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Killer trys to kill again More proof that life should mean LIFE.

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posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 12:42 PM
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A man who repeatedly stabbed his neighbour in a frenzied attack was on parole at the time after serving nearly 30 years for killing a teenager. Keith Williams attacked Amaris Hatton, 35, with such aggression that the tip of the knife used was left lodged in her skull.

source

This POS nearly got to join this disgusting list of other scumbags who have murdered and been released on parole to kill AGAIN.

Sorry but premeditated murder should mean life. No parole, no release on good behavior.


I am all for rehabilitation for other crimes. I am all for reduced or non prisons sentences for non violent crimes.

But Pre meditated Murders and pedophilia I draw a zero tolerance view on.

Releases monsters such as these is a risk to society.




posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 12:46 PM
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a reply to: crazyewok

Couldn't agree more if I wanted to.

This sort of thing is why we have capital punishment. Not as a deterrent, but as a way to make sure that animals like this never, ever hurt anyone again.



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 12:47 PM
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originally posted by: crazyewok



A man who repeatedly stabbed his neighbour in a frenzied attack was on parole at the time after serving nearly 30 years for killing a teenager. Keith Williams attacked Amaris Hatton, 35, with such aggression that the tip of the knife used was left lodged in her skull.

source

This POS nearly got to join this disgusting list of other scumbags who have murdered and been released on parole to kill AGAIN.

Sorry but premeditated murder should mean life. No parole, no release on good behavior.


I am all for rehabilitation for other crimes. I am all for reduced or non prisons sentences for non violent crimes.

But Pre meditated Murders and pedophilia I draw a zero tolerance view on.

Releases monsters such as these is a risk to society.


Sounds like something a person with a gun could have taken care of rather quickly.....

Not sure why this guy isn't dead. From the circumstances of his last victim:



Williams’ was sentenced for the manslaughter of 17-year-old Miss Croft in 1986 rather than murder, because of his mental health problems.

He had become obsessed with the teenager, from Hastings, and repeatedly stabbed her with a kitchen knife. She was five months pregnant at the time.

Mr Bennetts said: “He stamped on her face with a boot, there was an allegation of sexual assault and before leaving the premises he put a duvet over her body and set fire to her body.”


I have no idea why there is an ounce of breath wasted on this guy.....put a bullet in his head and be done with him.....nothing saving about him at all, mental illness or not....put him down.



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 12:48 PM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: crazyewok

Couldn't agree more if I wanted to.

This sort of thing is why we have capital punishment. Not as a deterrent, but as a way to make sure that animals like this never, ever hurt anyone again.


We got rid of it in the UK. Personally I am against capital punishment but events like make me question my view.

I am at a point were if the UK had another capital punishment vote I would vote against but if the yes vote won I would not not exactly waste m time protesting or shedding tears.



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 12:49 PM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe

Can we NOT turn this into a anti/pro gun thread?

Guns are NOT the topic. Its bad sentencing guidelines.

UK is NOT the USA
edit on 2-6-2015 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 12:52 PM
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a reply to: crazyewok

I'm betwixt and between over capital punishment myself. It's kinda hard to undo it, if a mistake is found in the court proceedings...

But instances like this, that seem so very cut and dried? I don't have a real issue with it. Or life should indeed mean life. Tack on some hard labor to that so we get something out of our tax monies.



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 12:54 PM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: crazyewok

I'm betwixt and between over capital punishment myself. It's kinda hard to undo it, if a mistake is found in the court proceedings...

But instances like this, that seem so very cut and dried? I don't have a real issue with it. Or life should indeed mean life. Tack on some hard labor to that so we get something out of our tax monies.


Thats my concern too mistakes. One dead innocent by accident seems to high a price.


But I agree with hard labour too and life without parole. In someways death penalty is a easy way out. I would rather have that than life without parole in a grotty prison.



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 12:55 PM
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originally posted by: crazyewok
a reply to: Vasa Croe

Can we NOT turn this into a anti/pro gun thread?

Guns are NOT the topic. Its bad sentencing guidelines.

UK is NOT the USA


Sure thing. I perfectly understand the US is not the UK. From his prior killing, what were the sentencing guidelines at the time, and was capital punishment around 30 years ago? Did he get out of it solely based on a mental illness claim? If so, then I would say a crime as heinous as his first one should have been a life sentence in a mental facility if that is the defense. I mean he killed a pregnant girl, stomped her head in, then set her on fire.....and they let him out of the facility?



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 12:59 PM
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Capital punishment is short sighted, its giving them the easy way out. People like the one mentioned in the OP, should be put on lock down 23 hours a day for the rest of there natural lives. A much worse punishment than a quick death.



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 01:00 PM
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a reply to: crazyewok

It is.

Better that 10 guilty men go free, then an innocent die by mistake.



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 01:02 PM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe
Thanks


Capital punishment was abolished in 1965 for all but treason and piracy and even then had not been used since 1964. so he would have avoided that.

As for sentencing. I think murder can be as low as 14 years BUT 20-30 years is the norm before being considered parole.

As for mental health......well in the 80's the government shut most of the mental hospitals down. Due to that there is extremely few hospitals catered for such violent mental health patients so they just get dropped in our cat A prisons (like your supermax) or if you do get in one you end transferred to a normal prison if your viewed as "better".



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 01:08 PM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe

I know! And up here in Canada (look up, look waaay up) we have a couple of horrendous killers that are let out as well, much to the total disgust of everyone. Their mental status was totally off the wall when they committed their crimes, but now that their medication has stabilized them, the doctors say they are fine. So what? That they can be presumed to be responsible citizens once again is a notion that is foisted on us by the mental health authorities. Well none of us are buying. Next thing you know they will pronounce Luka Magnotta ok and try to make us swallow that. Paroling episodic sicko killers IMO is a form of dementia itself.



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 01:09 PM
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originally posted by: crazyewok
a reply to: Vasa Croe
Thanks


Capital punishment was abolished in 1965 for all but treason and piracy and even then had not been used since 1964. so he would have avoided that.

As for sentencing. I think murder can be as low as 14 years BUT 20-30 years is the norm before being considered parole.

As for mental health......well in the 80's the government shut most of the mental hospitals down. Due to that there is extremely few hospitals catered for such violent mental health patients so they just get dropped in our cat A prisons (like your supermax) or if you do get in one you end transferred to a normal prison if your viewed as "better".


Is there any kind of caveat for multiple offenses? I mean, sure he didn't kill this last victim, but the crime was similar to the first. I would think there would be something in the law there that would allow for "throwing away the key" if there was a second similar offense after being released.

If not, then I would say this case, specifically, should be used to try to push such a law.



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 01:10 PM
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a reply to: Subaeruginosa

Ordinary criminals, yes, I could bring myself to agree with you in many, if not most, circumstances.

But this, or ones like it? They don't feel guilt. Ever.

For these sorts, however... nothing less than death is called for. Not as punishment. Because for punishment to be effective, one has to feel remorse... These didn't/don't...

Oh, a few of 'em made noises like they did, but look into their eyes... There's no remorse. None.

The death penalty is a safety measure. To remove any possibility of them ever getting out. Ever hurting another living thing.

You've discovered a huge issue for me. A pet peeve, if you will.



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 01:12 PM
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originally posted by: aboutface
a reply to: Vasa Croe

I know! And up here in Canada (look up, look waaay up) we have a couple of horrendous killers that are let out as well, much to the total disgust of everyone. Their mental status was totally off the wall when they committed their crimes, but now that their medication has stabilized them, the doctors say they are fine. So what? That they can be presumed to be responsible citizens once again is a notion that is foisted on us by the mental health authorities. Well none of us are buying. Next thing you know they will pronounce Luka Magnotta ok and try to make us swallow that. Paroling episodic sicko killers IMO is a form of dementia itself.



My main issue with letting anyone out that has a mental illness that requires medication is that those with mental illness tend to quit taking their medication once they "feel" they are fine.

I am speaking from many years of experience of dealing with a family stalker that is released every 6-9 months and about 3 months after, he starts back in with the threats and showing up places myself or my wife are, such as restaurants, work, etc...

He has yet to actually do anything, but with mental illness, I do not want to have to wait for that.



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 01:12 PM
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originally posted by: Vasa Croe

originally posted by: crazyewok
a reply to: Vasa Croe
Thanks


Capital punishment was abolished in 1965 for all but treason and piracy and even then had not been used since 1964. so he would have avoided that.

As for sentencing. I think murder can be as low as 14 years BUT 20-30 years is the norm before being considered parole.

As for mental health......well in the 80's the government shut most of the mental hospitals down. Due to that there is extremely few hospitals catered for such violent mental health patients so they just get dropped in our cat A prisons (like your supermax) or if you do get in one you end transferred to a normal prison if your viewed as "better".


Is there any kind of caveat for multiple offenses? I mean, sure he didn't kill this last victim, but the crime was similar to the first. I would think there would be something in the law there that would allow for "throwing away the key" if there was a second similar offense after being released.

If not, then I would say this case, specifically, should be used to try to push such a law.


I dont think due to the wonderful EU human rights courts we are apart of we can give life without parole.
But the courts could give him a ridiculously high minimum sentence of 50 odd years so the chances of him getting out will be nill.....if he gets a judge with common sense......and like you guys across the pond judges with common sense are a rarity here too.
edit on 2-6-2015 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 01:13 PM
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As hard as it is, I think that the duty of the prison service is to rehabilitate where this is possible. In only a very few circumstances should life mean "life".

The issue here is whether this person had demonstrated that he had reformed and was fit for release. I do think that if this was not forthcoming he should have remained locked up as a "public threat". sadly, I think human rights activists, lawyers and do-gooders may disagree.

I am opposed to capital punishment and laugh in the face of people who think guns would actually help!



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 01:15 PM
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originally posted by: paraphi
In only a very few circumstances should life mean "life".


Should should automatically include child rape and premeditated murder.



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 01:15 PM
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originally posted by: crazyewok

originally posted by: Vasa Croe

originally posted by: crazyewok
a reply to: Vasa Croe
Thanks


Capital punishment was abolished in 1965 for all but treason and piracy and even then had not been used since 1964. so he would have avoided that.

As for sentencing. I think murder can be as low as 14 years BUT 20-30 years is the norm before being considered parole.

As for mental health......well in the 80's the government shut most of the mental hospitals down. Due to that there is extremely few hospitals catered for such violent mental health patients so they just get dropped in our cat A prisons (like your supermax) or if you do get in one you end transferred to a normal prison if your viewed as "better".


Is there any kind of caveat for multiple offenses? I mean, sure he didn't kill this last victim, but the crime was similar to the first. I would think there would be something in the law there that would allow for "throwing away the key" if there was a second similar offense after being released.

If not, then I would say this case, specifically, should be used to try to push such a law.


I dont think due to the wonderful EU human rights courts we are apart of we can give life without parole.
But the courts could give him a ridiculously high minimum sentence of 50 odd years so the chances of him getting out will be nill.....if he gets a judge with common sense......and like you guys across the pond judges with common sense are a rarity here too.


Are the sentencing guildelines there able to do that 50 years without a parole hearing? If so, then it would seem that would be a life sentence.

Sucks guys like this can walk free to do it again.



posted on Jun, 2 2015 @ 01:18 PM
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a reply to: crazyewok

Something to chew over...

> UK tariffs

I think that where possible you should leave sentencing it up to the judge within the framework of the law.



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