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Ramadan Begins!

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posted on Jun, 17 2015 @ 09:12 PM
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Salaams everyone. Our month of fasting & reflection begins tonight! Well, the fasting begins in the morning but you get the point.

Anyway, just wishing peace & love to all of ATS, regardless of our differences. I may not post as much this month (hey, stop cheering!). But if you ask nicely, I may answer Ramadan specific questions here. But don't get mad if I don't respond right away.

Ramadan Mubarak to all!




posted on Jun, 17 2015 @ 09:27 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

EE, actually I do have a question. I am an embarrassingly ignorant Christian in the greetings, niceties involving wishing my Muslam neighbors a well, "happy Ramadan" but feel to stupid to ask them. Could you please give me a few Salutations I can give out?



posted on Jun, 17 2015 @ 10:19 PM
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a reply to: Spader

I feel the same, I want to wish them a happy Ramadan but I don't know enough about it and I might sound ridiculous saying it so I just say nothing...



posted on Jun, 17 2015 @ 11:52 PM
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a reply to: Spader "Ramadan Mubarak!" It means have a blessed Ramadan.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 12:49 AM
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Have a blessed Ramadan!



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 02:29 AM
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Salamat Ramadan. That's the Indonesian version.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 02:38 AM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

Ramadan Mubarak dear brother !!!!!!!!


And to ALL peace and blessings !!!!!!



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 04:25 AM
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originally posted by: Look2theSacredHeart
a reply to: Spader "Ramadan Mubarak!" It means have a blessed Ramadan.

Thanks so much, and Ramadan Mubarek!



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 04:41 AM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

Happy Ramadan to you, Ramadan Mubarak. Good to know the proper salutation.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 07:03 AM
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a reply to: Spader

I believe it actually depends on where you're (or they're) from.
In arab countries, saying "Ramadan Mubarak" sometimes just got me confused looks. I guess more common there is "Ramadan Kareem". (What sounds like) "Ramadan Mubarak" is used at least in South Asia (at least Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, etc.) and Eastern Europe. As Cloudbuster said, the indonesian version is "Salamat Ramadan".

Simplest, of course, is (if you're both english speakers) "Happy Ramadan!"

Speaking of which, Happy Ramadan!



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 07:45 AM
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That's the thing - Some holidays are "happies" but others are times of reflection and more somber. Which is Ramadan? A time of happiness and joy or a time of somber reflection.

In order to convey the best Anglicized wishes, we need to know. Should we say "blessed" or "happy?" I'd feel awkward saying Happy Ramadan to a group of somberly fasting and reflecting people just like I don't tend to say Happy Memorial Day to a group of people laying flowers in a cemetery.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 08:19 AM
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edit on 18-6-2015 by babloyi because: DOUBLE-POST, SORRY!



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 08:19 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko
Hahahah...I guess it could be joyous as well as sombre reflection. In any case, Ramadan is not a SAD occasion, any of those could work.
That's the thing about cultural appropriation of religious holidays, even (or perhaps especially) Islamic ones. Outsiders end up thinking that that "tradition" is part of the overall religion, when in fact it is just how it is dealt with in that country/region.
For example, in many arab countries, Ramadan is spent not eating/drinking all day, and then partying all night, for an entire month, and then likely sleeping through most of the Eid Day (and optional morning prayers) that follows.
In contrast, in Pakistan, for example, it is spent not eating/drinking all day, and then still being all "serious" at night, studying religion etc., with no "fun" stuff, eg. cinema outings at night, and so on, and then on Eid Day the entire neighbourhood shows up at the local mosque for the optional morning prayers (usually even more people than for the obligatory Friday congregational prayers).



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 09:25 AM
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Happy ramadan everyone !!


Have the best times of your life and may your prayers be answered .



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 11:19 AM
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Ramadan Mubarak to all.



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 11:24 AM
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Ramadan Mubarak to all who observe it.

Gotta say Ramadan breakfast on the rooftop at sunset when I was in Cairo was the BEST dang meal I had in 10 years!

Nom om om .
edit on 18-6-2015 by zazzafrazz because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2015 @ 12:39 PM
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a reply to: babloyi

You are right of course. How incredibly naive of me to assume all Muslams speak the same language. Sometimes I astound myself at how stupid I am sometimes. Thanks to all and a Happy Ramadan to all of my Muslim friends no matter their country of origin.



posted on Jun, 19 2015 @ 12:01 AM
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originally posted by: Spader
a reply to: enlightenedservant

EE, actually I do have a question. I am an embarrassingly ignorant Christian in the greetings, niceties involving wishing my Muslam neighbors a well, "happy Ramadan" but feel to stupid to ask them. Could you please give me a few Salutations I can give out?


Sorry for the delay
Just logged on for the first time since starting this thread.

Ok, "Ramadan Mubarak" is the greeting during the month of Ramadan. "Ramadan Kareem" is the way you answer it.

During the Eid, which happens at the end of the month of Ramadan, we say "Eid Mubarak" and respond with "Eid Kareem".

Hope that helps. And thanks for the response.



posted on Jun, 19 2015 @ 12:04 AM
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a reply to: MrMaybeNot

No way! You can always greet us. Virtually no Muslim is going to reject you if you greet us or say something nice for Ramadan. You can even say "Happy Ramadan" if you prefer.

Though I half-jokingly warn you; during the last few hours of sunlight, some of us may be grumpy lol. Especially from fasting in this heat. Fasting is relatively easy the first few days, then it becomes a battle that can test anyone's patience.



posted on Jun, 19 2015 @ 12:05 AM
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originally posted by: Kapusta
a reply to: enlightenedservant

Ramadan Mubarak dear brother !!!!!!!!


And to ALL peace and blessings !!!!!!


Ramadan Kareem & the same for you brother. I wish you a happy, productive, and blessed month.

edit on 19-6-2015 by enlightenedservant because: added more





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