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Keeping felons from earning a living doesn't make us safer, only poorer

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posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 12:44 PM
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As many of you know I've personally experienced a lot of struggle with this issue. I have been very blessed to have great friends and family who have support me through some of the harder times. I still struggle but I work hard to start my own business and things have slowly been getting better. However this is not the case for a lot of people who end up back in the system.

The article touches on a few key points I would like to share with the community.

The Guardian


And men with criminal records account for about 34% of all nonworking men of prime working age.


So weather or not the economy is recovering or not it's hard to tell. I know for a fact I could get a job next week without my criminal record. It's violent. I for sure know it's my fault, it was a completely stupids mistake but I was a moron in my early 20's. I turn 30 in two weeks.


I’m grateful that I had the ability to set-up my own company, but that’s not possible for everyone with a record. I was fortunate enough to have the necessary skills to provide a service and I had access to the capital necessary to get my business started.


This man is very lucky that he had investment capital. But he knows the struggle....


In 2008, the reduced job prospects of people with felony convictions cost the US economy between $57 and $65 bn in lost output. At the individual level, serving time reduces annual earnings for men by 40%, meaning families too often fall into a poverty trap.


This is affecting the entire economy. Not just these hardcore criminals trying to get a job.


edit on 6/7/2015 by onequestion because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 12:52 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

After 9/11 . Every place needed a background check to get a job. That is why i had to start my own business!



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 12:56 PM
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originally posted by: DEANORULES24
a reply to: onequestion

After 9/11 . Every place needed a background check to get a job. That is why i had to start my own business!


Background checks have been going on way before 9/11.



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 01:00 PM
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originally posted by: thesaneone

originally posted by: DEANORULES24
a reply to: onequestion

After 9/11 . Every place needed a background check to get a job. That is why i had to start my own business!


Background checks have been going on way before 9/11.

Not for construction jobs . That started only after 9/11 !



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 01:03 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

This is definitely a difficult subject.

There is no real way to "force" employers to hire anyone with a record and I even understand their reluctance to an extent. However with our prison population ever growing, more and more people will be entering the work force with a prison record. An arrest record at the very least.

I feel that many times, a person with a severe record, even if all they wanted to do was live a happy, productive life, would possibly be forced into crime in order to simply support themselves..

Bad situation all around..

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 01:04 PM
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a reply to: DEANORULES24

Yeah it got really bad.

The thing is the majority of crime at the workplace are commit by people without records so it's not an honest indicator of future crimes.



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 01:07 PM
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a reply to: semperfortis

Thanks Semper for commenting considering your profession Id be interested to hear more seeing as you may no more about the impact of this than a lot of us.

The solution in my eyes is sealing records and making them only accessible according to relevancy similar to Germanies system of record checking.



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 01:13 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

I think that is one of the major problems..

It used to be in order to get a criminal record, you had to go through us.. Now they are almost all online for anyone..

There is very little a person can not find out about us if they look.

I believe, perhaps in error but I still believe, the recidivism rate is as high as it is due to people having no other options.

Even in my profession I can tell you this. I will feed my family.



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 01:16 PM
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I have always thought this.

Really I think criminal records should be private except in special cases were needed.

IE if you have a record for rape or violence it should flag up for a job with children or vunrable people

Record for theft /fraud should only flag up for jobs around money or personal values.

Murderors and pedos should not get out of prison full stop.

edit on 7-6-2015 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-6-2015 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 01:16 PM
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The biggest problem with this situation is the fact that felons who can't find a job will typically resort to crime to survive.

Even if they've been rehabilitated in jail, if they're faced with being homeless... what do you think they'll do?



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 01:19 PM
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The way felons are treated after paying their debt to society is simply wrong.

If you commit a crime, get busted, do your time and get out and seek to change your life, but everything is stacked against you, how are you to break the cycle in this circumstance?

Non-violent felons should not have to pay for their mistakes long after they are released from prison.
edit on pSun, 07 Jun 2015 13:21:57 -050020157America/Chicago2015-06-07T13:21:57-05:0030vx6 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 01:27 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn

I'm a violent felon but I never did prison time I only served a few short months and was released back into society.

That was almost six years ago.

How long after should I continue to serve a sentence?

Just trying to establish a frame of reference.



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 01:28 PM
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The deck is certainly stacked, but it's a fight I think can be won even if not everybody can win. I started my career as a temp on Huber for a felony conviction (21 yrs old after fighting it for a few years). All I could do was pull up the bootstraps and keep fighting for some semblance of normalcy.

12 years later and I run a shop and my conviction doesn't play a roll in my life outside of not being able to take my daughter gun hunting. She'll just have to start recurve training 😊 get those arms built up.

I have tried to hire people from Huber and with records almost out of spite for a system that seems stacked, not because they shouldn't have records (most of the time they are deserved), but because they shouldn't be punished after the fact after they have served their sentences and / or owned up to what they did.

Redemption is best earned, not served



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 01:31 PM
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I was actually just thinking about this the other day. I work with a guy who is really friendly and has a Master's degree. He could be doing good work and helping other people, but he happens to have a felony charge, so he's basically unable to get any sort of decent job and can't even afford a car. The situation isn't doing anything positive for anyone.

The prison system and attitude towards criminals in the US needs some major change. There's a reason we have both the highest incarceration rate and one of the highest recidivism rates in the world. The system only serves itself.



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 01:36 PM
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a reply to: semperfortis


Even in my profession I can tell you this. I will feed my family.


Herein lies the real problem.

Not only would you do this but many do actually do whatever it takes. This is why organized crime is so strong in the US. This is how La Cosa Nostra can still conduct 50 billion a year in business transactions in the US.



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 01:37 PM
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I agree, a person who has previously committed a crime, even a felony, should be able to prove himself. Particularly if the criminal act occurred in one's twenties. Teens are protected, but the twenties are just barely a step away from the screwballness which is the teens.

No offense 20 years old. Someday you will see it's often the case, and wonder how you survived your twenties. I know I do.

OP I hate that for you. You will meet someone who is willing to take a chance on you. In fact I think I am more optimistic about your future than you are. Never give up.



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 01:46 PM
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originally posted by: DEANORULES24

originally posted by: thesaneone

originally posted by: DEANORULES24
a reply to: onequestion

After 9/11 . Every place needed a background check to get a job. That is why i had to start my own business!


Background checks have been going on way before 9/11.

Not for construction jobs . That started only after 9/11 !



I didn't know "every place" means construction jobs but that's still false unless you are talking government construction jobs?



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 01:51 PM
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originally posted by: crazyewok

Record for theft /fraud should only flag up for jobs around money or personal values.



?????

Don't all jobs deal with "money and personal value" in one way or another?



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 01:56 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

Not sure what you did and really don't care.

If you're looking to start a life free from those things that brought you to judge and jury and have paid your debt that should be it.

My philosophy is this "I don't care where you've been, only where you're going". If our justice system was a bit more forward thinking I believe people in your position would be far better off.



posted on Jun, 7 2015 @ 01:58 PM
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a reply to: thesaneone

All I know, where I am from I never had to have a background check for any job I applied for before 9/11!
BUT after 9/11 ! EVERY JOB I applied for I had to have one. Your right you are special!!



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