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Magna Carta. Modern Democracy Is 800 Years Old Today.

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posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 08:37 AM
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With the signing of The Magna Carta by King John of England on 15th June 1215, today marks the date of when Modern Democracy was born.

Celebrations have been taking place at Runnymede , the location of the signing of The Magna Carta. Dignitaries from around the globe have been in attendance for this important occasion.

www.bbc.co.uk...




posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 08:47 AM
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Democracy, the day some people decided it would be better for them to get people to vote for leaders (themselves). It's been a bad run for democracy so far, I wouldn't necessarily praise it.



posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 08:50 AM
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a reply to: Vector99




It's been a bad run for democracy so far, I wouldn't necessarily praise it.


However it is still far better than what came before Magna Carta.



posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 08:51 AM
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a reply to: alldaylong

This is a good read on the subject .

In a direct democracy, the people themselves will be able to set tax rates and to decide upon all aspects of fiscal policy.
Until the UK chooses to reform to direct democracy and, if you are unhappy about your tax being spent on any specific policy you can either protest, or take direct action. If direct action, Article 61 of the Magna Carta states how and why tax payers have the legal right [since 1215] to with-hold tax payments from the Treasury and because the Magna Carta was not created by Parliament, no government can lawfully repeal any of the articles within it without public consent.
In 1297 Parliament passed the Parliament Act which in-short, was an edited version of the 1215 Magna Carta. Article 61 and anything that related to lawful rebellion was removed and establishment propagandists have since attempted to make it function as a replacement for the Magna Carta. However, according to UK contract law, when new acts or charters conflict with existing ones and their existing articles, these new acts and charters then become unlawful.
To summarise; if an agreement, contract or charter states that clauses and articles can only be repealed or modified with the mutual consent of all parties, then according to UK law, no additional separate agreements, contracts or charters can replace the original agreement. Laws, acts and charters do not become obsolete without repeal and as none of the articles within the 1215 Magna Carta have ever been modified or repealed by any of the involved parties, the Parliament Act of 1297 becomes unlawful.
No UK government has ever had to answer to its violation of this aspect of contract law and as such, we hope that a movement to push for this could come through your refusal to fund unjust policies.
The lawful way to with-hold tax payments via Article 61 of the Magna Carta are as follows:
www.paparty.co.uk...

edit on 15-6-2015 by the2ofusr1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 08:52 AM
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a reply to: alldaylong

Its a grand thing, and so a certain amount of celebration is in order. However, I would argue that some somber reflection is also in order.

I say so because I question whether the people who wrote that document, the people who signed it, would have imagined that all this time later, the people are still in thrall to a power elite, and have been disarmed and rendered incapable of forcing change when the government oppose the will of the people.

I believe they would be quite disappointed by it all, personally speaking.



posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 08:55 AM
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I have always wanted to see an original copy of the Magna Carta. Wasn't a copy of it found recently in some person's attic? It is sad that 800 years later we still have not perfected the ideals set forth in this document. However, things can always be worse, much much worse.
edit on 1amMon, 15 Jun 2015 08:57:04 -0500p57869 by warpig69 because: wrong date



posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 09:02 AM
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a reply to: alldaylong

I think we should put it to a vote on facebark, twatter, instagrim and linkedup to celebrate the occasion by hanging and/or beheading 800 of the most tyrannical banksters, politicians, lawyers and usurping bloodlines in existence today so we can zero the meter and start again.

Since it's in recognition of 800 years of mob rule and all - innit.



posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 09:11 AM
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If it weren't for a few there would be little, only because of stifling education.



posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 09:16 AM
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Magna Carta yes.
Modern democracy, no.
The most accurate summary is to be found, as usual, in Sellars and Yeatman.


Magna Charter
THERE also happened in this reign the memorable Charta, known as Magna Charter on account of the Latin Magna (great) and Charter (a Charter); this was the first of the famous Chartas and Gartas of the Realm and was invented by the Barons on a desert island in the Thames called Ganymede. By congregating there, armed to the teeth, the Barons compelled John to sign the Magna Charter, which said:
1. That no one was to be put to death, save for some reason (except the Common People).
2. That everyone should be free (except the Common People).
3. That everything should be of the same weight and measure throughout the Realm (except the Common People).
4. That the Courts should be stationary, instead of following a very tiresome medieval official known as the King's Person all over the country.
5. That `no person should be fined to his utter ruin' (except the King's Person).
6. That the Barons should not be tried except by a special jury of other Barons who would understand.
Magna Charter was therefore the chief cause of Democracy in England, and thus a Good Thing for everyone (except the Common People

"1066 And All That"; King John



posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 09:19 AM
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We Americans would do well to pay our respects to the Magna Charta, much of our concept of basic rights was founded upon it.

Sad thing is I'm not sure if we should celebrate it's signing or be mourning it's passing.
edit on 15-6-2015 by Asktheanimals because: (no reason given)

edit on 15-6-2015 by Asktheanimals because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 09:22 AM
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Some see it as a grand thing, some see it as someone telling someone else what to do just because, meh, to each their own.



posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 09:23 AM
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"Does Magna Carta mean nothing to you?" The lad himself;




edit on 15-6-2015 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 09:48 AM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

Tony Hancock.

The great man himself. Born in the next road to where i lived some years ago in Birmingham.



posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 10:17 AM
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a reply to: the2ofusr1
A poor grasp of the law, methinks.

To the OP. The Magna Carta is a critical document that started England down a long, and often lonely path. Little things like habeas corpus, civil liberties and the ability for the incumbent monarch to be "controlled", are all important in those societies that are now liberal democracies.

Quote from the Magna Carta...


To no one will We sell, to none will We deny or delay, right or justice


British Library



posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: alldaylong
An important historical document but saying it was the birth of modern democracy is overselling it a lot.



posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 11:45 AM
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That document was written by nobles, for nobles, nothing to do with the 'common man' even to-day, the 'common man' can be shot if he disturbs the kings dear while it/they are feeding.



posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 11:56 AM
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a reply to: pikestaff

Exactly, it is really hard to celebrate a document that ensured slavery, There will always be an overlord making sure you are ok. I guess people are ok with that if they are comfortable?



posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 12:03 PM
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originally posted by: alldaylong
a reply to: Vector99




However it is still far better than what came before Magna Carta.



No it really isnt, if you are referingto to a productive catholic dogma which makes the less fortunate have it slightly better off with the purposefull meaning of working 45/h week and still debt themselves.

Democracy is like a days of our lives show





posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 12:25 PM
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originally posted by: alldaylong
a reply to: Vector99




It's been a bad run for democracy so far, I wouldn't necessarily praise it.


However it is still far better than what came before Magna Carta.




What exactly came before it?



posted on Jun, 15 2015 @ 12:39 PM
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a reply to: Vector99




What exactly came before it?



A brief answer.

Nothing.







 
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