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F-35 completes OT-1

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posted on May, 30 2015 @ 05:56 PM
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Six F-35Bs have left the USS Wasp after completing their first round of operational tests, leading up to IOC this July. Testing including 108 sorties (85.5 flying hours), and an engine delivery on a V-22 Osprey. All ten pilots were certified for daytime carrier operations, and three were certified for night operations.

Testing now goes to land based operations, with flights carrying ordnance for all the profiles the aircraft should be certified for once it reaches IOC. It will conclude with an ORI that will grant IOC to the first squadron of 10 aircraft. One of the aircraft is still being modified after finding problems during testing, and is running behind, but the squadron itself appears on track.


Six US Marine Corps F-35B Joint Strike Fighters have departed the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp following a one-and-a-half-week trial that included 108 test sorties and an F135 engine delivery from a V-22 Osprey as the first combat fighter squadron stationed in Yuma, Arizona, prepares to declare initial operational capability this July.

According to deputy commandant for Marine Corps aviation Lt Gen Jon Davis, each of the 10 F-35 pilots involved are now qualified for daytime carrier operations and another three have received their night-time flying qualifications.

The six aircraft have accumulated 85.5 hours of flight time collectively since arriving on the USS Wasp May 18. Two squadrons participated: Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron-501 of Beaufort, South Carolina, and Marine Fighter Attack Squadron-121 from the Air Station Yuma

www.flightglobal.com...




posted on May, 30 2015 @ 06:13 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Is this what you are talking about?


I know that the Harrier cracked the concrete. But how does this go around that problem?


edit on KSat, 30 May 2015 18:16:53 -0500pm3120155340 by Kratos40 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 07:24 PM
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Damnit, such a beautiful machine!
Nice to hear they´re going operational more and more now



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 09:05 PM
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Best news ever...



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 09:50 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58

Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron-501 of Beaufort, South Carolina




Pretty interesting things to see there watching the skies.



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 10:44 PM
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a reply to: Seamrog

The UK is going to train their first pilots there once they start standing their squadrons up. Then once they have a training cadre up they'll move to England to train.



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 10:56 PM
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Theoretically, if we found ourselves at war and NEEDED a ton more F-35's, how fast could we pump them out? Are these like bespoke suits and Roll Royce's that are each individually hand-built and take a lot of intensive time?



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 11:04 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Seamrog

The UK is going to train their first pilots there once they start standing their squadrons up. Then once they have a training cadre up they'll move to England to train.


They have been there for some time - at least a year I know. UK is not the only non-Americans there.



posted on May, 31 2015 @ 12:37 AM
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a reply to: Seamrog

No, but most of the others are going to shift to other locations. The UK plans to be there doing basic pilot training until almost 2020 or so.



posted on May, 31 2015 @ 11:14 PM
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I read about this on breaking defence.
Everyone in the force seems very happy with the craft thus far. They are reporting turn overs much faster than the older harriers.

It seems like the biggest issue so far mentioned is the noise this beast makes. If that is the biggest issue so far i think the f-35 a,b and c will be much better than the critics claimed.

I recall lots of critics making claims about the f-22 before it went into operation. Now they say we should have scrapped the f-35 and built more of the f-22's.

I hear talk of using certifying the f-35 for the b61-12.

Can anyone comment further on the likelihood of such certification. I think the f-35 will be everything it was supposed to be, in time.



posted on Jun, 3 2015 @ 08:49 AM
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originally posted by: AlphaStrike1001


It seems like the biggest issue so far mentioned is the noise this beast makes.





It is definitely louder than the Hornet.

Saw one coming in over the weekend - looks like a mallard touching down.



posted on Jun, 3 2015 @ 09:06 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Thanks for keeping us informed on the progress.. If "Things" keep ramping up in the S. China Sea or the Ukraine we may need something like those puppies.



posted on Jun, 6 2015 @ 10:43 AM
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Awesome video showing detailed carrier ops.



Bonus F-35 weather testing in Florida:




posted on Jun, 6 2015 @ 11:07 AM
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didn't they say that lighting will bring this puppy down? so if it's storming, it is a no go on flight....great, so the enemy just waits until it storms.



posted on Jun, 6 2015 @ 11:17 AM
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a reply to: jimmyx

The F-35 is an "All Weather" fighter, meaning it can fly, operate and perform it's mission in all weather when it reaches FOC.
edit on 6-6-2015 by Sammamishman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2015 @ 05:09 PM
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a reply to: jimmyx

At one point, yes. It's come a long way, and is moving along through development nicely at this point though, and won't have any problems with any weather once it reaches operational.



posted on Jun, 6 2015 @ 06:17 PM
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I'm still not sold on it.

Short legs.

It tries to do too many things.

But I guess time will tell.



posted on Jun, 6 2015 @ 07:13 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: jimmyx

At one point, yes. It's come a long way, and is moving along through development nicely at this point though, and won't have any problems with any weather once it reaches operational.


Well a direct hit with a lightning bolt will cripple any aircraft somewhat right zap?



posted on Jun, 6 2015 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: yuppa

It depends on the lightning bolt. There are bolts that have brought down large aircraft, and bolts that they barely even notice.



posted on Jun, 6 2015 @ 07:46 PM
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a reply to: seagull

Not as short as you think. The A combat radius on internal fuel alone falls between a Hornet (which is no surprise since everything has longer legs), and the Viper. The C is a little better since it's bigger and has a better internal fuel capacity. The B is closer to a Hornet though, because they lose the forward body fuel tank to the lift fan.







 
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