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A Legacy Set In Stone, UK Nuclear

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posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 09:53 AM
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There's a chance to have your say on the future of low level radioactive waste disposal in West Cumbria www.cumbriacrack.com...

This is the place. llwrsite.com...

It's a massive dump of older waste tipped into trenches and newer waste set in grout in steel containers. The size of the dump will stagger you if you look at it on google maps. It's at a place called Drigg.

It leaks and will always leak. www.theguardian.com...


Meanwhile the underground dump for the even more lethal waste has got off to a flying start.


A geological disposal facility will only be built if we can find a safe site that has suitable geology and a community that is willing to host it.
www.nda.gov.uk...

Nowhere has suitable geology and no community will ever be willing to host it.

The sheer quantity of dangerous radioactive waste is mind boggling. It's an issue too often ignored. A schoolteacher here confidently told his class the waste was being safely dealt with. One of his pupils asked him to show Drigg to the class on google maps. The teacher found Drigg and his mood changed. He said, "I can see I'm going to have to learn more about this."



edit on 12 6 2015 by Kester because: spacing




posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 10:44 AM
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a reply to: Kester
The way we store nuclear waste sums up how humans fail to look ahead IMO.

You may be interested in the film "Into Eternity"
www.imdb.com...

Its a documentary about deep nuclear waste storage in Finland,and it is one hell of a thought provoking piece of work.

The very idea of deep waste storage assumes humans will always remember the knowledge of previous generations-a very flawed idea,and potentially very dangerous for the future.




posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 10:51 AM
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Ohhhh would never thought I would have seen that area on ATS.

I myself am from this area, specifically near Sellafield. A nuclear power plant currently being "decommissioned".

My thoughts on Drigg are somewhat biased I would say as I never had a problem living near it, I'm aware of the size of the place they store the waste. My god its big! BUT. Never really had much of a problem with it myself.

They did have radiation detector machines trawling the beaches every few weeks. But again no problem from me.

So now imagine, living 3 miles from the nuclear power plant that had leaks and so on regularly and about 7 miles from Drigg. Fun times!



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 11:11 AM
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Thanks for the info.

The problem with sorting waste there is the rock is mainly limestone based and the mixture of that and nuclear waste produces carbolic acid which leads to leaks.

I'm a big fan of nuclear and think it can be a safe, green and efficient way of producing energy - however storing it there is painfully stupid.



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 12:19 PM
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a reply to: bastion

The painfully stupid bits really do bother me. Abandoning the reprocessing line at a time when the ponds were crammed with intensely radioactive nuclear fuel for example. www.theecologist.org...

The ponds were abandoned after they were overwhelmed with spent fuel in 1974.


A particlar problem arises from the sludge that has accummulated at the bottom of both ponds and skips, which requires especially careful handling. The sludge has to be kept under water in order to prevent its spontaneous ignition.

edit on 12 6 2015 by Kester because: addition



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 12:32 PM
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a reply to: Silcone Synapse



The makers of this documentary are keen to recoup their costs and would appreciate a donation.

People like myself will only see it free on YouTube.

Deep storage isn't going to work. Surface storage isn't going to work.
edit on 12 6 2015 by Kester because: addition



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 01:01 PM
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a reply to: capragenus

The seepage at Drigg is probably moving under the sand out of range of the detectors. There's plenty of time for it to show.

I don't know how you can bear it up there surrounded by all that boring scenery.

edit on 12 6 2015 by Kester because: addition

edit on 12 6 2015 by Kester because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 02:02 PM
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originally posted by: Kester
a reply to: Silcone Synapse
Deep storage isn't going to work. Surface storage isn't going to work.


I agree 100%.

Certain people are making a literal killing by hoodwinking people into believing they can safely store nuclear waste.

What if,perish the thought-we got into a real war situation?
Our enemies could destroy the entire island of the UK without using their own nukes-they could use our nuke waste policy against us to cause a catastrophy with minimal conventional weapons.

We needed to think about this half a century ago,but nOOOO,we are humans,.




posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 02:38 PM
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originally posted by: capragenus
Ohhhh would never thought I would have seen that area on ATS.

I myself am from this area




you me both. and on a clear day heysham is visible across the bay. there is no other place I would rather be. in the middle of 2 reactor establishments. happy days

f



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 05:39 PM
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a reply to: Silcone Synapse

I believe we are in a real war situation.

Imagine one of Magnox's cast iron boxes filled with heavily contaminated rubber gloves. A simple thermite device placed on top would result in a very heavily contaminated store and further contamination outside. Fortunately Magnox have dropped the cast iron boxes in favour of encapsulation in concrete boxes. Many millions cheaper and much less vulnerable to attacks by ten year olds who've watched a couple of 'make your own thermite' YouTube videos.

Millions cheaper and safer.

Is the decommissioning lark just one massive gravy train?
Or has this all been deliberately arranged to put us in a very vulnerable position?
Either way it has to be sorted out to the best of our ability.

Ross Hesketh and others did think about it half a century ago and I'm told he frequently talked about his grave concerns. The expert's warnings were ignored.

It seems impossible to me that this situation has arisen by accident. I'm leaning towards the extreme view that we have been deliberately placed in danger.



posted on Jun, 12 2015 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: Kester

Britain has been close to a nuclear disaster before.
It's just a matter of time before it actually happens.



posted on Jun, 13 2015 @ 05:13 AM
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a reply to: EA006

If it happens as a result of an attack they'll try to pass it off as a random accident like Buncefield.

John Harris of TPUC saw the cruise missile that caused the explosion pass directly over the roof of his house. Other witnesses saw the missile or heard and recognised the sound. Presumably it was payback for the oil war.



posted on Jun, 14 2015 @ 12:03 PM
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a reply to: Kester

Glad to see someone else who "knows" too.

edit on 14-6-2015 by EA006 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 14 2015 @ 12:13 PM
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a reply to: EA006

I'm covering that over here. www.abovetopsecret.com... It's directly relevant to our nuclear waste security.



posted on Jun, 14 2015 @ 12:14 PM
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It's bollocks, there has been public consultation....I attended a meeting in Whitehaven several years ago on the matter.

The majority is opposed to the idea, yet the government are trying to circumvent local authority and give the go ahead.

Kester, I linked you to my thread on the subject the other day, I will post the link again for those that haven't seen it, not trying to hijack your thread, I just feel very strongly on this issue and why it is a very bad idea to put the repository up here.

Cumbria, UK: Nuclear waste dump mineshaft fracking mess!



posted on Jun, 14 2015 @ 12:24 PM
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a reply to: woogleuk

I don't mind if you do hijack my thread to bring your well researched essential information to the readers.

That Greenpeace video of Drigg gives food for thought.

A friend of the late Ross Hesketh was here earlier today talking about Ross's concerns over this little joke. www.bbc.co.uk... The Shaft. Appropriately named.



posted on Jun, 14 2015 @ 12:28 PM
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a reply to: woogleuk

When they say, "A chance to have your say..." they don't actually want to hear the 20 minute expletive ridden monologue that immediately springs to my mind.



posted on Jun, 14 2015 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: Kester

It's to make it look like they are actually concerned about public opinion.

The public said no last time, so the council (Allerdale borough council and Cumbria county council) voted against it.....the result? The government passed a motioned to completely disregard the council / peoples wishes and carried on discussions about using the area.

I wonder how people down south would react if they decided to stick it under there feet, if it's the size of Carlisle then you are talking about 650 square miles. I can't even get my head round having something that size under the area, nevermind it being filled with all that crap.



posted on Jun, 14 2015 @ 12:47 PM
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a reply to: woogleuk

And no one knowing what's actually going to happen once it's down there. We've had Arnie Gundersen warning the Swedish copper cylinders will burst in about 800 years due to gas buildup. Baltic dead. Then there's the alleged cat litter causing drums to blow. www.livescience.com...



posted on Jun, 14 2015 @ 12:52 PM
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a reply to: woogleuk

I concur marra. the decision was/is circumvented so the public consultation will be an exercise in handing out taxpayer tea and biscuits followed by sod off!

f



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