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Mars pyramid - Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 978 (2015-05-07 23:22:33 UTC)

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posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 02:01 PM
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originally posted by: TinfoilTP
Since there are boulders next to it nearby that are larger, I'd say it is a rock.


This one time, I visited a stone building in the Sierra Nevadas.

It was surrounded by boulders larger than any shaped stone in the building.

Was the building a rock?

(I'm just pointing out that the logic you used makes no sense).




posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 02:02 PM
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a reply to: game over man


...we know that advanced life could not have naturally evolved there because of the relatively short time frame Mars had an atmosphere.

Do we KNOW that? Or is it just considered the highest probability with the information we have at present?
We're assuming that evolution takes the same amount of time on another planet that it did here. We can't say that for sure, no matter how logical it sounds. Different planet. Different conditions.


The only conclusion would be that Aliens wanted to show off their power by building structures on Mars that would last billions of years on a inhabitable planet.

I don't think that's the only conclusion we can come to. Maybe it was an outpost, since we're speculating anyway.

I think our problem is extremes. We need a balanced look at possibilities from both ends of the spectrum. I have my own personal views on Mars, but I'm open to all possibilities.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 02:04 PM
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originally posted by: Indigent


how big it is?


Probably the size of a small ant nest.

Neat looking stone, today i was in a store with cubic minerals, i could not believe they were natural



Really who can believe they are natural...

Excellent post Indigent. Sold for $30, eh? Definitely makes one think, doesn't it?



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 02:11 PM
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originally posted by: raedar
a reply to: game over man

Feel free to start a thread and take the topic in any direction you'd like! I think the beauty of ATS is that there is a variety of perspective rather than one way of viewing topics.


We are also here to DENY IGNORANCE , Google ventifact images and you will see what a cold dry windswept environment can do to rocks.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 02:14 PM
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a reply to: Klassified


Have a look here Mars Cold Dry Past


One study reveals that a region rich in the mineral olivine - which suggests it is has been "dry" for about 3 billion years - is actually four times larger than previously thought. That adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting Mars was mostly cold and dry - and not warm and wet - in the past.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 02:17 PM
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Ive added some lines to show the angles I saw when I zoomed in. Looks like more than one pyramid, and multiple right angles!!!




posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 02:35 PM
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I wish nasa would stop giving us red hue images and pure true raw untouched images, but that not going to happen , mars has an blue sky and sparse clouds, these guys are decades ahead of us and drip feed us cattle stuff as the wish.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 02:42 PM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey

originally posted by: TinfoilTP
Since there are boulders next to it nearby that are larger, I'd say it is a rock.


This one time, I visited a stone building in the Sierra Nevadas.

It was surrounded by boulders larger than any shaped stone in the building.

Was the building a rock?

(I'm just pointing out that the logic you used makes no sense).


It is a single piece and smaller than the other single stones around it. Not a building.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 02:43 PM
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originally posted by: wmd_2008
a reply to: Klassified


Have a look here Mars Cold Dry Past


One study reveals that a region rich in the mineral olivine - which suggests it is has been "dry" for about 3 billion years - is actually four times larger than previously thought. That adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting Mars was mostly cold and dry - and not warm and wet - in the past.


Good stuff. Thanks for posting. What I'm saying is, until we set foot on that planet, there are too many variables we can't account for. So the best we can do is go with the highest probability from the data we have. Which is what we are doing. As usual though, there will always be new data that will change what we think we know at present.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 02:47 PM
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I found one of those.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 02:50 PM
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originally posted by: raedar
a reply to: howmuch4another


Also, are we to assume the cameras on the rover are always perfectly parallel to the horizon? What happens when the rover traverses a hill? Honest question, I have no idea.



I don't assume they are always parallel. I don't know if the RSM has any leveling capability either. I know it doesn't sit on a gimbal but maybe internal camera gimbals are possible. I assumed the pic was a hillside due to the background. Just my own observation.

edit on 6/18/2015 by howmuch4another because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 03:13 PM
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originally posted by: Klassified

originally posted by: wmd_2008
a reply to: Klassified


Have a look here Mars Cold Dry Past


One study reveals that a region rich in the mineral olivine - which suggests it is has been "dry" for about 3 billion years - is actually four times larger than previously thought. That adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting Mars was mostly cold and dry - and not warm and wet - in the past.



And theres no guarantee we're going with the highest probability on any of that data. "We" as ordinary citizens are "going with" what we are told about Mars. NASA know that they can pretty much tell us anything and we have no way of checking their accuracy. They could easily be hiding things from us and we would be none the wiser.
Good stuff. Thanks for posting. What I'm saying is, until we set foot on that planet, there are too many variables we can't account for. So the best we can do is go with the highest probability from the data we have. Which is what we are doing. As usual though, there will always be new data that will change what we think we know at present.


ETA screwed pooch on this quote & reply. On my mobile. Apologies.
edit on 18-6-2015 by Urantia1111 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: raedar

I read the thread title and literally said out loud; "great, another rock to not get excited about"
Looked at the pic and was like "Holy 5hit! Wtf is that?!?"
Is this real? I'm gonna go through the replies right now!



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: howmuch4another








posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 03:15 PM
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originally posted by: raedar
a reply to: game over man

Feel free to start a thread and take the topic in any direction you'd like! I think the beauty of ATS is that there is a variety of perspective rather than one way of viewing topics.


I have made so many outside the box thinking threads, you are completely wrong with your assumption about me. Speaking of variety of perspectives look at the post directly above this one. Literally a different perspective of the rock in question.
edit on 18-6-2015 by game over man because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: intergalactic fire

oops images are to big
well here are the links for those who want to check out wider views of the area.

1

2

3


pyramid hmmm, yeah why not


edit on 18-6-2015 by intergalactic fire because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 03:19 PM
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originally posted by: game over man
Rocks shaped like pyramids or partially shaped like pyramids are common too. I highly suggest visiting a river or a beach sometime soon.


I didn't realise this, can you share a source as you sound so sure of this? Yes I could google 'natural pyramid rock formations' but do you have another source? As in where you have seen these?
Thanks.

Edit: For the record, I just googled 'natural pyramid rock formations' and couldn't find an image better than the OP. I only went through the first 3 pages, but still.. I thought there would be more images to 'prove' that natural pyramid formations are common on Earth.
edit on 18/6/15 by OpenEars123 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 03:26 PM
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Ok ok I'm one of the posters that is pretty dumbfounded by this. However, I was studying the pic further and noticed the shadow doesn't really match up. It's kinda curved. This is just an observation and may be easily explained. Can anyone elaborate on this?
Thanks.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: Urantia1111


And theres no guarantee we're going with the highest probability on any of that data. "We" as ordinary citizens are "going with" what we are told about Mars. NASA know that they can pretty much tell us anything and we have no way of checking their accuracy. They could easily be hiding things from us and we would be none the wiser.

Agreed.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 03:41 PM
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originally posted by: Klassified
a reply to: game over man


...we know that advanced life could not have naturally evolved there because of the relatively short time frame Mars had an atmosphere.

Do we KNOW that? Or is it just considered the highest probability with the information we have at present?
We're assuming that evolution takes the same amount of time on another planet that it did here. We can't say that for sure, no matter how logical it sounds. Different planet. Different conditions.


The only conclusion would be that Aliens wanted to show off their power by building structures on Mars that would last billions of years on a inhabitable planet.

I don't think that's the only conclusion we can come to. Maybe it was an outpost, since we're speculating anyway.

I think our problem is extremes. We need a balanced look at possibilities from both ends of the spectrum. I have my own personal views on Mars, but I'm open to all possibilities.


Your first point about evolution is interesting. How similar is Mars to Earth? Mars is farther away from the Sun, do you think that would speed up evolution or slow it down? Mars has has a longer orbital period and less gravity do you think that would speed up evolution or slow it down? Human evolution might be speeding up with technology and medicine but how about a different location in the solar system, what factors would be necessary for a faster evolution without advances in technology and medicine?

I agree Mars could have been an outpost for visiting ET. What would have been a more ideal location at the time 4 billion years ago, Mars or Earth? How enjoyable would our solar system be during that time anyway? It was still in formation and being bombarded with constant asteroids.







 
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