It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Children as young as 12 are receiving drugs to prepare them for sex change!

page: 22
51
<< 19  20  21    23  24  25 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:01 PM
link   

originally posted by: OpenMindedRealist
Correct me if I'm wrong, but does the hippocratic oath not say 'above all else - do no harm?' The idea being, medical doctors should not administer treatment if there is a chance of harmful side-effects.

After typing that out, I realize that rule has been ignored for some time...


"Do no harm" doesn't mean to avoid life-saving treatment if there may be a side-effect. If that were the case, we wouldn't get any sort of treatment for anything whatsoever. Look at cancer. Look at sinus infections. Look at just about every ailment. The treatments all have side-effects and potential for serious ones.

"Do no harm" means to not knowingly make a situation worse.




posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:04 PM
link   
Ok, maybe it is because of my "mental illness" that I don't really comprehend what you just said other than you think that JadeStar contributing in a thread that most certainly does pertain to her individually and she is contributing in a relevant and classy manner is not relevant. All that and in the face of such bitter negativity projected towards her and others like her by someone who claims to represent a religion that is supposed to champion love, compassion and forgiveness for all their fellow man.

How you fail to see the relevance is beyond me just like most of that self-righteous rant that you think contributed in a meaningful way.

a reply to: The angel of light

edit on CDTWed, 10 Jun 2015 21:35:17 -0500pmppAmerica/Chicago10-05:00Wed, 10 Jun 2015 21:35:17 -050035 by TrappedPrincess because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:05 PM
link   
a reply to: JadeStar

Does it bother you that you will never be able to reproduce?

Does it bother you that your DNA still shows you are male?


edit on 10-6-2015 by queenofswords because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:11 PM
link   
Almost everything that can be prescribed has some sort of potential side effects. So I guess Doctors should stop giving out medicine all together.

a reply to: OpenMindedRealist



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:17 PM
link   
Snide stinging comments like yours bother me...

a reply to: queenofswords



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:22 PM
link   
I think the more important debate would be:
Who would you rather grab a pint with? JadeStar or The Angel of Light?

JadeStar has my vote hands down!




posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:25 PM
link   

originally posted by: TrappedPrincess
Snide stinging comments like yours bother me...

a reply to: queenofswords



They weren't intended to be snide. Sorry if I came off like that. Really, I'm curious about what a trans person might be bothered by after they make the transition. JadeStar sounds like a pretty happy well-adjusted individual. I don't think the question will be misunderstood by her at all. You seem to be the snippy one.



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:28 PM
link   

originally posted by: ladyvalkyrie
I think the more important debate would be:
Who would you rather grab a pint with? JadeStar or The Angel of Light?

JadeStar has my vote hands down!



JadeStar is thoughtful, intelligent, articulate and delightful. A true "Angel of Light".



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:30 PM
link   
Yes I do get burnt out defending my community sometimes and become snippy but I recall some comments of yours that were less than polite at some point. I lose track with all the threads I'm involved in.

a reply to: queenofswords

edit on CDTWed, 10 Jun 2015 21:37:00 -0500pmppAmerica/Chicago10-05:00Wed, 10 Jun 2015 21:37:00 -050037 by TrappedPrincess because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:35 PM
link   

originally posted by: JadeStar

So do know that this is all closely monitored. I get the impression people think this is being done on a whim or as some kind of Dr. Frankenstein, mad science experiment.



I don't think that. More likely, a lot of people might think as I do, that this isn't real. All of the hormone therapy in the world, and all of the surgery, can't change our genes. It seems like an elaborate disguise, but a disguise, nonetheless.


originally posted by: JadeStar
In many of these kids cases it is deemed an acceptable risk since these drugs have been well studied for years. If you consider the severe unhappiness many are going through and the depression which often has lead to suicide in those who are severely depressed and untreated.


Drastic physical changes to treat an emotional issue seems extreme to me. I understand you have said this worked for you. I am simply not convinced it's the best method. What is, I don't know.


originally posted by: JadeStar
Not that I remember. If they did, they didn't share it with me or my parents. Or my parents didn't share it with me. The last of them seemed very positive with regards to what we were doing and wrote down that I was well adjusted, motivated and happy on her final report which was given to my SRS surgeon.


Well, it's possible that the people chosen were predisposed to agreement that this was a normal thing, and that could lead to bias in treatment. Of course, any treatment wold have some bias, depending on the beliefs of the psychologist.


originally posted by: JadeStar
Yes. And that was ruled out. Like I said, I was given a battery of tests through my childhood. Too many if you ask me. All I wanted was for people to listen and believe me when I told them that I was a girl.


I know it isn't possible, but I'd be very curious to read those reports. How that could be ruled out, I'd like to know.


originally posted by: JadeStar
I was pretty clever and could tell when they were trying to get me to like boy things so yes there was some of that with my first psych but he threw up his hands and referred us to someone else who understood these issues.


So, it is likely the second and third were more inclined to not treat this as a psychological issue. That would make a lot of difference.


originally posted by: JadeStar
LMAO! Transgender people are not mental cases. That was firmly established WAY before I was even born. You may want to do some reading about how they determined that.


That is very widely debated today, for any and all such situations. Many claim it's normal, and many others firmly believe it is a mental condition. I have done quite a lot of reading, from both sides, and the only real conclusion is that no one actually knows for certain. Opinions are firmly held, but there is no concrete proof either way.


originally posted by: JadeStar
When it became apparent to my family and the psych that this wasn't a phase or something I was doing for attention or something which I would outgrow.


I don't think most would be doing something like that for attention. A lot of parents would simply wait, though, and let their child decide once they were grown.


originally posted by: JadeStar
They were treated the same. My parents had the same rules for my older brother as my older sisters (i'm the youngest).


That's a good thing. My own brother (the youngest) wasn't made to follow any rules, though both my sister and I were, and it really messed him up. He's now at the stage of having nothing, blaming everyone, and feeling as though he's entitled to people taking care of him.


originally posted by: JadeStar
We all had to do the same stuff. Dishes, laundry, shovel snow in the winter, rake leaves in the fall, and my brother even babysat me when I was little. My parents didn't really believe in gender differentiation when it came to chores around the house.


They sound very sensible in that regard! That's how mine are treated. The oldest son even got to do a lot of baby-related stuff, since he was old enough when the younger set came along.


originally posted by: JadeStar
It's speculation but that's about all it is. There's more scientific evidence the source of transgenderism begins in the womb long before we're born.


It's speculated because we still really don't know. There can be hormonal issues that could contribute, but those alone aren't enough. Those, along with environment, now, could work together. Our minds are complicated, and there is far more we don't know than we know.


originally posted by: JadeStar
Yes. Until I met my boyfriend, while i was very interested in boys I knew that it was unlikely I would meet one who could understand why I was the way I was. Eventually I met one who didn't care that I was trans and didn't treat me any different from his past girlfriends (for better or worse lol!!!!) and we're still together today.


Does the issue of family ever come up? Doing the natural way wouldn't work, of course, and that can be an issue for some guys.


originally posted by: JadeStar
Yes. A lot of people don't understand this though. We all get lumped together and I have no problem with cross-dressers. I think it's cute in a way but what they feel and experience is vastly different from what I feel and experience. They are guys.


That's my understanding there as well. Odd fashion choices, but nothing else, whereas you felt you were supposed to be female instead of male. Worlds apart.


originally posted by: JadeStar
I would think if it were environmental then there would be wild variations in the incidence of transgenderism around the world because of differences in culture but it turns out that isn't the case. Which in my opinion rules out social environmental factors.


Environmental factors wold only be a part of the issue, I think. Culture, upbringing, and all sorts of other areas, along with some other factors, that are hinted at in some studies. Even actual physical environment cold be a factor, depending.

It's complex, and I do appreciate your sharing your own experience on the issue. You have a viewpoint most of us here do not.



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:37 PM
link   

originally posted by: queenofswords
a reply to: JadeStar

Does it bother you that you will never be able to reproduce?

Does it bother you that your DNA still shows you are male?



Yes and yes.

As I said, it saddens me when I think that I may never be able to have children of my own. But when I consider that I might not even be alive had I not transitioned I realize that I had to sacrifice that to be able to have a normal life.

So there's your answer.

Though with the advances in genetics, nanotechnolgy and medical technology who knows what might be achievable in my lifetime?

It is something I've thought more about as I've now entered my 20s.

Already I know that I could have my and my boyfriend's genetic material put together and brought to term in a surrogate (i think some gay and lesbian couples are already doing this) but it still would not be exactly the same as me carrying a child to birth myself.

I feel that bearing a child and raising them with love is about the best thing in the world any woman can do and I do wish I could have that experience.

Ultimately there is always adoption. There are a lot of people who can reproduce in this world who take that fact for granted and unfortunately there are kids who are parentless so it may be just as fulfilling to be able to make one or several of their lives better by giving them our love.
edit on 10-6-2015 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:38 PM
link   
a reply to: queenofswords



I don't really hate you. But, dang! You ARE tacky!



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:38 PM
link   
I honestly can't say what is my opinion of this. We have psychologists who might be able to say if this is appropriate treatment. I'm sure Trapped Princess could shed some light on it. It seems kind of final for a 12 year old. I would say for most the onset of puberty, by then they know. Yet for others there seems to be a certain confusion for some time.
a reply to: queenofswords



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:42 PM
link   
If I could go back with the knowledge I have now I definitely would have made a plea for my parents to help and 12 would have been the age if I did, that is when I really knew what was up with me without any influence from anyone I just knew. I would have been very bitter towards them had they not allowed me to pursue my transition. As for my real decision on waiting into my 30's is nobody's fault but my own. I regret my cowardice.

a reply to: Parthin96

edit on CDTWed, 10 Jun 2015 21:44:12 -0500pmppAmerica/Chicago10-05:00Wed, 10 Jun 2015 21:44:12 -050044 by TrappedPrincess because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:44 PM
link   
a reply to: JadeStar

As the biological mother of 2, believe me when I tell you...you are not missing anything by not being able to 'have' your own. The best part of being a parent is raising them, watching them grow and learn, being there to support them. Giving them everything thing you wish you had growing up. Save your $ on all the sci-fi crap and just adopt. There are so many kids out there that need loving, supportive homes.

Plus, after you adopt, your body is still going to be in tip top shape. Mine needs surgery to repair all the damage. So count me as one who is jealous of YOU!



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:45 PM
link   
a reply to: JadeStar

Thank you for that honest answer, JadeStar. I really didn't mean the question to be impolite, and I think you know that. I'm very curious, and I have done a lot of research lately about it. I do think the fact that more and more children are expressing transgender feelings tells me something is going on. I appreciate your feedback.

edit on 10-6-2015 by queenofswords because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:51 PM
link   

originally posted by: TrappedPrincess
If I could go back with the knowledge I have now I definitely would have made a plea for my parents to help and 12 would have been the age if I did, that is when I really knew what was up with me without any influence from anyone I just knew. I would have been very bitter towards them had they not allowed me to pursue my transition. As for my real decision on waiting into my 30's is nobody's fault but my own. I regret my cowardice.

a reply to: Parthin96


I can feel your feelings of regret and I just want to hug you and say that even though you waited until into your 30s because you were afraid what your family or society would think, you still may be seen as lucky by others not as fortunate. Remember that however bad we have it, someone probably had it worse.



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:53 PM
link   

originally posted by: queenofswords

originally posted by: TrappedPrincess
Snide stinging comments like yours bother me...

a reply to: queenofswords



They weren't intended to be snide. Sorry if I came off like that. Really, I'm curious about what a trans person might be bothered by after they make the transition. JadeStar sounds like a pretty happy well-adjusted individual. I don't think the question will be misunderstood by her at all. You seem to be the snippy one.


For the record I didn't think it was snide. I however can see, without being able to read facial expressions or hear how a question is phrased how just the words themselves could look like a snide line of questioning.

I didn't get that feeling from you when you asked though.



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 10:04 PM
link   

originally posted by: ladyvalkyrie
a reply to: JadeStar

As the biological mother of 2, believe me when I tell you...you are not missing anything by not being able to 'have' your own. The best part of being a parent is raising them, watching them grow and learn, being there to support them. Giving them everything thing you wish you had growing up. Save your $ on all the sci-fi crap and just adopt. There are so many kids out there that need loving, supportive homes.


Thank you. :hearts:

I really appreciate your kind words.

When my older sister was pregnant with my niece when I was 16 she had me place my hand on her belly so I could feel her kicking as she sang to her. I thought that was JUST SO COOL!!! And I guess ever since then I wondered what it would be like.

Then there is the whole thing of, when I get older other women my age will have had kids and so like, what do I say? I mean that is a shared experience, having kids kind of goes along with being a mom unless one adopted.

So like, i could adopt but then if they ask me how it was through my pregnancy then I'd have to tell them that I adopted, then they might if they were a close friend ask why i chose to adopt rather than have my own, then i'd have to spill the beans about being trans or make up a lie about being infertile.

See what I mean? Suddenly I'd have a difference which might be off putting. I might be out of the circle of natural mothers, etc. You know?



Plus, after you adopt, your body is still going to be in tip top shape. Mine needs surgery to repair all the damage. So count me as one who is jealous of YOU!


Omg! Lol, thank you, that makes me feel a lot better
but I still think I'd trade my body, nice as it is, for natural motherhood later when i'm like older. I guess I've always been that way. I've always wanted to eventually get married and be a mom.



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 10:05 PM
link   

originally posted by: queenofswords
a reply to: JadeStar

Thank you for that honest answer, JadeStar. I really didn't mean the question to be impolite, and I think you know that. I'm very curious, and I have done a lot of research lately about it. I do think the fact that more and more children are expressing transgender feelings tells me something is going on. I appreciate your feedback.


Your welcome. Feel free to ask me anything.




top topics



 
51
<< 19  20  21    23  24  25 >>

log in

join