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Picking up some activity on Cascadia- 5.8 Quake but...

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posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 09:20 AM
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Thanks Stosh! Im literally a stones throw from the water straight in from this activity in Oregon. We've got high hills within running distance and supplies at the ready ;-)

Gotta admit, I'm nervous.
a reply to: stosh64




posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 10:40 AM
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originally posted by: Cricketine
Thanks Stosh! Im literally a stones throw from the water straight in from this activity in Oregon. We've got high hills within running distance and supplies at the ready ;-)


Never underestimate the advantages of a small dirt bike for your situation. Hey, it worked for the kid in Deep Impact! Why run up a hill when you can power blast up it faster than anyone on foot?

So now we have a 5.8, a 5.5, a 4.4 and a 4.3. These don't make me as nervous for you as the last time when we had 6+'s on the De Fuca plate edges. I alarmed back then because the mags were close together and over 6.0- but yet no bigger quake happened. Yeah, this time only a .3 mag difference between the two bigger ones, but because of the below 6 mag, I have only a mild concern. I don't believe these to be foreshocks, but you never know. When it acts up, all you can do is be aware, prepared and ready to move quick if you're close to the ocean.



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 10:50 AM
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Everyone points at Cali, but Cascadia is the one that makes me nervous because no one looks that way.

Stay safe folks.



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 10:54 AM
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a reply to: TrueAmerican

when Cascadia goes, it's gonna go big time... ...and it's going to be ugly.



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 10:56 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Oh, they're watching it.

...and most geologists are scared to death, metaphorically speaking.

Cascadia is San Andres on steroids.



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 10:57 AM
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a reply to: seagull

Scientists might be, but the average person doesn't seem to think twice about it.



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 11:03 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

That's true.

Though not as true as it once was.

San Andreas gets the press, Cascadia is the 8000 megaton gorilla in the room.

That big ol' beast is damned scary. I'm hoping all these little quakes will lessen the pressure, and at least delay what is coming.



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 11:50 AM
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You can count on me for the blow by blow if the house starts a rockin'!

I'll say one thing...we are F%#*$& when it comes to services restored. Highway 101 is so unstable already with the regular shifting sands. They do repairs monthly on the same 20+ cracks on my commute route. And the bridges? They'd fall if a seagull farted on them.

Motor bike is an excellent idea, but my hubbs has the family 4x4 packed and ready to go with bug out supplies. Wishing I had a horse ;-)

a reply to: seagull



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 12:08 PM
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a reply to: stosh64

Cascades has a history that includes dormant periods as long as 980 years and as short as 210 years. Averaging about 300-600 years between quakes. The last was 1700 so we could theoretically be due or we could be 300 years away from the next quake.
Any discussion of cascades needs to include the exculpatory evidence as well as the condemning evidence to be fair. Otherwise people get all nervous and worried.



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 12:16 PM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: ketsuko

Oh, they're watching it.

...and most geologists are scared to death, metaphorically speaking.

Cascadia is San Andres on steroids.


Geologists give cascades a less that 15% chance of a 9.0 quake and less that 40% chance of a mag 8.0 or greater for its next thrust so scared to death is a bit of a stretch.



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 12:44 PM
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a reply to: AutumnWitch657

Oh, I know all that.

...and I know the odds are slim. But not none.

...now, I'm going to go back to my panic. No logic allowed.



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 01:15 PM
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Chew away...
Research shows Cascadia Subduction Zone reacts to tidal forces; ‘slow slip’ builds up pressure on fault
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The ultimate concern, of course, is the shallower portion of the fault, where plates can jolt past each other by 60 feet or more in what’s called a megathrust quake.

Japan’s 2011 Tohoku quake and tsunami was preceded — and likely triggered by — shallow, slow slip on an offshore fault.

There’s some evidence of similar slip before a recent quake off the coast of Chile.

There’s no proof yet that slow slip or tremor occur on the fault that caused Nepal’s weekend quake, but it wouldn’t be surprising, Creager said.

Houston and other researchers are closely tracking Northwest slow-slip events, looking for potential danger signs like more intense tremor or motion close to the locked zone.

“There is a possibility — but no guarantee — that there will be some enhanced tremor or slow slip prior to the (Cascadia) megathrust,” Houston said.

Researchers are even discussing whether they should issue warnings if such worrisome signs appear.

“Maybe we should tell people: We don’t quite know what this means, but we’re fairly certain the probability of an earthquake is bigger now,” Bürgmann said.

But 315 years have passed since the last time the Cascadia fault snapped in 1700.

Hundreds of slow-slip episodes — and countless tidal cycles — have played out since then without triggering a seismic cataclysm.

Last modified: April 28. 2015 6:42PM



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 01:21 PM
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I live on the Oregon coast, so far nothing.

I'm still alive.

*whew*



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 01:27 PM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: AutumnWitch657

Oh, I know all that.

...and I know the odds are slim. But not none.

...now, I'm going to go back to my panic. No logic allowed.


Oh sorry. My bad. Come on back east. Virginia is great and north Carolina takes most of the hurricanes for us. Less than ten inches of snow annually. 45° or warmer throughout the winter which still gives us fall color but not frostbite. Summer from May to late Sept. Indian summer throughout most of Oct and Nov and usually no killing frost till after second week in Dec.
The locals,list the seasons as Summer, still summer, Christmas and almost summer.



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 01:28 PM
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a reply to: AutumnWitch657

I'm likely, in the next couple of years, relocating to Tennessee. Not all that far away, relatively speaking.



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 01:41 PM
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Makes me nervous.
One of my 2015 predictions is for a major EQ in the pacific nw this year,
going through BC, SE AK, Wa, and Oregon,
and this doesn't help to ease my own worry.



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 03:27 PM
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earthquake.usgs.gov...



M6.0 - Off the coast of Oregon



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 03:31 PM
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My cats are nuts today! Even the fat lazy one!

I STILL didn't feel anything.

a reply to: dreamfox1



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 03:40 PM
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a reply to: Cricketine

I'd trust the cats. Just make sure the atmospherics aren't changing which could be bothering them too. Mine are crazy good barometers. I'd also watch the rest of your wildlife for weird behavior.


edit on 1-6-2015 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 03:53 PM
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I jumped into this thread because I'm in Washington - so "Cascadia - 5.8" quake caught my attention. This is off the coast of Oregon though, so it shouldn't get me too worried about my area... but I'm a huge fan of Seaside and Cannon Beach in Oregon. I hope this ends up just being a couple of burps and not a big one.

Too lazy to look now, but I thought I read somewhere that if Cascadia really decided to let go it might be like a zipper going all the way from the Northern California coast to the Washington coast and maybe even up to Southern Alaska? Is that correct?
edit on 1-6-2015 by tallcool1 because: spelling



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