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Strange "fish rain" witnessed in the Gollamudi village

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posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 01:28 PM
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Mysterious rain in AP
odishasamaya.com...


A strange fish rain in the Gollamudi village of Nandigama Mandal near Vijayawada shocked the villagers early in the morning yesterday. Hundreds of fish ‘rained from the sky and fell in the fields of the villagers, who collected them excitedly from their waterlogged fields and took them home.

As per the villagers, fish belonging to the Vallaga species and in varying sizes of 4 to 6 inches fell from the clouds along with the heavy downpour in the Friday morning.

The jubilance was such that the villagers even informed people belonging to their neighboring villages, who rushed to the fields on the outskirts of Gollamudi.

According to an environmentalist, fish rain is due to the displacement caused during rain and strong gales or tornados. The water from nearby rivers, canals, and fish tanks get displaced due to heavy wind and that fish does not fall from the sky.

Apparently, similar fish rain occurred in the 1970s in Srikakulam and Vizianagaram and often occur in foreign countries.


It's raining fish in this village!
www.delhidailynews.com...





Recently the residents of Gollamudi village near Nandigama in India woke to a strange incident of fish raining down from the sky. Farmers of the village reported that fish had simply rained down from the sky.

Although there were no witnesses to it, farmers who went to their fields this morning saw fish squirming around in their fields.

Local people assumed that fish has rained down from the sky since there is no water body nearby. Interestingly, the fish were not of any local variety.

One assumption to explain such reports is that tornadoes build waterspouts and occasionally pick up creatures and transport them long distances before finally discarding them.

Another assumption is that the fish may have fallen into canals with the discharge of water from upstream reservoirs.




posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 01:33 PM
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Of course, Charles Fort pointed out decades ago that these rains commonly involve single species of fish, frogs, or whatever. A storm, cyclone, or waterspout is not selective.



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 01:37 PM
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originally posted by: Lazarus Short
Of course, Charles Fort pointed out decades ago that these rains commonly involve single species of fish, frogs, or whatever. A storm, cyclone, or waterspout is not selective.


If a waterspout or cyclone is NOT selective, how is one species of fish picked up and dropped? Charles Fort From that link, that I found in a National Geographic story, It never says Charles Fort decided that only 1 species of fish would fall. He simply investigated falls of fish, larvae, frogs and such and he quotes Judge C.B. Montgomery from 1921 in an article in 1926.
edit on 20-6-2015 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 01:40 PM
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a reply to: reldra

Your guess is as good as mine. Nobody really knows how this happens, just that it does.

Oh, and thanks, Lazarus Short, for pointing this out.



edit on 6/20/2015 by wtbengineer because: to add



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 01:46 PM
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I saw this happen in Louisiana when I was a kid. Everyone I've told about it thought I was making it up or hallucinating. Hell for a while there even I questioned my own recollection.



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 01:48 PM
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originally posted by: reldra

originally posted by: Lazarus Short
Of course, Charles Fort pointed out decades ago that these rains commonly involve single species of fish, frogs, or whatever. A storm, cyclone, or waterspout is not selective.


If a waterspout or cyclone is NOT selective, how is one species of fish picked up and dropped?


That is the point. A waterspout should pick up any assortment of critters. It makes the waterspout theory hold less water per se.



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 01:52 PM
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a reply to: Lazarus Short

As a matter of fact, the fish rain I witnessed was a single species of little 3 - 4 inch silver fish. Weird huh?



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 01:54 PM
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originally posted by: Halfswede

originally posted by: reldra

originally posted by: Lazarus Short
Of course, Charles Fort pointed out decades ago that these rains commonly involve single species of fish, frogs, or whatever. A storm, cyclone, or waterspout is not selective.


If a waterspout or cyclone is NOT selective, how is one species of fish picked up and dropped?


That is the point. A waterspout should pick up any assortment of critters. It makes the waterspout theory hold less water per se.
I wasn't replying to the OP. I was replying to someone else who stated something that Charles Fort never said.
edit on 20-6-2015 by reldra because: (no reason given)
I agree it can pick up an assortment of small animals and things.
edit on 20-6-2015 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 01:58 PM
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a reply to: reldra

My bad.. literally took you out of context.



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 01:59 PM
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a reply to: Halfswede

I didn't word it as clearly as I should have. I went a little far on my research of Charles Fort, lol.



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 02:01 PM
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originally posted by: Bone75
a reply to: Lazarus Short

As a matter of fact, the fish rain I witnessed was a single species of little 3 - 4 inch silver fish. Weird huh?


I was once driving home and at the time, about 1989, I lived in the woods outside West Plains, Missouri. Anyway, I was driving home about midnight, in the rain, in December. It was unusually warm, and I kept seeing frogs on the blacktop road. I never knew if they woke up from the unseasonal temperatures, or came down in the rain.



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 02:02 PM
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a reply to: reldra

Ah, National Geographic - but did you read his books?



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 02:24 PM
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originally posted by: Lazarus Short
a reply to: reldra

Ah, National Geographic - but did you read his books?

I went from National geographic to pages directly about him. No, Amazon doesn't have drone delivery to me yet. I just dug deeper than the original article.



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 05:43 PM
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a reply to: Skywatcher2011

Most often they are all the same size and the same type even when it is just pieces of meat. it seems to be increasing if you look it up, I think the program is breaking down


www.naturalhistorymag.com...



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 05:50 PM
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a reply to: Skywatcher2011

They were still wriggling? they should have been frozen and dead. Sounds like a time displacement.



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 09:02 PM
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I thought this was a weird phenomenon personally...you don't hear about this too often but if there was evidence of water spouts in the area around the same time fish were deposited into the village that would be something to believe.

Until then it can be speculation how these water species arrived there...unless a water bomber was dumping the fish in water over the drought area from above the clouds??? Just a thought.



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 09:21 PM
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Manna from heaven....or correctly minnows from heaven.



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 10:27 PM
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a reply to: reldra

Charles Fort wrote several books dealing with in part falls of critters, "blood" and ice chunks and other materials. My old paperbacks are LO!, Book of the Damned and New Lands. He made many of us conspiracy freaks back when "science-fiction" was almost a dirty word and "flying saucers" were hard to rationalize.



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 10:38 AM
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I wrote this years ago, a poem excerpted from "The Book of the Damned":

MELANICUS

the Prince of Dark Bodies: Melanicus
most likely one of the spores of the Evil One
sun spot, maybe
he obscures a star - he shoves a comet

vast black thing like a crow
poised over the moon
the things have been seen
also…their shadows

one looks up at the sky - consternation
its concomitants: lights in the sky
fall of a black substance
shocks like those of an earthquake
“panic seized the whole city”

throttle and disregard the howls of the planets
vast and black
the thing that was poised like a crow over the moon

round and smooth cannon balls
things that have fallen from the sky to this earth
our slippery brains
things like cannon balls have fallen in storms upon this earth
like cannon balls are things that in storms have fallen to this earth
showers of blood
showers of blood
showers of blood

[Perhaps it's relevant to the thread.]



posted on Jun, 22 2015 @ 11:15 AM
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originally posted by: Bone75
a reply to: Lazarus Short

As a matter of fact, the fish rain I witnessed was a single species of little 3 - 4 inch silver fish. Weird huh?


I've seen it with frogs. We collected hundreds of them, and they were little tree frogs, so they stuck everywhere. You just watched them stuck to the windows with the rain.

In this case, the storm we had was unusual, in both its direction and intensity. It was the one day all the frogs of that species were growing out of the water.
The storm was blowing right over the marsh, and picking the little guys up.

I think you'll find the one species thing is simply explained by the species behavior. For whatever reason, they are schooled or collected or confined at the surface of the water, and that is why they get picked up in numbers.

It's an unfortunate case of swarm meets storm. Quite a sight to behold.



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