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Picture of free flowing water on Mars?

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posted on Dec, 24 2004 @ 01:20 PM
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This image has been 'Photoshopped'.....

The file has been written by Adobe Photshop 4. Use any text editor (I prefer UltraEdit 32 because of the Hex/column features) to open the image and you'll see the proof yourself.


NVBadBoy




posted on Dec, 24 2004 @ 01:50 PM
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Originally posted by theRiverGoddess

Originally posted by Makuahine
this picture shows only wet sand. I don't believe this is a pool of water.



Excuse me? WET SAND? but no water? explain to me HOW the sand got wet in the first place??............hello? please answer this?

Odd pic I must say.....looks very much like pics I have taken up close of waterfalls against rock.......in Utah USA at least..........................
I have no opinion though, about WHAT this is on Mars........just wondering if its wet sand, HOW it got 'wet'?


Obviously, you didn't read my entire post-I said I believe there is liquid water on Mars and that there probably was water flowing from under the rock (which is how the sand got wet) but I believe the picture being referenced in this thread is showing only wet sand and not a standing pool of water.



posted on Dec, 24 2004 @ 01:57 PM
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Originally posted by cmdrkeenkid
I'm going to have to say no for this one. Can someone find the picture on a NASA website? That may help. To me this looks like it's zoomed in on something real close.


Here's the Mars Rover page that contains this picture:
marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov...



posted on Dec, 24 2004 @ 02:13 PM
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Originally posted by Makuahine
Here's the Mars Rover page that contains this picture:
marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov...


Great job! Thanks!

Well, folks, after looking at ALL the photos on that page, I think it looks like mud or fine sand. There's a couple of images where you can clearly see some sort of "lip" inside the "water" area.

So I'm going to say "no" to free standing liquid" but "yes" to "might have been at one time but not now."

What do the rest of you think?



posted on Dec, 24 2004 @ 02:17 PM
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Umm, to me it kinda looks like Steppes formed through seizmic activity under water. Just a guess though...



posted on Dec, 24 2004 @ 02:26 PM
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ok, here it is in color.
I made it from 3 filtered frames taken on sol 307.
Being filtered, this is NOT totally accurate color, but very close.
I think it's talcum-fine sand. It lso looks to be possibly electrostatically charged, where the particles are repelling each other...Making it very loosely packed.
Could also explain why they don't stick to the rover solar panels very easily.
(see multiple threads on the Rover being "washed")..




Have at it!

[edit on 24-12-2004 by spacedoubt]



posted on Dec, 24 2004 @ 05:29 PM
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Nice work spacedoubt!



posted on Dec, 24 2004 @ 06:18 PM
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NASA image info
Left Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 307 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 16:07:51 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 7 (432 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell


Under this specific filter, and several others, it looks like a small pool of water in the bottom right. It appears to have depth and i can almost see what looks to be the formation of pebble type objects and sand (which are surrounding the immidiate area) under shallow water, an optical illusion? Or a trick of the lense?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------





NASA image info
Right Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 307 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 11:42:38 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 1 (436 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell


Under this filter it looks nothing more than very small tightly knit grains of sand. I cant decide either way on this but if it is water and not sand then that leaves a whole host of unanswered questions.



[edit on 24-12-2004 by MERC]



posted on Dec, 24 2004 @ 08:15 PM
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Originally posted by picard_is_actually_a_grey
We're not talking cliffs and lakes here, we're talking rocks and a puddle, i believe this is taken from one of the cams from the rovers. It looks pretty clear cut to me, small puddle bottom right hand corner, with wet sand around the rocks.


What?!

If it is a small "puddle" which in any language is...well water then the "puddle" should reflect anything around it, and if you actually look...it does not do this.

Simple, therefore it is not water.



posted on Dec, 24 2004 @ 08:31 PM
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Originally posted by markjaxson

Originally posted by picard_is_actually_a_grey
We're not talking cliffs and lakes here, we're talking rocks and a puddle, i believe this is taken from one of the cams from the rovers. It looks pretty clear cut to me, small puddle bottom right hand corner, with wet sand around the rocks.


What?!

If it is a small "puddle" which in any language is...well water then the "puddle" should reflect anything around it, and if you actually look...it does not do this.

Simple, therefore it is not water.


Who knows markjaxson, who knows......



posted on Dec, 25 2004 @ 12:37 AM
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I'd like to issue an addendum to my previous post at the top of the page.

After reviewing the original mars rover pictures, it appears that the water in question is most likely fine ground sand, silica or diatomaceous 'earth'-like material. The parts of the image that look like wet sand and even puddles of water, have been created by the filters on the camera. I noticed that each image has a slightly different shade of darkness and the appearance of the 'water' changes with each filter setting. Some of the pictures display 'submerged' pebbles; others show no pebbles, while another image shows lots of pebbles, but in murky 'water'.

Therefore, it is my opinion that the picture in question does not show water or any kind of liquid.

However, I am not saying that water did not exist on Mars. With all of the claims of polar ice caps on Mars, consisting of carbon dioxide, I'm not ruling out anything.


NVBadBoy



posted on Dec, 25 2004 @ 08:01 PM
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.
One other thing that strikes me as odd is that the squarish slabs seem to have a definite linear grain to them.

I'm no geologist, but doesn't a linear grain usually mean sedimentary rock?

I suppose it could be sand erosion from wind blowing from that direction...

Any thoughts?
.



posted on Dec, 27 2004 @ 08:40 AM
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possibly...just possibly it's one of the 2:

1-Murky Water which shows no reflection.
2-Ice, most likely possibility.

So this pic is from the rover correct?



posted on Dec, 27 2004 @ 08:44 AM
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There's no question that there was once water on mars...Nasa scientists have come to that conlcusion. So all the talk of maybe there was once water on mars is not getting you anywhere.



posted on Dec, 27 2004 @ 11:01 AM
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It appears as though the image has been magnified, but it has also been doctored on photoshop. Looks like the blurr tool. Plus there are no reflections, and you can see parts where the blurr tool meshed with the other colors or rocks in the surrounding environment. I say fake, or show me the link on the Nasa site and ill take another look.



posted on Dec, 27 2004 @ 03:37 PM
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I think it is very unlikely anyway, given the normal temperatures on Mars... Although the atmosphere pressure is far less than on earth (about 1/100 to 1/150), I think it would be very lucky to picture liquid water...

Temperature on Mars overview
Pressure on Mars overview

Make your own opinion, but I think it is not liquid water. It may be liquid, but not water, or it may be water, but frozen...



posted on Dec, 27 2004 @ 04:48 PM
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if you look at the ice/mud/powder you can see structures under the serface of it You cant see whats under mud or powder so that leaves water and ice....


Xon

posted on Dec, 27 2004 @ 05:10 PM
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If tis whater does thet mean that there is life there? Nice job whit the collor pic



posted on Dec, 27 2004 @ 10:24 PM
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Pathfinder had mud on its wheels and Spirit and Opportunity both have come across water in their journeys on the Mars surface. The Mars surface is like a sponge the dew at night seeps back through the surface and repeats the cycle. The dew is grabbing the dust from the rover's solar panels and dripping back to the surface. Mars is loaded with water trapped beneath the surface and is under pressure leaving it in a liquid state versus a frozen state. Geysers have been detected on the surface of Mars, verifying water is under pressure. The Sandmaries are pumping or free flowing water into tiny tiny silver cylindrical holding tanks. This was very apparent from photos taken by the Pathfinder/Sojourner mission. This is not a joke on Mars what you think and see is isn't and what you think and see isn't is. Rik Riley



posted on Dec, 27 2004 @ 11:23 PM
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If it was anything seirous it would have been geting masive meida coverage. Even anything remotly involved in mars "consparicy" gets 1st priorties. Look at how much coverage the solar pannel cleanings got and look how little the mars science developments get. Simply because
1. NASA Has not called attention to these photos or even rebuked them and no tposted them. literlaly these missions generally take several hundred THOUSAND immages. if they removed 6 or 7 no one would know
2. it has got no meida covereage anywhere
3. it looks like fine sand to me.

I don't think there is anything specail about this immage.

On a side note. The mars THEMIS satelite that orbits the planet and takes high resolution THERMAL immages ioften produces immages close to that same type. it looks photshope docterd and like something CG. What camera was this taken with it may be a thermal immage?




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