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Who is Teaching Who?

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posted on Jun, 13 2015 @ 12:58 PM
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There is always something special about the grandparent-grandchild relationship. Beyond barriers of jealousies, race, creed, religion, income, time...sometimes it just doesn't matter.

As we get older we tend to let go of the little things that we thought were so important; so all encompassing and lean towards quiet moments of reflection, of patience, understanding and most of all, tolerance.

As the young and yet-to-be-tarnished can teach us, all of that which we will soon be so caught with in our daily lives has yet to surface as it's not yet even a remote possible reality.

So what better way to nurture each other but through spending the day together? Have a look at the vid, visit the site and it will become more than I can express.




The Intergenerational Learning Center (ILC) is an award-winning child care program located within Providence Mount St. Vincent in West Seattle. All children are welcome. Both planned and spontaneous activities and programs for children take place throughout the building and campus which is also home to more than 400 older adults.

Five days a week, the children and residents come together in a variety of planned activities such as music, dancing, art, lunch, storytelling or just visiting. These activities result in mutual benefits for both generations.This enhances the opportunities for children and people of all ages to have frequent interaction and is an integral part of the Mount's intergenerational community.


The ILC offers children opportunities:

To learn about the normal aging process;
To accept people with disabilities;
To be involved with people who are two or three generations apart;
To become part of an extended family;
To help them reduce their fear of older adults; and
To receive and give unconditional and unbounded love and attention.

In addition, residents and program participants benefit from:

Frequent interaction with children throughout their day;
Physical activity in playing with the children;
Opportunities to play, laugh and enjoy the spirit and joy that children bring to their home environment;
A renewed sense of self-worth;
An opportunity to transfer knowledge; and
The ability to serve as role models.

washington.providence.org...


Kinda makes a lot of other issues seem small right now.

Just for a laugh...

And the result may be something like this:



Jude




edit on 13-6-2015 by jude11 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 13 2015 @ 01:24 PM
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As we get older we tend to let go of the little things that we thought were so important and all encompassing and lean towards a quiet moment of reflection, of patience, understanding and most of all, tolerance.

Young people are concerned with establishing social status, finding a mate, and making your own territory. This is primate behavior and it often includes violence. Now for the big shocker, the people who get older are the ones who have already dealt with these primate drives. This means they're secure with their social status, have established territories, and live with long term-mates. Good for them, but telling a young person like me to have more patience, understand, and tolerance, doesn't help me now does it?



posted on Jun, 13 2015 @ 01:29 PM
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a reply to: jude11

My grandmother is badass.

She is in her eighties and goes dancing when she can, she knows how to email and will send me the occasional dirty joke. Her body might be fragile but her mind is sharp as a tack.



posted on Jun, 13 2015 @ 01:37 PM
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originally posted by: PrinceJohnson

Good for them, but telling a young person like me to have more patience, understand, and tolerance, doesn't help me now does it?


I'm confused...are you saying that you're a 3 yr old?


No one is telling you anything that you probably don't or should already know. But the time spent with the elderly is going to be invaluable to many of these toddlers I'm betting. Just through close company, observation...these kids will absorb certain life lessons without even realizing it.

The biggest lesson I believe will be the acceptance of the older generation instead of the "Get outta my way old lady" mentality we see very often today.



Jude



posted on Jun, 13 2015 @ 04:48 PM
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a reply to: PrinceJohnson




Good for them, but telling a young person like me to have more patience, understand, and tolerance, doesn't help me now does it?


A mature person should already have those traits, being young is no excuse. If younger people would get rid of the "Me First" reaction to almost every thing they do, maybe the older person's point of view would make more sense. It's not so much about slowing down, it's about applying the lessons you've learned in life to all your problems and using that experience for your own benefit.



posted on Jun, 13 2015 @ 06:39 PM
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originally posted by: DAVID64
a reply to: PrinceJohnson




Good for them, but telling a young person like me to have more patience, understand, and tolerance, doesn't help me now does it?


A mature person should already have those traits, being young is no excuse. If younger people would get rid of the "Me First" reaction to almost every thing they do, maybe the older person's point of view would make more sense. It's not so much about slowing down, it's about applying the lessons you've learned in life to all your problems and using that experience for your own benefit.


I wish I could star ya a hunnerd times my friend. You get it.


Peace




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