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F-35 goes to Green Flag

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posted on Jun, 19 2015 @ 08:19 AM
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This isn't the first time that the aircraft has gone to Green Flag, but it's the first time it's played a starring role. Two F-35As from Edwards flew to Nellis on multiple occasions, sometimes on the same day, usually armed with a single GBU-31, and a pair of GBU-12s mounted internally. The flights occurred over 10 days, without a single F-35 "loss".

Of course detractors are saying it was all a stunt and was rigged so there wouldn't be any to make the aircraft look better. That would be pretty dumb though, in that it would degrade the training for everyone involved, and Green Flag and Red Flag are designed to be as hard as possible on participants.


Not a single F-35 was “shot down” during the joint-force Green Flag exercises testing the jet and its pilots’ prowess operating it in a contested air-support role in the Western U.S. this month, according to U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Cameron Dadgar, head of the exercise and leader of the 549th Combat Training Sqdn. at Nellis AFB, Nevada.

This is notable because A-10s and F-16s were defeated in the same conditions, operating in an environment with hostile aircraft and surface-to-air missiles, he said. USAF officials suggest this validates the theory of Air Force leaders that sacrificing weapons load for stealth in the F-35’s design proved solid, at least for these mission sets. Skeptics, however, say the exercise was a public relations stunt designed to sell the jet as the service continues its uphill battle to convince Congress and others that the aircraft will be a sufficient replacement for the F-15E, F-16 and A-10 for future close air support (CAS) missions.

Therein lies the dichotomy between dialogs in the capitols of nations buying the Lockheed Martin F-35 and operators receiving it for training. The latter appear to be at least satisfied with the early, nascent capabilities provided by the F-35A Block 2B jets used in Green Flag, and operators are working to hone pilot skills in employing the jet. By contrast, discussions in Washington—as well as at the Paris Air Show—are focused on constantly justifying the existence of the F-35, the most costly weapons program in Pentagon history. Program managers are aiming to lower the cost of the jet (about $100 million per copy) and boost production numbers as well as defend its incrementally increasing capabilities.

aviationweek.com...




posted on Jun, 19 2015 @ 09:49 PM
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Now thats good news...that proves it works as a strike platform but to me there is a Mark Twain saying...The best swordsman in the world doesn't need to fear the second best swordsman in the world; no, the person for him to be afraid of is some ignorant antagonist who has never had a sword in his hand before; he doesn't do the thing he ought to do, and so the expert isn't prepared for him.



posted on Jun, 19 2015 @ 10:42 PM
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So it survived intrusion against defensive forces. Did it undertake any offensive actions?



posted on Jun, 19 2015 @ 10:46 PM
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a reply to: paradoxious

Multiple times. The point of Green Flag is to work with ground units, performing the CAS role, which is exactly what it did on every mission.



posted on Jun, 19 2015 @ 11:34 PM
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I think making the F-35B & C with no internal gun will be a mistake for the CAS role and for air to air, reminded of the F-4 Phantom, seems like the same mistake has been made again.
Just read a good article on the F-35 and the Chinese copy the J-31 has no lift fan which makes the body wider and less aerodynamic, so apparently the Chinese one will have better flight performance.
The article was how the marines ruined the F-35 lol.



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 12:02 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: paradoxious

Multiple times. The point of Green Flag is to work with ground units, performing the CAS role, which is exactly what it did on every mission.
My ill thought out post was meant to provoke thought: that the F-35 did so well evading hostile defenses yet no mention was made regarding its efficacy in offensive situations.

So, was it able to release any ordinance against said targets, and what was the success ratio?



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 12:09 AM
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a reply to: JimTSpockexactly....that's where us gunfighters came from.....the f-4's when they put 20's on 'em....



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 12:27 AM
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a reply to: paradoxious

Yes it released ordnance, standard load was a 2,000 lb weapon, and two 500 lb weapons. They haven't released performance details on the accuracy or anything of that sort.



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 12:30 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: paradoxious

... They haven't released performance details on the accuracy or anything of that sort.
Nor do I think they would.



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 12:33 AM
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a reply to: paradoxious

They rarely do to the public, for any aircraft. Especially considering the last Green Flag only ended about a week ago, so they're still in the post exercise analysis of all the units.



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 01:37 AM
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So what another machine developed to KILL!


Good old US of Whatever at it's best!



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 01:44 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: paradoxious

Yes it released ordnance, standard load was a 2,000 lb weapon, and two 500 lb weapons. They haven't released performance details on the accuracy or anything of that sort.


That seems like a lot of money into R&D, design, testing, manufacture, trouble shooting, training, ect ect to let loose three ordinance packages.



posted on Jun, 20 2015 @ 04:31 AM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

"Standard load". They were flying multiple sorties a day, carrying that load.




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