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Bank Bounces This Woman's Check, So She Sends Them An Angry Letter. What She Says Is Perfect.

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posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 06:44 AM
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An 86 years old woman in the states, after being notified that one of her cheques bounced and the bank charges her 30$ for NSF, sends a priceless response to the bank.


Dear Sir,

I am writing to thank you for bouncing my check with which I endeavored to pay my plumber last month. By my calculations, three nanoseconds must have elapsed between his depositing the check and the arrival in my account of the funds needed to honor it. I refer, of course, to the automatic monthly transfer of funds from my modest savings account, an arrangement which, I admit, has been in place for only 31 years. You are to be commended for seizing that brief window of opportunity, and also for debiting my account $30 by way of penalty for the inconvenience caused to your bank.

My thankfulness springs from the manner in which this incident has caused me to rethink my errant financial ways. I noticed that whereas I personally attend to your telephone calls and letters, when I try to contact you, I am confronted by the impersonal, overcharging, pre-recorded, faceless entity which your bank has recently become. From now on, I, like you, choose only to deal with a flesh-and-blood person. My mortgage and loan repayments will therefore and hereafter no longer be automatic, but will arrive at your bank, by check, addressed personally and confidentially to an employee at your bank whom you must nominate. Be aware that it is an offense under the Postal Act for any other person to open such an envelope.


diply.com...




posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 06:55 AM
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a reply to: Telos

I love this woman!

A rant with such class is a dying art.



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 07:05 AM
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a reply to: Telos

Oh my, that's pure gold T, and I thought it ended there, but no, wait theres more..........


Please find attached an Application Contact Status form which I require your chosen employee to complete. I am sorry it runs to eight pages, but in order that I know as much about him or her as your bank knows about me, there is no alternative. Please note that all copies of his or her medical history must be countersigned by a Notary Public, and the mandatory details of his/her financial situation (income, debts, assets and liabilities) must be accompanied by documented proof. In due course, I will issue your employee with a PIN number which he/she must quote in dealings with me. I regret that it cannot be shorter than 28 digits but, again, I have modeled it on the number of button presses required of me to access my account balance on your phone bank service. As they say, imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.

Please allow me to level the playing field even further. When you call me, you will now have a menu of options on my new voice mail system to choose from.

Please press the buttons as follows:

1. To make an appointment to see me.

2. To query a missing payment.

3. To transfer the call to my living room in case I am there.

4. To transfer the call to my bedroom in case I am sleeping.

5. To transfer the call to my toilet in case I am attending to nature.

6. To transfer the call to my mobile phone if I am not at home.

7. To leave a message on my computer, a password to access my computer is required. Password will be communicated to you at a later date to the Authorized Contact.

8. To return to the main menu and to listen to options 1 through 7.

9. To make a general complaint or inquiry. The contact will then be put on hold, pending the attention of my automated answering service. While this may, on occasion, involve a lengthy wait, uplifting music will play for the duration of the call.

Regrettably, but again following your example, I must also levy an establishment fee of $50 to cover the setting up of this new arrangement. Please credit my account after each occasion.

May I wish you a happy, if ever so slightly less prosperous, New Year.

Sincerely,

Your Humble Client


Legendary awesomeness, with a touch of class and a good dose of f### you to the banksters.

There is probably some BS clause hidden deep within some P.O.S bank contract when she first started the account that nullifies her assertions but still, you've got to admire her and I'm glad it's gone viral.

She is my new hero - stick it to them super cool mum, you're the best!!



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 07:30 AM
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a reply to: Telos

This is my favorite "sticking it to a bank" story, EVER.

Man who created own credit card sues bank for not sticking to terms

BTW, there has been an update to that story. The bank was wrong in its proclamation that he'd be in jail for fraud. They ended up settling.

But this letter in the OP is pretty funny too. Too bad nothing will come of it. Though I'm sure the bank will refund that NSF fee.
edit on 9-6-2015 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 07:35 AM
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Addition to the MasterCard commercials going forward:

Sticking it to the bank - Priceless!



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 08:43 AM
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Loving it.

Pay cash.

The bigger the corporations the deeper the labyrinth. Everyone must submit to every step of the bureaucratically complex menu selections, even miss thirty one years a customer.

Enjoy the rat race.



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 09:24 AM
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Banks are the worst...

When the banks charge NSF fees, shouldn't they at least COMPLETE THE DAMN PAYMENT? The bank didn't lose anything from not being able to send the payment, NOTHING AT ALL. They just create a fee "poof" out of nowhere yet they didn't give ANY service in exchange.

It would be like going to the movies, but then the theatre would notice you are missing a nickle...so they keep the money you already payed, you can't see the money and you can't get a refund. This is not fair, it's not justice, it's not even HUMAN.

Any NSF with under 50$ missing should be covered by the banks, hell they make billions of dollars. I wouldn't mind the fee if they actually DID SOMETHING instead of just being CROOKS.



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 09:31 AM
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a reply to: Telos

Utterly brilliant - someone is playing them at their own game. I hope this goes viral and everyone starts doing the same.

Banks forget they have no business without our paying in our money. Personally I would prefer to deal more in cash as I have a fear of my card being gobbled by the hole in the wall contraption thereby making me impotent money wise. I also hate having to use a bank that does not have the courtesy to have enough cashiers for the volume of customers.

In short I hate banks for the lousy service we all have to tolerate today.



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 09:55 AM
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Yea it's cute and all. Good on her.

Banks still run the world, one persons account, will just go to another bank, and take her currency.

Don't mean to piss on the parade here, but ..

Banks control our lives regardless what letters we write.



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: theMediator

Isn't it great that banks can charge you money for not having enough money? There was a stand up comedy bit I remember hearing about that, but I can't for the life of me remember who did it, otherwise I'd post the Youtube vid of it.


It would be like going to the movies, but then the theatre would notice you are missing a nickle...so they keep the money you already payed, you can't see the money and you can't get a refund. This is not fair, it's not justice, it's not even HUMAN.


Wanted to extend your analogy as well. After being short the nickel, the theater charges you another 30 dollars for not having enough money.
edit on 9-6-2015 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 10:34 AM
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a reply to: Elementalist

The solution is to not use banks. If enough people decline to feed the beast, then it will starve and die.



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 10:44 AM
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I'm most impressed that an 86-year-old woman knows the word "nanosecond". The letter itself, cathartic for certain; however, it was hardly worth the effort. The bank employees probably had a good laugh at the letter and then threw it in the trash.
edit on 9-6-2015 by LeatherNLace because: spelling error



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 10:44 AM
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a reply to: Ahabstar

Impossible in this day and age. I guess it's easy to make that claim if your business still hands out a paper check and all you need to do is go to the local liquor store and cash it for a few bucks, but many corporate businesses require direct deposit now. At the very least, that requires you to have an account for the money to go into and if you still insisted on not using a bank then I guess you could withdraw it after words, but the bank is still making money on your account though (especially if it has a monthly fee or something).

Though going without credit and paying only for what you can afford at that minute while only using a bank for checking and/or savings is MUCH easier to accomplish. Though I hope you only plan on renting in the future (or already own a home flat out which just makes you better off or luckier than most) and don't plan on getting any new cars.



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: Telos

Awesome...

Commerce Bank got caught pulling that stunt and had to pay out to its customers. Apparently they were deducting the highest check amount and then working their way down. This allowed the bank to issue overcharge fees for any transaction that "bounced".

After the lawsuit they are now required to process checks smallest to largest to prevent the, as I call it, snowball effect.

Nothing like a $35.00 charge for 75 cents over the limit.



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 03:50 PM
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originally posted by: Xcathdra
a reply to: Telos

Awesome...

Commerce Bank got caught pulling that stunt and had to pay out to its customers. Apparently they were deducting the highest check amount and then working their way down. This allowed the bank to issue overcharge fees for any transaction that "bounced".




Had a bank do something like this to me once - it's been years, so I'll make up the numbers, but it went like:

Opening balance: $50
Check - $75 - balance: $-25
Overdraft fee $25: - balance - $-50
Check: $20 - balance $-70
Overdraft fee $25 - balance: $-95
Check: $20 - balance $-115
Overdraft fee $25 - balance $-140
Deposit: $200 - balance $60

I complained to no avail - "It's our policy to process debits first, then deposits."



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 04:09 PM
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a reply to: squittles

Yeah debits before deposits was changed.



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: Telos
yes she could of also charged them for her time in writing the letter as well. as we all can.



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 08:00 PM
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Yeah, cute and all, and I'd love for the banks to get a taste of what we go through. But not buying that this is real, and not from an 86 year old woman. Sources prove no authenticity whatsoever.



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 09:32 PM
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I have my very own "stick it to the bank" story.

Years ago I wanted to buy a used car. In my price range the cars weren't that great. And the prices were a lot higher than they should have been for what they were offering. I finally found a car I thought I could get along with if not be happy. The bank went insane over the price compared to the age of the car and the miles on it. My interest rate was very high, almost to the point of making the purchase impossible.

While sitting there looking at the pages and pages of contracts I had to sign, stumbling though all the legal language, and getting more and more frustrated, a thought occurred to me. After about the tenth time of asking what I thought was a simple question and getting a response like, "that's just standard...its in every contract..." Ok, but what does it mean? "Its in every contract..." Yes, but what does it mean? "Do you want to buy the car or not?"

I asked them if I could have a couple minutes to read the lengthy document. They agreed and left me alone. I grabbed a pen, lifted the first page and first carbon (yes, it was that long ago) and went to work. The first copy was my copy. Under the carbon was the remainder of the document which they kept. I signed, got my keys, and left.

I had removed the part about continuing to pay if something happened to the car, several key paragraphs regarding payments and penalties, etc. Unfortunately for the bank, that car was totaled before I ever made a payment, not that I was going to make any payments anyway... I got a call from a guy at the bank saying, "What the &^%%^& do you think you are doing? You cant just change a contract like that." "Well, I did, and you signed it. Its not my fault if you signed it without reading it. Have a nice day."

If the car had not been t-boned by a lady who was late for work, it would have been completely free. It was anyway, so to speak...



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 09:58 PM
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originally posted by: Sublimecraft
a reply to: Telos

Oh my, that's pure gold T, and I thought it ended there, but no, wait theres more..........



I know, right
Priceless !!!



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