It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Humans Trekked Out of Africa Via Egypt, Study Suggests

page: 2
10
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 10:29 AM
link   
a reply to: punkinworks10

And I honestly did forget which is odd because I was thinking to myself while typing sat night how odd it was that they were only on one side of Gibraltar. That's what happens when you focus all your energy on Levantine Neanderthal I guess!

The interesting thing about the cave where the potential last Neanderthals were found is the sheer magnitude of occupation. Everything from Mousterian to magdalenian to Solutrean to Carthaginian. I don't know why I was thinking this site was across the strait but I'm always happy to stand corrected.

If anyone else is interested- archaeology.about.com...




posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 10:57 AM
link   

originally posted by: peter vlar
a reply to: punkinworks10

And I honestly did forget which is odd because I was thinking to myself while typing sat night how odd it was that they were only on one side of Gibraltar. That's what happens when you focus all your energy on Levantine Neanderthal I guess!

The interesting thing about the cave where the potential last Neanderthals were found is the sheer magnitude of occupation. Everything from Mousterian to magdalenian to Solutrean to Carthaginian. I don't know why I was thinking this site was across the strait but I'm always happy to stand corrected.

If anyone else is interested- archaeology.about.com...

Great info sharing guys Im learning alot.



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 11:06 AM
link   

originally posted by: peter vlar
a reply to: punkinworks10

And I honestly did forget which is odd because I was thinking to myself while typing sat night how odd it was that they were only on one side of Gibraltar. That's what happens when you focus all your energy on Levantine Neanderthal I guess!

The interesting thing about the cave where the potential last Neanderthals were found is the sheer magnitude of occupation. Everything from Mousterian to magdalenian to Solutrean to Carthaginian. I don't know why I was thinking this site was across the strait but I'm always happy to stand corrected.

If anyone else is interested- archaeology.about.com...


Peter,
Here is alink to Clive Finlayson's Blog on his dig at Gorham's cave.

www.abovetopsecret.com...





We've just started our summer excavation season here in Gibraltar. In June we will be excavating Vanguard Cave. This cave was occupied by the Neanderthals. We're not sure for how long just yet - that's part of the reason why we're excavating here. Vanguard Cave lies just at the entrance to the Mediterranean Sea, at the base of a 426-metre (1492 ft) cliff. Logistics are a problem and sometimes it is easier to transport heavy kit by boat than bringing it down the cliffs. Today we had to set up a sieving station and we had to get two 100-kg containers onto the site. These were brought by boat but the rocky shore prevented the boat from getting in too close.[/ex ]http://clivehumanevo.blogspot.com/2013/06/i-have-decided-to-start-this-blog-so-as.html?m=1


Gorhams Cave
edit on 9-6-2015 by punkinworks10 because: (no reason given)

edit on 9-6-2015 by punkinworks10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 11:14 AM
link   
Hominids were outside Africa for millions of years. The real answer is genetic diffusion.
Also there are two branches of modern hominids that developed outside of Africa that had different neolithic technologies that are at least 750,000 years old. So, my guess, is the experts are just focusing on a popular and superficial argument that supports a currently accepted theory that will be refined much more in the future.
a reply to: Spider879



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 11:18 AM
link   
a reply to: punkinworks10

Wow...some really awesome pictures there. Thanks for posting that!



posted on Jun, 9 2015 @ 11:45 AM
link   
a reply to: peter vlar
Most welcome Peter,
When I mentioned morrocan HSN I was actually refering to at site high in the mountains, and asnother that is in Tunisia(i think).
I will see if I can dig those articles up again, a couple of sites that have yielded HSN sites with tools, moustrian, and the around 80-100k years ago AMH shows up but the tools stame the same.



posted on Jun, 10 2015 @ 08:31 AM
link   
a reply to: Spider879

Spider,
This was posted on Dienekes blog

Nilo-Saharan component
Scientific Reports 5, Article number: 9996 doi:10.1038/srep09996

The genetics of East African populations: a Nilo-Saharan component in the African genetic landscape

Begoña Dobon et al.

East Africa is a strategic region to study human genetic diversity due to the presence of ethnically, linguistically, and geographically diverse populations. Here, we provide new insight into the genetic history of populations living in the Sudanese region of East Africa by analysing nine ethnic groups belonging to three African linguistic families: Niger-Kordofanian, Nilo-Saharan and Afro-Asiatic. A total of 500 individuals were genotyped for 200,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Principal component analysis, clustering analysis using ADMIXTURE, FST statistics, and the three-population test were used to investigate the underlying genetic structure and ancestry of the different ethno-linguistic groups. Our analyses revealed a genetic component for Sudanese Nilo-Saharan speaking groups (Darfurians and part of Nuba populations) related to Nilotes of South Sudan, but not to other Sudanese populations or other sub-Saharan populations. Populations inhabiting the North of the region showed close genetic affinities with North Africa, with a component that could be remnant of North Africans before the migrations of Arabs from Arabia. In addition, we found very low genetic distances between populations in genes important for anti-malarial and anti-bacterial host defence, suggesting similar selective pressures on these genes and stressing the importance of considering functional pathways to understand the evolutionary history of populations.


Nilo Saharan Component

It illuminates the subject at hand a little.



new topics




 
10
<< 1   >>

log in

join