nitpickers.

You guys just want the status quo and you know it. You will resort to any kind of sophism to avoid having to re-examine current laws.

One poster used Switzerland's example to compare it to the US. I explained why it's a fallacy because the Swiss laws are quite different from the US ones.



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:46 AM
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originally posted by: JUhrman

originally posted by: NavyDoc
Probably because most anti-gun rights people such as yourself cannot tell the difference between automatic (already largely illegal without special federal licensing and has been since the NFA of 1934) and semi-automatic.



Fallacy. Assault weapons are not largely illegal in the US, nor are permits largely mandatory to buy guns.

en.wikipedia.org...


From your own link that you provided:


NFA weapons are weapons that are heavily restricted at a federal level by the National Firearms Act of 1934 and the Firearm Owners Protection Act of 1986. These include automatic firearms (such as machine guns), short-barreled shotguns, and short-barreled rifles. Some states and localities place additional restrictions on such weapons.


You haven't a clue, do you?

"Assault weapons" are not a technical term. They are semi-auto firearms that work just like every other semi-auto firearm but just look scary to panty-waists. They are not machine guns. They are not, as you wrongly claimed "automatic weapons," and they, being semi-automatic, are just as easy to own in Switzerland as they are in the US.

Just like the Swiss, most US states require a purchase permit to buy a handgun.
Just like the Swiss, most US states do not require a purchase permit to buy a long arm, including scary semi-auto rifles.
Just like the Swiss, you don't need a permit or a background check for a private transfer of a gun from one individual to another.

Some states and cities , like New York, California,MAryland, Mass, Washington D.C., Chicago, etc have even STRICTER gun rules than the Swiss--see how little crime LA and Chicago and Baltimore have? (Sarcasm).



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:46 AM
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originally posted by: JUhrman
One poster used Switzerland's example to compare it to the US. I explained why it's a fallacy because the Swiss laws are quite different from the US ones.


Actually, you did not as they are quite similar.



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:47 AM
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originally posted by: JUhrman
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

I'm not going to # ants with you nitpickers.

You guys just want the status quo and you know it. You will resort to any kind of sophism to avoid having to re-examine current laws.

One poster used Switzerland's example to compare it to the US. I explained why it's a fallacy because the Swiss laws are quite different from the US ones.


And we've demonstrated how wrong you were.



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:48 AM
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originally posted by: network dude

originally posted by: JUhrman

originally posted by: network dude
Could you point out the differences in US gun laws? Other than Full auto


Surely prohibiting full-auto weapons and doing more background checks are minor differences and absolutely not some of the only things gun proponents have been asking... Really minor differences...

whatever.


Could you point out where full auto weapons were used in an incident in the US?


Since he does not even know the difference, he will be unable.

Here is a link to a Swiss gun store: www.gunshopschweiz.ch... ategory=17

See all the AR-15's? AK-47 types for sale? All semi auto. All available over the counter without a purchase permit with only an ID and a background check JUST LIKE IN THE US.
edit on 22-6-2015 by NavyDoc because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:49 AM
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originally posted by: MysterX
a reply to: JUhrman

I tend to think it stems more from Americans having lived under the yoke of tyranny, had a taste of what being defenceless was all about, and after kicking us Brits out in the 18th century, made laws that ensured the people would not suffer such living conditions under any future government again.

The other things, like pioneering dangers of the time mandated gun ownership...no gun meant almost certain death.

In many parts of the US...that sentiment is still in evidence.

But essentially, the rights to gun ownership and the desire to possess one or more guns all stems from Americans being subjugated, abused and ultimately freed from tyranny because of the guns in public hands...America was literally born through the use of private gun ownership.



The exact same things happened in many countries in Europe. Actually the French revolution is all about the same thing and inspired the Americans.


So why didn't the French follow the same path later, and why do they hate guns today?


Because it's not the only explanation and there is much more to it. Especially lobbying. Just like there was lobbying to support cigarettes.
edit on 22-6-2015 by JUhrman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:54 AM
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originally posted by: JUhrman

originally posted by: MysterX
a reply to: JUhrman

I tend to think it stems more from Americans having lived under the yoke of tyranny, had a taste of what being defenceless was all about, and after kicking us Brits out in the 18th century, made laws that ensured the people would not suffer such living conditions under any future government again.

The other things, like pioneering dangers of the time mandated gun ownership...no gun meant almost certain death.

In many parts of the US...that sentiment is still in evidence.

But essentially, the rights to gun ownership and the desire to possess one or more guns all stems from Americans being subjugated, abused and ultimately freed from tyranny because of the guns in public hands...America was literally born through the use of private gun ownership.



The exact same things happened in many countries in Europe. Actually the French revolution is all about the same thing and inspired the Americans.


So why didn't the French follow the same path later, and why do they hate guns today?


Because it's not the only explanation and there is much more to it. Especially lobbying. Just like there was lobbying to support cigarettes.


Uh, the French Revolution came AFTER the American Revolution. The American revolution ended in 1783 and the French revolution didn't even begin until 1789.

WE inspired THEM.

You forget that the revolution did not last long and then France became a dictatorship under the Napoleonic Emperors again.

You are actually trying to school people on history with such a poor grasp of it demonstrated?



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 07:56 AM
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originally posted by: JUhrman
The exact same things happened in many countries in Europe. Actually the French revolution is all about the same thing and inspired the Americans.


Is that so? How did something in 1789 inspire us in 1776?



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 08:02 AM
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a reply to: JUhrman

You're actually arguing for a valid reason to own guns in America, rather than the opposite, even if you didn't realise it as so.

Think about it...the French used private weapons to oust the ruling elite classes...(although many were not firearms, being axes, lances, swords and so on...but still), after the revolution, the French succumbed to a false sense of security, an apathy if you will.

Which of course led to being once again subjugated by the ruling classes...and having their weapons taken away, by those ruling classes who'd much rather keep their heads attached to their necks.

Americans don't want to make the same mistake as the French did...preferring to keep their weapons handy.



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 08:09 AM
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originally posted by: JUhrman



You guys just want the status quo and you know it.





This is where you would be wrong, at least about what I want.
I would like to see some existing gun laws overturned.
We have went too far with restrictive gun laws already.
edit on b000000302015-06-22T08:11:34-05:0008America/ChicagoMon, 22 Jun 2015 08:11:34 -0500800000015 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



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