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Liquid on Mars, NASA Photos, up close SOL 0712

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posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 04:47 PM
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a reply to: Char-Lee

did we ? its been a while now , maybe .., it was back in 2012 when the plumes were sighted.. but then I think we've covered quite a bit of eye mileage in them threads


im not going to look back though


funbox




posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 08:41 PM
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originally posted by: funbox
a reply to: Char-Lee

interesting plumes in that article ? must have missed that one, the article goes on to say they hung around for ten days , quite a long time for material cast up by a meteorite to hang about for , given that wonderful suspending power of the atmosphere


funbox



You misunderstand the properties of Mars itself! The atmosphere is very tenuous, for sure, but the particulate mass is also very low - Martian dust is like Talcom powder - extremely low mass. So what seems improbable here on Earth Is totally possible on Mars.



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 08:42 PM
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originally posted by: tigertatzen
a reply to: MarsIsRed

Oh, no worries at all...I think we're all just very passionate and sometimes that translates to aggression via the typed word. I am no different, so my apologies as well if I came across as being growly!


Cool! Still friends!!!!



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:08 PM
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a reply to: MarsIsRed

20 days.. and the wind never coerced these particulates? as below? (see discussion with Phage) if it wasn't being suspended somehow , how is it that it stayed for 20 days.. given these particulates where cast up by the leading theory of a meteor strikes , but then meteor strikes wouldn't exclude material that was bigger than talcum powder


funbox



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:10 PM
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originally posted by: LuckyYurg
a reply to: Mianeye

Cheers for that. looking at the gigapan, it's possible that a third drip, that has dried more than the two obvious ones might be there. You'll notice the two obvious drips start in cracks or holes in the rock, there is another such crack between them, and if you look down from that crack, another drip like mark, although lighter in color, maybe it's older and not as wet. But the third one still has the look of a drip, pooled at the base



They do look like artesian wells, but the only reason that their is no liquid water on the surface is because of the low atmospheric pressure, if it came up from a thousand feet below the surface , the pressure might be enough to contain water in a liquid state, until it evaporated. If their is h2o in the atmosphere, I guess that's where it must have come from. At some point during the Martian winter, some where back down the channel it could have an ice plug .



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: anonentity

could be onto something , in a similar and smaller scale fashion to the pictures of the sprayer.

that one on Skipper's site



maybe that nozzle is formed when the pressure hits the atmosphere.

funbox




edit on 10-6-2015 by funbox because: wolves & waterslides



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:42 PM
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originally posted by: funbox
a reply to: MarsIsRed

20 days.. and the wind never coerced these particulates? as below? (see discussion with Phage) if it wasn't being suspended somehow , how is it that it stayed for 20 days.. given these particulates where cast up by the leading theory of a meteor strikes , but then meteor strikes wouldn't exclude material that was bigger than talcum powder


funbox



which discussion with Phage?



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:46 PM
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a reply to: MarsIsRed

in this very thread , in regards to atmospheric suspension and flow

funbox



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 09:48 PM
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a reply to: funbox

Sounds like a reasonable assumption, I wonder what the soil temperature of Mars is like . If its like Earth and the temp goes up ,as you go down . Then you could have some interesting terrestrial conditions at certain depths, away from the radiation. If in the past asteroid bombardment, fractured the rock, then you could be looking at the place where all the water is. In deep deposits, as warm liquid.



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 10:03 PM
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a reply to: anonentity

maybe a life form has found a way to survive such extremity's , it oozes its way to the surface to feed on highly energetic surface rocks








funbox



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 10:48 PM
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a reply to: funbox

Its a good bet that something live is there. Extremophiles on Earth can live in more extreme conditions than exist on Mars. But defining what constitutes " life" could be problematic. If it Universally requires DNA. I doubt whether it would be stable enough on the surface. Even on earth at twelve thousand feet , certain plants and flowers get a dose of radiation and mutate.



posted on Jun, 11 2015 @ 12:28 PM
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originally posted by: funbox
a reply to: anonentity

maybe a life form has found a way to survive such extremity's , it oozes its way to the surface to feed on highly energetic surface rocks




funbox

Perhaps an abolonisc type creature!





posted on Jun, 11 2015 @ 12:35 PM
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originally posted by: anonentity
a reply to: funbox

Its a good bet that something live is there. Extremophiles on Earth can live in more extreme conditions than exist on Mars. But defining what constitutes " life" could be problematic. If it Universally requires DNA. I doubt whether it would be stable enough on the surface. Even on earth at twelve thousand feet , certain plants and flowers get a dose of radiation and mutate.





Mars's surface receives more radiation than the Earth's but still blocks a considerable amount. Radiation exposure on the surface is 30 µSv per hour during solar minimum; during solar maximum, dosage equivalent of this exposure is reduced by the factor two (2). - See more at: www.mars-one.com...

When life formed and the planet changed I think the creatures simply change also. These vents were not always there but what happened when they opened up in an animal's environment?



Since their discovery, hydrothermal vents have overthrown many theories scientists had regarding deep sea life. The temperature of the waters surrounding these vents exceed the boiling point, but the sheer pressure of those depths prevents any bubbles from appearing. Hydrogen sulphide constantly jets out of the vents, a highly toxic substance for most life forms. However, these hellish vents are often surrounded by colonies of various wildlife, most of which obviously thrive in a toxic, sunless world.

listverse.com...



posted on Jun, 11 2015 @ 12:35 PM
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a reply to: Char-Lee

interesting photos there mate , what are the chance's that two rocks on mars have similar marking/patterning's, as your rock corals ? are they some kind of sea dwelling rock filterer ? do you know if those markings on the earthly creatures are some kind of courtship markings or tubes for breathing or ??

funbox



posted on Jun, 11 2015 @ 12:58 PM
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originally posted by: funbox
a reply to: Char-Lee

interesting photos there mate , what are the chance's that two rocks on mars have similar marking/patterning's, as your rock corals ? are they some kind of sea dwelling rock filterer ? do you know if those markings on the earthly creatures are some kind of courtship markings or tubes for breathing or ??

funbox

These type have respiratory pores in a row near the shell's outer edge
en.wikipedia.org...

I am sure many creature of the sea would adapt if the seas were gone, many already have thick shells for protection and they could burrow under to the moisture and come up to feed. We have learned that species can adapt to environmental changes very quickly.
They are beginning to change and adapt here even now...


This rapid adaptation is occurring around the world. British researchers recently analyzed more than 2,000 animal and plant species in Britain and found that many had already made significant adaptations to a changing environment.

blogs.reuters.com...

Historically the little people they found in Indonesia (would have stood about 3.5 feet (1.1 m) in height and the dwarf elephant there, seem to have become small very quickly to adapt to the Island they were on.



This has led the discoverers of H. floresiensis to conclude that the species, or its ancestors, could only have reached the isolated island by water transport, perhaps arriving in bamboo rafts around 100,000 years ago (or, if they are H. erectus, then about 1 million years ago).
The species is thought to have survived on Flores at least until 12,000 years before present, making it the longest lasting non-modern human

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jun, 11 2015 @ 01:16 PM
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a reply to: Char-Lee

the remnants of the lake that once was , they certainly have the same look about them, maybe there's a whole subset of them

do you know how mollusc's on earth deal with temperature inversions such as we see on mars , when temperatures become freezing , could these critters lapse into a state of suspended animation *cryogenics*, until the sun comes up ?

im sure old Walt is hoping it does , in whatever winter-wonder-dreamland he's in


funbox



posted on Jun, 11 2015 @ 02:34 PM
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a reply to: funbox
My favorite subject :-)
I think lichens and lichen eating creatures would be very adaptable to the mars changes.


One of the most successful alliances in the natural world often goes unnoticed. It involves either an alga or a bacterium that harvests energy from the sun to make its own nutrients. It shares this bounty with a fungus, which reciprocates by providing it with shelter. Together, the associates form a dual organism known as a lichen.

This alliance is so successful that lichens have colonised every continent, including Antarctica.

blogs.discovermagazine.com...

geosciencebigpicture.com...
What if a lichen grew larger and could move around?
white shield lichen

THIS is a rock eating creature

Black Tar lichen

Would we know it?

It can be difficult to believe, but these “rocks” are living, breathing organisms. Their appearance allows them to blend into Chilean beaches and avoid predators. Interestingly, these creatures have both male and female organs and can breed individually.
distractify.com...


A "devil worm" has been discovered miles under the Earth—the deepest-living animal ever found, a new study says.

news.nationalgeographic.com...


the green sea slug can get all of its energy from the sun, like a plant.

umich.uloop.com...
Or developed Lithotroph... is the term used to describe bacteria that acquire their energy from an inorganic substrate. Hetero lithotrophic bacteria are very rare.
Read more : www.ehow.com...

Ok I will stop



posted on Jun, 11 2015 @ 02:48 PM
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originally posted by: funbox
a reply to: Char-Lee

the remnants of the lake that once was , they certainly have the same look about them, maybe there's a whole subset of them
do you know how mollusc's on earth deal with temperature inversions such as we see on mars , when temperatures become freezing , could these critters lapse into a state of suspended animation *cryogenics*, until the sun comes up ?
im sure old Walt is hoping it does , in whatever winter-wonder-dreamland he's in

funbox

I know that many creatures go dormant and they are finding more that have antifreeze in their blood, some develop their own electricity but i think the sun would be used to generate heat on Mars too.
Underwater McMurdo
www.coolantarctica.com...


I think we need look at creatures like the Water Bear: Low water content of the creature is a part of this the need for little water and using salt water, well if one creature can adapt this way why not others?



Despite its looks and size, it’s the world’s ranking winner at cold survival—it can stay alive (though only for a few minutes) at -459 degrees F, which is about 1 degree above absolute zero. It does this by being one of the few creatures that can survive a drop in its metabolism to 0.01 percent of normal and decrease its water content to 1 percent.

But it can take more than cold. Hearty water bears can withstand the vacuum and high radiation of outer space for at least 10 days (humans can take no more than 10 gamma-rays of radiation; water bears can survive 6,200); the pressure of the deepest sea, some 6,000 times that of the Earth’s surface (14.7 pounds per square inch); and dehydration for nearly a full decade.

www.nwf.org...



posted on Jun, 11 2015 @ 03:25 PM
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a reply to: MarsIsRed




So what seems improbable here on Earth Is totally possible on Mars.



Yes! We can't hold our Earth out as a comparison to another planet that does not share the same atmospheric conditions, physical conditions, etc. and expect that what we know (or believe we know) to be true here will also be true there. That cookie-cutter mentality is keeping people from seeing all the wonderful possibilities out there by stubbornly and rigidly clinging to laws of science that are only known to be applicable here.



posted on Jun, 11 2015 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: Char-Lee

exactly, and salt water is more likely to be present for longer given its lower freezing point.

great pictures and info matey , ermmm that black tar lichen looks almost good enough to pick with a spoon


funbox



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