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Dawn sends new closer pics of Ceres

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posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 06:18 AM
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a reply to: samkent

I can understand thinking that, sometimes they all do seem to start to look alike in many ways. But they are also so different too.

Ceres is round....Vesta not so much:



Some places have some really unique features that really stand out like this:



Or this:



Sometimes the coloring and contrasts of the surfaces are very interesting to look at, like this:



Or this:



Other times the way the craters themselves look are enough to make my jaw drop:



And then when I start to think that they all are looking alike, I think of Pluto....boy is it strange looking:



So I can understand why in a lot of pictures many start to look alike, but in fact, most of these worlds are rather unique looking.




posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 05:19 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful
You're right, although most of the objects you mentioned are icy rather than rocky. Icy bodies have a huge variety between themselves, rocky bodies not so much.

But the beauty is in specifics, i.e. the chemical composition, geology, morphology, and other such sciency words. For example, the Moon is basically a huge chunk of Earth's crust that (hypothetically) got blown off by an impact with Theia, whereas Vesta is an example of a primeval planetoid that never got to "grow" to a full planet. Some asteroids reportedly contain more gold or other rare elements than the whole of Earth.
edit on 20-11-2015 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 07:30 PM
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new picture from new orbit!

gosh, people, did you all forget about this? =,(

www.jpl.nasa.gov...



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 08:53 PM
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With all the resources on these, what makes you think others do not want them too? I think it makes perfect sense that aliens have got there first and are mining these resources. Of course, you probably dont see any evidence for that...



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 03:57 AM
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originally posted by: egidio88
gosh, people, did you all forget about this? =,(

We didn't, seeing as we've been posting in this thread in the last few weeks.

New images are being posted almost every day: photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov...
with an in-depth discussion and further work on the images at the Unmanned Spaceflight Forum.

But people's attention is a fickle thing, and tends to go after flashy headlines (like that "dome" on Mars) rather than after an ongoing science mission.



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 12:56 PM
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Wow, they are already giving much more without waiting for the probe to fly by again over the spot:

1) dawn.jpl.nasa.gov...

2) 3D model: www.jpl.nasa.gov...

3) new perspective: www.jpl.nasa.gov...

"A group of scientists from NASA's Dawn mission suggests that when sunlight reaches Ceres' Occator Crater, a kind of thin haze of dust and evaporating water forms there. This haze only becomes dense enough to be seen by looking at it laterally, as in this image, the scientists wrote in the journal Nature in December 2015."

LOL, personally I don't think it's a haze at all =/



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 10:53 PM
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a reply to: egidio88

And with the images, comes a new insight into the possible nature of the bright spot: www.jpl.nasa.gov...


In one study, scientists identify this bright material as a kind of salt. [...] Study authors, led by Andreas Nathues at Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Göttingen, Germany, write that the bright material is consistent with a type of magnesium sulfate called hexahydrite. A different type of magnesium sulfate is familiar on Earth as Epsom salt.

Nathues and colleagues, using images from Dawn's framing camera, suggest that these salt-rich areas were left behind when water-ice sublimated in the past. Impacts from asteroids would have unearthed the mixture of ice and salt, they say.

"The global nature of Ceres' bright spots suggests that this world has a subsurface layer that contains briny water-ice," Nathues said.


Here's what hexahydrite looks like: www.mindat.org...
edit on 9-12-2015 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 04:50 AM
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But the bright spots would not remain just as bright even when the surrounding region is in shadow, if the brightness was caused by light reflecting off a white material like magnesium sulphate.

It is not enough to provide a possible reason for the surface of Ceres in some places looking brilliantly white when the sun is above the horizon. One must also explain why these bright spots persist when the sun is below the horizon. The latest speculation from NASA fails to do this because even very white material does not remain brilliantly white in pitch darkness - which is what photos indicate.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 10:42 AM
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originally posted by: micpsi
But the bright spots would not remain just as bright even when the surrounding region is in shadow, if the brightness was caused by light reflecting off a white material like magnesium sulphate.

It is not enough to provide a possible reason for the surface of Ceres in some places looking brilliantly white when the sun is above the horizon. One must also explain why these bright spots persist when the sun is below the horizon. The latest speculation from NASA fails to do this because even very white material does not remain brilliantly white in pitch darkness - which is what photos indicate.

Care to share some photos that indicate that. The bright spots are invisible when they are on the night-side of Ceres.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 11:31 AM
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I'm surprised we haven't seen a much shorter exposure so that we can see unsaturated details within the area.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 12:16 PM
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It seems reasonable that water vapor escaping from beneath Ceres' surface, and then subliming, could carry fine dust aloft with it. This could reflect light, even when lower elevation features, on the surface, were deprived of sunlight.

Such dust would apparently be most conspicuous when viewed at a low angle, as when it's near the horizon. One would then be looking through a much thicker layer of it.

This dust is probably the same sort of substance that creates the permanent bright spots. As noted in a previous post, they are now tentatively classifying this as a kind of salt, one containing magnesium and sulfur.
edit on 10-12-2015 by Ross 54 because: improved paragraph structure.

edit on 10-12-2015 by Ross 54 because: improved paragraph structure.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: Saint Exupery
I'm surprised we haven't seen a much shorter exposure so that we can see unsaturated details within the area.

We kinda did, although you're probably waiting for more detailed and more underexposed images.




posted on Dec, 22 2015 @ 03:20 PM
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BREAKING: FINAL ORBIT! 300KM!!!

GUYS! 6 PICTURES TODAY INSTEAD OF THE USUAL DAILY ONE! AND DIFFERENT ANGLES, TOO + NEW FINAL LOWEST ORBIT!!! STUNNING!

dawn.jpl.nasa.gov...
edit on 22-12-2015 by egidio88 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 22 2015 @ 08:58 PM
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a reply to: egidio88

Woooooow! I don't think I've seen a more cratered surface before.



posted on Jan, 13 2016 @ 04:29 AM
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Now, that's what I call a closeup! Wow!


Full-size: photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov...


This image from NASA's Dawn spacecraft shows Kupalo Crater, one of the youngest craters on Ceres. The crater has bright material exposed on its rim and walls, which could be salts. Its flat floor likely formed from impact melt and debris.

Kupalo, which measures 16 miles (26 kilometers) across and is located at southern mid-latitudes, is named for the Slavic god of vegetation and harvest.

www.jpl.nasa.gov...



posted on Jan, 21 2016 @ 11:50 PM
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The Kupalo crater looks great in these 3D renderings: imgbox.com...



Kudos to people at the Unmanned Space Flight forum for their work on such space images.


Can't wait to see Ceres closeup images in colour, if that's at all going to be possible.



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