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Do they make kitty Xanax?

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posted on Jun, 17 2015 @ 10:37 PM
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My 2 yr old cat is driving me insane. She wanders around the house meowing incessantly, day and night. She also has bad separation anxiety if she sees me go behind a closed door. If I go outside, she will run between all the doors and windows meowing like crazy trying to get wherever I'm at. She does the same thing if I go into the garage. Sometimes I let her sleep in my room at night. But lately she won't shut up, so I kick her out. If I put her out, she stands at the door squalling her head off and digging at the door.

She has been acting like this for the past several months. She has been fixed since she was 6 weeks old, so I know she isn't in heat. She is healthy so I don't think it's a health issue. She is not an only-kitty so I don't think she's lonely.

My husband is ready to throw her in the lake. (No worries...I'd never let him do that!) But I am at my wits end...




posted on Jun, 17 2015 @ 10:44 PM
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It would be the human kind dialed to the cats weight. But consult your cat shrink before anything. She could be full blown psychotic.



posted on Jun, 17 2015 @ 10:47 PM
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originally posted by: Sillyosaurus
It would be the human kind dialed to the cats weight. But consult your cat shrink before anything. She could be full blown psychotic.


Your probably right...the two men in her life consistently drive her crazy! Our house is a feline version of 'As the World Turns.'



posted on Jun, 17 2015 @ 10:51 PM
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a reply to: CIAGypsy

Don't think they would actually give her xanax but call your vet and I am sure they have something for it.



posted on Jun, 17 2015 @ 11:04 PM
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First things first...take her to your vet! Explain to the doctor just what you have here so as to eliminate any health issues. The vet will suggest a course of treatment depending upon what he/she finds. It definitely sounds like something's going on. But for your kitty's sake, as well as your own, seek a professional 's advice. A good many human meds can be used on our four footed, furry family members...but should NEVER BE USED IN AN EXPERIMENTAL MANNER! Personally I have seen way too many horrific results from well meaning people "trying" something out without knowing what they're doing. Good luck to both of you!



posted on Jun, 17 2015 @ 11:06 PM
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Also be ready to pay out of pocket for what ever meds they tell ya.

So generic generic generic!

It's all the same.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 12:40 AM
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Anyone else find it sickly ironic that we treat our children the same way we treat our pets?

"Pain in the ass? Let's dope 'em up real good and happy-like."

Just because it's a cat doesn't make it any more acceptable. If you can't take care of the cat, re-home her with someone who can. Don't make her spend the rest of her life (or however long it is until "someone" throws her in the lake) barely aware of what's going on around her.

That's cruel. Especially to do that to a hunter by nature.

Cats have notoriously sensitive kidneys, by the way. You shouldn't be giving her any drugs at all unless you absolutely have to.

And being annoyed doesn't qualify as a necessity.


edit on 6/18/15 by NthOther because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 01:22 AM
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Hi CIA.

I have a couple of questions to ask you before giving you some advice as a professional with over 25 years experience in veterinary animal behaviour :

You say sometimes you let her sleep in your bedroom. How much is sometimes?

What do you feed her, canned meat, dry catfood, leftovers?

Do you let her jump on the tables and kitchen bar and does she steal food?

Is anyone ill or nervous in your household?

Is anyone pregnant or undergoing menopause in the household?

You say that she was sterilized at 6 weeks old???? A little young methinks as normally a female cat should normally be spayed between 5 to 7 months old!

Does the cat push her tail to one side when you stroke her back at the moment?

Just a couple of questions that may eliminate certain issues.

Kindest respects

Nibs

a reply to: CIAGypsy


edit on 18-6-2015 by Nibbles because: Crap spelling



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 01:34 AM
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a reply to: CIAGypsy

Pets mirror their human counterparts.

Maybe let her wander around outside while you're home. She might not feel as dependent on you after that.

Best of luck to you though



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 02:06 AM
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[url]http://www.petco.com/product/7743/Richards-Organics-Pet-Calm.aspx?CoreCat=certona-_-ProductDetail_1-_-Richard%27s%20Organics%20Pet%20Calm-7743[/u rl]
Yes they do, the stuff above works well. It is the same stuff mentioned below. I was driving myself nuts trying to remember the name of rescue remedy.
edit on 6/18/2015 by calstorm because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 02:27 AM
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They do have pet Prozac, but I would try rescue remedy first and listen to poster Nibbles, that person sounds onto it. Good luck with your pudding tat.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 06:47 AM
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There is a cat pheremone called Feliway that comes in a spray or diffuser that may help. It triggers happy and relaxed moods for a cat.

I have a cat who can be a bit clingy and whiny. He had a period where he was VERY clingy and whiny. In his case I think boredom had a lot to do with his behavior. Some things that helped were ...

A window seat with a birdfeeder right outside the window . He spends many happy hours here watching the birds come and feed. He's learned to sit quietly so he doesn't scare them away.

A source of fresh running water. He turns up his nose at water in a bowl if it's been sitting for a while. At first this was a fountain, but the fountain got noisy and he stopped using it. Lately he likes sipping from the filter of my one gallon beta tank. Obviously not ideal, but fishy gets his water changed frequently, and it makes kitty happy, so I let him. Or I may leave a faucet in the bathroom on a slow drip for him.

Cuddles. Sometimes when he's whiny he just wants me to stop what I'm doing, and hug him for a while. 10 min of cuddles and he's happier.

A clear spot on my desk for him to sit. He wants to stay near me at my level while I work, so he's got a spot on my desk that's just his.

Outside time. If kitty is indoors 24/7 and bored, people playtime might not be enough for him. My guy has a collar with a tag and bell. The bell is more so I can find him easily than to warn potential prey. I let him out into the yard when I'm able to watch over him. You can also try a harness with a light lead. Some cats are happy indoors, some really need to get outside for awhile.

A special treat once a day, at the same time each day. Could be tinned food, tuna, chicken, etc, just something extra nummy. It gives him a reason to ask for something specific at a specific time, and he'll hold off some of his whining until it's time for his treat.

Talk to him when he gets whiny. Have a happy conversation. You may be able to get him to tone down the whiny a bit and have conversational meows with you just by changing how you react to him.

edit on 18-6-2015 by eeyipes because: (no reason given)

edit on 18-6-2015 by eeyipes because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 09:42 AM
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a reply to: CIAGypsy

I'm quite positive there is something just like that for cats. One of my dogs is on "Reconcile" for his separation anxiety. It works but it's a constant battle as there are good days and bad days. (On a bad day I'll come home to a missing wall.)

Your vet should be able to recommend an appropriate chemical for your kitty. But also realize that the drugs don't work overnight, it takes 2-4 weeks for the levels to reach a clinical level in the bloodstream.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 11:16 AM
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Your kitty may be extremely bored, so I would suggest you go out and buy some stimulating toys.

www.petplace.com...




edit on 18-6-2015 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)

edit on 18-6-2015 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)

edit on 18-6-2015 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 11:23 AM
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Alprazolam(generic xanax) is actually used for pets. I personally have had it perscribed for my chocolate lab because of her traumatic upbringing she inherently developed a very strong sense of anxiety, which at times really effected her behavior negatively.

I know that they do prescribe it to cats as well....

Using Alprazolam, Generic Xanax For Pets (Dogs & Cats)





indications for Alprazolam

Anxiety can be a crippling condition, and one that affects more than just people. Our pets are just as susceptible to life’s stressors, and in many cases, pharmaceutical treatment is necessary. Drugs like alprazolam can help. A benzodiazepine, alprazolam enhances the effects of natural chemicals in the brain, resulting in a calming like effect. Alprazolam is useful in cases where your pet is otherwise unable to control their anxiety, helping them reclaim their life.

Precautions

Due to the effects this drug has on the brain, along with our limitations in understanding how the brain actually works, certain vets advise against giving this drug to pets exhibiting signs of aggression, warning that the effect of alprazolam is just strong enough to rid these pets of the very anxiety that is holding back their aggressive outbursts. Alprazolam should be given cautiously to pets with liver or kidney disease, glaucoma, pregnant, are elderly, or in a debilitated condition. Taking alprazolam with antacids might slow the rate of absorption, and the two medications should be separated by at least two hours if being taken concurrently. Drugs like cimetidine, erythromycin, itraconazole, ketoconazole, propranolol, or valproic acid might decrease the metabolism of alprazolam, and cause an increase in sedition. Flumazenil might reverse the effects of alprazolam, making it useful in the event of an overdose.

The effects of digoxin might be increased if taking with alprazolam, and should be monitored. In general, taking alprazolam with barbiturates or other CNS depressants might increase the sedative effects. Hepatic enzyme inhibitors might alter the metabolism of other cytochrome P-450 metabolized drugs.

Dosage

Dogs - 0.01 - 0.1 mg/kg orally, taken as needed (NEVER more than 4 mg a day)

Cats - 0.125 - 0.25 mg/kg orally, taken every 12 hours

It is important to note that this is an ‘extra-label’ drug in pets, in that it has not been approved by the FDA for use in pets. However it can be prescribed legally by a vet as there is no veterinary alternative to this medication. For the best effects, behavior modification therapy should be done in conjunction with the treatment.

Side Effects

The most common side effect of alprazolam is sedation, along with the inability of your pet to benefit from the behavior modification. In some rare cases, and mostly in dogs, the sedative effects of the drug may actually become reversed, having an energizing effect of the dog. In cats, however, the side effects tend to be an increase in affection, strange behavior, irritability, and possibly even an increase in depression. If you think your pet might be experiencing any of these side effects, contact your vet immediately.

edit on 18-6-2015 by CallmeRaskolnikov because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 11:44 AM
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originally posted by: InTheLight
Your kitty may be extremely bored, so I would suggest you go out and buy some stimulating toys.

www.petplace.com...





Haha! That looks like it's going to be a fun movie!

I agree. It just may be that Kitty just needs some exercise and a little extra cuddles and pets.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: windword

I agree that movie looks like fun.

I also agree that drugs should be the absolute last resort if other behavior changing methods fail.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 01:39 PM
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Answers below....


originally posted by: Nibbles
Hi CIA.

I have a couple of questions to ask you before giving you some advice as a professional with over 25 years experience in veterinary animal behaviour :

You say sometimes you let her sleep in your bedroom. How much is sometimes?

~~~She sleeps in my room maybe 1-2 times a week. When she does sleep with me, she sleeps right next to my head. For the most part, she seems to meow less when I let her come & go as she pleases. However, sometimes she will decide to play or fight with the other cats (both fixed males) and makes such a ruckus that it wakes everyone up. So my husband insists on keeping her out of the bedroom most of the time. Before the last month or so, she might meow at the door occasionally. Now she is meowing at the door all the time.

What do you feed her, canned meat, dry catfood, leftovers?

~~~She gets dry catfood only that is available at all times. No canned. No people food.

Do you let her jump on the tables and kitchen bar and does she steal food?

~~~Not allowed on the tables or counters. She does sneak onto them when we aren't around, but nothing is left out so she isn't eating off of them. When she gets caught, she jumps down immediately.

Is anyone ill or nervous in your household?

~~~No one is nervous or ill. She does tend to be a nervous/skittish cat, even when the other two aren't.

Is anyone pregnant or undergoing menopause in the household?

~~~Dear Lord, I hope not....

You say that she was sterilized at 6 weeks old???? A little young methinks as normally a female cat should normally be spayed between 5 to 7 months old!

~~~I had no choice in this. I rescued her from a shelter at 5 weeks old. They refuse to let any animal leave without being spayed/neutered. She was spayed before I got her.

Does the cat push her tail to one side when you stroke her back at the moment?

~~~Not that I've noticed, but I will check for sure tonight.

Just a couple of questions that may eliminate certain issues.

Kindest respects

Nibs

a reply to: CIAGypsy



Thank you very much for your input.... I appreciate it.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 01:44 PM
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originally posted by: rockintitz
a reply to: CIAGypsy

Pets mirror their human counterparts.

Maybe let her wander around outside while you're home. She might not feel as dependent on you after that.

Best of luck to you though


We do have an outdoor "cat enclosure" that I allow them into if the weather is good. Also, if I have time, I will let them outside in the backyard (not in the cathouse) but only if they are being observed at all times and usually no longer than a half hour.

She loves to be outside, but the minute I open the door and go to corral them she is usually running inside without any prompting from me.

And before anyone asks....they have not been in contact with any strays or other animals. I am 1000% positive on this.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 01:50 PM
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Thank you to everyone who responded. I appreciate hearing everyone's opinions... I will definitely set up an appointment with the vet just to rule out any health issues and see what they have to say. If there is a non-drug method to help her, I would obviously prefer it over medications...but it is clear that she is trying to tell us something. I treat my pets as if they are family members. At the same time, sleep deprivation isn't healthy for us humans either. The situation is coming to a head and that's why I'm reaching out....for advice.


I appreciate you all for sharing yours!



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