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Your Brain Is Wired Like That of Birds, Study Finds

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posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 02:47 PM
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In an attempt to better understand cognition and its implications in robotics, a team at the Imperial College London mapped the human brain and compared it to those of some other animal. And they discovered that although birds and humans have much (obviously) differences, our brain's pathways are surpringly similar to that of birds'.

ICL source

The team reached this conclusion after having analyzed hub nodes within both brains, the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex.

According to the ICL,


The long-term goal of the team is to use the information generated from the wiring diagram to build computer models that mimic the way that animal brains function, which would be used to control a robot.


edit on 12-6-2015 by swanne because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 03:00 PM
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a reply to: swanne

Okay, I'll say it... most people have bird brains.



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 03:01 PM
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I read an article about this a while back. Wired like a bird but it is physically more like a pig brain.

So we are pig headed bird brains.



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 03:02 PM
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a reply to: swanne

I would at least hope that the comparison was to an eagle or owl, or one of the birds of prey.

If it's akin to something like a turkey or chicken, it would make so much more sense.

Never even crossed my mind to think of parrots... though I haven't read the article yet.

Pigeons? Wow...



edit on 6/12/2015 by EternalSolace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 03:04 PM
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Suddenly the mystery behind the intelligence of corvids and parrot gets alot more clear.





posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 03:07 PM
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originally posted by: EternalSolace

I would at least hope that the comparison was to an eagle or owl, or one of the birds of prey.


Are pigeons okay for you?



The team developed their map by analysing 34 studies of the anatomy of the pigeon brain

www3.imperial.ac.uk...



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 03:12 PM
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posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 03:21 PM
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a reply to: swanne

Also you know the ancient egyptian symbology of like 'bird headed god'.

I think its related to the ability of humans to observe things objectively; i.e. birds eye view. To look down upon the world as if you were above and separate.



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 03:38 PM
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originally posted by: ImaFungi
a reply to: swanne

Also you know the ancient egyptian symbology of like 'bird headed god'.

I think its related to the ability of humans to observe things objectively; i.e. birds eye view. To look down upon the world as if you were above and separate.


That works best when you are on your own...as in separate. A bunch of Cumans together usually talk and argue shiite and agree on nothing objective!

No I'm not a loner, I love talking shiite, so here we go again, what came first? the.................



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 03:39 PM
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a reply to: swanne

Luckily for us we share some genes with birds:


Birds Survived Meteor Strike 66M Years Ago To Evolve Human Speech
Most of life was wiped out 66 million years ago after a meteor strike and only a few species of birds survived life on Earth. Researchers led by Dr. Erich Jarvis at Duke University studied the brains of birds species all the way back to that event. This study investigated the brains of many species of animals for gene expression related to language and vocalization in humans, songbirds, parrots, hummingbirds, macaque monkeys, doves, and quail. A surprising result? Neuroimaging shows there is a molecular similarity between birds and humans in the areas of birdsong and human speech. This is was only demonstrated in vocal-learning birds such as the zebra finch and was not observed in vocal non-learners such as quails and doves. In short: birds and humans use about the same 50 genes to speak and that ability evolved independently in different bird species many times. Another surprising result? The human motor area LMC was more similar to an important area (RA) in songbirds than to the motor cortex of a macaque monkey. As reported by Seana Coulson of the Kavli Institute for Brain and Mind at UCSD: “In spite of hundreds of millions of years of divergent evolution, birds and humans share similar brain circuits for vocal learning marked by similar expression of about 50 genes. Researchers studying the neurobiology of language have long been held back by the lack of animal models. The Duke research raises the possibility of using songbirds as a molecular model for studying speech production. In this way we may come to understand how the uniquely human trait of language is a new machine made out of old parts.”


From: www.rawscience.tv...

edit on 12-6-2015 by Agartha because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 03:49 PM
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originally posted by: wasaka
a reply to: swanne

Okay, I'll say it... most people have bird brains.


I've also heard the saying we don't have the brains God gave geese .



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 03:53 PM
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originally posted by: Agartha
a reply to: swanne

Luckily for us we share some genes with birds:


Birds Survived Meteor Strike 66M Years Ago To Evolve Human Speech
Most of life was wiped out 66 million years ago after a meteor strike and only a few species of birds survived life on Earth. Researchers led by Dr. Erich Jarvis at Duke University studied the brains of birds species all the way back to that event. This study investigated the brains of many species of animals for gene expression related to language and vocalization in humans, songbirds, parrots, hummingbirds, macaque monkeys, doves, and quail. A surprising result? Neuroimaging shows there is a molecular similarity between birds and humans in the areas of birdsong and human speech. This is was only demonstrated in vocal-learning birds such as the zebra finch and was not observed in vocal non-learners such as quails and doves. In short: birds and humans use about the same 50 genes to speak and that ability evolved independently in different bird species many times. Another surprising result? The human motor area LMC was more similar to an important area (RA) in songbirds than to the motor cortex of a macaque monkey. As reported by Seana Coulson of the Kavli Institute for Brain and Mind at UCSD: “In spite of hundreds of millions of years of divergent evolution, birds and humans share similar brain circuits for vocal learning marked by similar expression of about 50 genes. Researchers studying the neurobiology of language have long been held back by the lack of animal models. The Duke research raises the possibility of using songbirds as a molecular model for studying speech production. In this way we may come to understand how the uniquely human trait of language is a new machine made out of old parts.”


From: www.rawscience.tv...


That is really interesting to hear about, two good links now from the OP and yourself, and much to think about.


In Edit, BTW I didn't remove any of the text that was in of all your post in reply?? someone is pissing about.
edit on 12-6-2015 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 04:03 PM
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originally posted by: smurfy

In Edit, BTW I didn't remove any of the text that was in of all your post in reply?? someone is pissing about.


ATS doesn't support multiple nestled quotes anymore. So anything nestled inside a quote disappears upon posting.



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 04:08 PM
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a reply to: swanne

Now I see why we all like to # on each other...

Thanks I'm here all week...



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 04:13 PM
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originally posted by: swanne

originally posted by: smurfy

In Edit, BTW I didn't remove any of the text that was in of all your post in reply?? someone is pissing about.


ATS doesn't support multiple nestled quotes anymore. So anything nestled inside a quote disappears upon posting.

Aha! The thing is I would usually take out some content and leave what should be relevant, I simply forgot this time, so that's the end of that...great

I'm already having trouble with non-caps text disappearing when linking back, and I'm near sure that is something to do with the layering..but thanks for the heads-up.



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 04:32 PM
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a reply to: swanne

I just knew it! That scientific finding totally supports my long held belief--considering that I have not feather one--that I could fly if I could just get my mind into the right gear.

I reason that if we have the same wiring as birds that evidently we could fly at an earlier time--maybe about the time that birds quit walking and started flying?

I'll be trying to reprogram my lost abilities if not stunt flying techniques in my lucid dreaming tonight. That will be simple flight simulation of course, with self-training, I'm confident I can get out in the open air of reality pronto.



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 05:00 PM
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a reply to: smurfy

the # or the ass



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 05:34 PM
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Damn right! Mines wired like a ROOSTERS!



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 05:40 PM
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So we are ancestors of dinosaurs? If birds evolved from dinosaurs than wouldn't that make us part Trex too?


Wonder if the saying still is untrue: Sticking feathers up your butt does not make you a chicken.
edit on 12-6-2015 by Tranceopticalinclined because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 08:46 PM
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originally posted by: swanne
Suddenly the mystery behind the intelligence of corvids and parrot gets alot more clear.






I've longed believed that corvids, dolphins, pigs, and octopus are the "humans" of their respective fields. If either of them had hands like us, they'd be incredible (or dangerous).







 
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