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Agent Orange a bit too late for many

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posted on Jun, 19 2015 @ 06:58 AM
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As a Vietnam Veteran stationed overseas in Thailand during the war, Agent Orange was kind of a thing in the closet that you quite didn't open the door to. My guts are hurting as a Veteran, but this little update just shows you how Veterans are cast aside and forgotten "until" it is , to a political advantage,to whom, I don't know. Please parents, if your children join the US military, which I do encourage, let them know one thing, think for themselves about their own safety while serving in the United States military. And most importantly, speak up. America is a free country which of, if you "do speak up , you are not going to lose your life, type of country".

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posted on Jun, 19 2015 @ 07:06 AM
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a reply to: musicismagic

I've got one uncle that this is about 20 years too late for. He told me that they used to dump whatever was left in the tanks at the end of the runway and how he used to end his day as an ordnance loader covered with it.

Then he got about five different types of cancer, beat them one by one, but finally one got him.



posted on Jun, 19 2015 @ 07:51 AM
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Over 40 years after the war ended, now they figure Agent Orange may not have been safe. And people can't understand why some people are leery of today's vaccines.

I would not recommend that parents allow their children to join the US military at this time. First of all, I feel if someone isn't old enough to decide to buy a beer then they aren't old enough to understand the possible consequences of joining the military. Either lower the drinking age or increase the enlistment age.

Second, an impartial lawyer should be required to explain the terms of the enlistment contract. I think nearly everyone who signs up would be surprised by some of the things they are agreeing to. You are basically signing yourself into slavery. Any promise made by a recruiter is non-binding. They are not even legally required to pay you.

Finally, a short course in how the US treats its service members and veterans should be mandatory. Potential service members should be aware of things like the Tuskegee Airmen, Agent Orange, Veteran's hospitals, and others.

The fact that the US seems to need multiple charities to help veterans speaks volumes.



posted on Jun, 19 2015 @ 07:52 AM
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originally posted by: Bedlam
a reply to: musicismagic

I've got one uncle that this is about 20 years too late for. He told me that they used to dump whatever was left in the tanks at the end of the runway and how he used to end his day as an ordnance loader covered with it.

Then he got about five different types of cancer, beat them one by one, but finally one got him.


So sorry to hear that.

As you know, now we have the Iraqi war medical problems. It is just so sad. But at my age, I know one thing. Don't trust any mofker that send you to fight in another country that is not attacking your country. Get it, you politicians that are reading this. You are bought and sold your worthless soul just to keep in power.



posted on Jun, 19 2015 @ 08:00 AM
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originally posted by: VictorVonDoom
Over 40 years after the war ended, now they figure Agent Orange may not have been safe. And people can't understand why some people are leery of today's vaccines.

I would not recommend that parents allow their children to join the US military at this time. First of all, I feel if someone isn't old enough to decide to buy a beer then they aren't old enough to understand the possible consequences of joining the military. Either lower the drinking age or increase the enlistment age.

Second, an impartial lawyer should be required to explain the terms of the enlistment contract. I think nearly everyone who signs up would be surprised by some of the things they are agreeing to. You are basically signing yourself into slavery. Any promise made by a recruiter is non-binding. They are not even legally required to pay you.

Finally, a short course in how the US treats its service members and veterans should be mandatory. Potential service members should be aware of things like the Tuskegee Airmen, Agent Orange, Veteran's hospitals, and others.

The fact that the US seems to need multiple charities to help veterans speaks volumes.



The charities abound and I thank you for bringing that up. With the internet it is very easy now to find out which charities are local and really give like, well I don't really know, but many are just home based and give a helping hand. There is much more help for us Veterans these days, but the system is really overloaded, just like the tent cities in Oahu these days. It is serious people, just look at any "skid row streets" in America. That speaks for itself.



posted on Jun, 19 2015 @ 08:06 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

I lost an uncle too a couple of years ago but not to cancer. He served in Vietnam as a nurse even as such he was exposed to a hell of a lot of Agent Orange. In his 50's he developed a form of dementia that doesn't even have a name, they called it early onset, acute, aggressive dementia... he was 62 when his body was no longer able to function and he passed. One of his doctors suggested it was due to his exposure to Agent Orange.



posted on Jun, 19 2015 @ 08:10 AM
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originally posted by: Kali74
a reply to: Bedlam

I lost an uncle too a couple of years ago but not to cancer. He served in Vietnam as a nurse even as such he was exposed to a hell of a lot of Agent Orange. In his 50's he developed a form of dementia that doesn't even have a name, they called it early onset, acute, aggressive dementia... he was 62 when his body was no longer able to function and he passed. One of his doctors suggested it was due to his exposure to Agent Orange.



I believe it.



posted on Jun, 19 2015 @ 09:12 AM
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a reply to: musicismagic

My husband lost his older sibling to lymphomic cancer 5 months ago. He was front line in Nam. Too late for him too.

God Bless America....someone needs to.



posted on Jun, 19 2015 @ 10:28 AM
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I took a class in high school that was entirely devoted to the History of the Vietnam war. My teacher was a vet, and an amazing man. The last day of class he shared some of his stories with us, and I remember them vividly.

More related to the OP, we had to do a project of interviewing a veteran and we compiled a book of stories. My group was assigned to a woman who was a top secret stenographer. Though she was in an office, she still fell victim to Agent Orange. She had a few types of cancer, and believed it was responsible for her daughter and grand daughter having cancer.




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