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Biblical Plunder

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posted on May, 31 2015 @ 10:10 PM
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a reply to: windword

Also, they didn't forsake the world of work.


Josephus tells us they practise husbandry but Philo enlarges saying they are farmers, shepherds, cowherds, beekeepers, artisans and craftsmen, but they did not make weapons, would not engage in commerce and were no sailors. They rejected slavery, believing brotherhood to be the natural relationship of men but that it had been spoiled by covetousness. Though they read a great deal they were not interested in philosophy in general but only morals. They ignored the weather and never used it as an excuse not to work. They returned from work rejoicing, as if they had been partying all day.

I think that the main differences between accounts is due to when they were known by the writers. Philo would have known of them long before the rebellion against Rome. Josephus had an overlap view, before and after the rebellion.

Plus, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Masada, etc. were during the 2nd revolt 135 ish. War tends to change people.




posted on May, 31 2015 @ 10:20 PM
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a reply to: pthena




Also, they didn't forsake the world of work.


Good point and excellent segue!



Plus, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Masada, etc. were during the 2nd revolt 135 ish. War tends to change people.


Indeed. So does power.



posted on May, 31 2015 @ 10:29 PM
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a reply to: Akragon



except maybe St.Christopher...

So I read the St. Christopher story and found out it's possibly based in part on the Jason myths, involving the Goddess Hera, and even Jason was brought up by Chiron and Chiron is my personal Christ archetype.

So there!

edit on 31-5-2015 by pthena because: (no reason given)



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