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This is being called a Nuke! Can someone identify this weapon? Yemen Conflict.

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posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:01 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: johnwick

Not to mention there's almost no way in hell to tell it was Israeli after they were shot down unless they came down intact, and if that happened the media in the ME would have this plastered all over.


Everyone knows it is always isreal fault when anything happens in the ME.

There is no other explanation.

There were f-16 jets, nobody can have those but the US or Israelis......

I just get so tired of this bs all the time.

Basically every US Allie at this point has at least a few F-16s.

Why do they automatically assume it was isreal?




posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:01 PM
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Its pretty simple to tell if its a nuke or not, does it has a white flash at the start? nukes generate all king of radiation, x rays gamma rays, this makes the flash at the start, conventional explosives do not have this side effect so no flash

ETA: you don't see x rays, the flash is actually air around the blast absorbing the rays and heating up millions of degrees
edit on 27-5-2015 by Indigent because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:02 PM
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originally posted by: jadedANDcynical
a reply to: bharata

In short, no:



Nuclear, Biological, And Chemical Warfare


Blast produces an intense shock wave and high winds that create flying debris. It may collapse shelters and some fighting positions.

Thermal radiation causes burns and starts fires. The bright flash at the time of the explosion can cause a temporary loss of vision or permanent eye damage if you look at the explosion, especially at night.

Nuclear radiation can cause casualties and delay movements. It may last for days and cover large areas of terrain. It occurs in two stages: initial and residual.

Initial radiation is emitted directly from the fireball in the first minute after the explosion. It travels at the speed of light along straight lines and has high penetrating power.
Residual radiation lingers after the first minute. It comes from the radioactive material originally in a nuclear weapon or from material, such as soil and equipment, made radioactive by the nuclear explosion.

EMP is a massive surge of electrical power. It is created the instant a nuclear detonation occurs and is transmitted at the speed of light in all directions. It can damage solid-state components of electrical equipment (radios, radars, computers, vehicles) and weapon systems (TOW and Dragon). Equipment can be protected by disconnecting it from its power source and placing it in or behind some type of shielding material (armored vehicle or dirt wall) out of the line of sight to the burst. If no warning is received prior to a detonation, there is no effective means of protecting operating equipment.




Think it could just be a no name brand style nuke lol like what ISIS would make a dirty bomb to be if they didnt blow up half the islamic state in the process?



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:05 PM
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a reply to: bharata

Lol


That isnt a nuke.... if that guy was filming a nuke from that close .... there would be no more video!



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:08 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: johnwick

I'm leaning towards a large bunker buster. Maybe 1,000 pounds.


That seems one of the most likely causes, judging by the video evidence.

1,000 lbs.....wow!!!

Crowd pleasers for sure, those things are monsters.

I have never witnessed bigger than a 155 mm artillery round IRL, and that was pretty damned impressive.

Can't imagine seeing a big dog like that.

I have just heard the stories from others.



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:10 PM
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originally posted by: theghostfaceentity

originally posted by: jadedANDcynical
a reply to: bharata

In short, no:



Nuclear, Biological, And Chemical Warfare


Blast produces an intense shock wave and high winds that create flying debris. It may collapse shelters and some fighting positions.

Thermal radiation causes burns and starts fires. The bright flash at the time of the explosion can cause a temporary loss of vision or permanent eye damage if you look at the explosion, especially at night.

Nuclear radiation can cause casualties and delay movements. It may last for days and cover large areas of terrain. It occurs in two stages: initial and residual.

Initial radiation is emitted directly from the fireball in the first minute after the explosion. It travels at the speed of light along straight lines and has high penetrating power.
Residual radiation lingers after the first minute. It comes from the radioactive material originally in a nuclear weapon or from material, such as soil and equipment, made radioactive by the nuclear explosion.

EMP is a massive surge of electrical power. It is created the instant a nuclear detonation occurs and is transmitted at the speed of light in all directions. It can damage solid-state components of electrical equipment (radios, radars, computers, vehicles) and weapon systems (TOW and Dragon). Equipment can be protected by disconnecting it from its power source and placing it in or behind some type of shielding material (armored vehicle or dirt wall) out of the line of sight to the burst. If no warning is received prior to a detonation, there is no effective means of protecting operating equipment.




Think it could just be a no name brand style nuke lol like what ISIS would make a dirty bomb to be if they didnt blow up half the islamic state in the process?


No.

Not even close.



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:11 PM
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a reply to: InverseLookingGlass

It was a fuel air explosive.




posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:15 PM
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a reply to: bharata

Evidently, it wasn't an EMP weapon.
The camera continued working.



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:15 PM
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a reply to: johnwick

A good buddy of mine saw a Blu-82 drop in Afghanistan. Said there was never a truer use of the term "glad it's on our side" than that.



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:16 PM
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a reply to: johnwick

They're not so bad donating underground. It's the ones that aren't bunker busters that really ruin your day.



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:17 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Here is a 2000 pound bunker buster.



Now if it hit an ammo dump or the target was something highly explosive then that could explain it.

Here is a different strike. Fast forward to 0:43.



It could be just a new large conventional weapon. Still very large compared to the 2000 pound strike.



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:18 PM
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a reply to: johnwick

Here is what 2300 tons of ammonium nitrate will get you:


The morning of 16 April 1947 dawned clear and crisp, cooled by a brisk north wind. Just before 8:00 A.M., longshoremen removed the hatch covers on Hold 4 of the French Liberty ship Grandcamp as they prepared to load the remainder of a consignment of ammonium nitrate fertilizer. Some 2,300 tons were already onboard, 880 of which were in the lower part of Hold 4. The remainder of the ship's cargo consisted of large balls of sisal twine, peanuts, drilling equipment, tobacco, cotton, and a few cases of small ammunition. No special safety precautions were in focus at the time.







posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:19 PM
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originally posted by: Shamrock6
a reply to: johnwick

A good buddy of mine saw a Blu-82 drop in Afghanistan. Said there was never a truer use of the term "glad it's on our side" than that.


Damn!!!!

I saw a video from Vietnam of one "clearing a heli pad" in the jungle....it was awe inspiring!!!

To see one IRL, "glad its on our side" is at least one of the first thoughts I would have, after checking my pants that is.



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:20 PM
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a reply to: bharata

They're going to be targeting areas such as ammunition dumps. There's almost no way to tell exactly what weapon was used, other than it definitely not being a nuclear weapon.



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:20 PM
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a reply to: Greathouse

Apparently the strike was four to five kilometres away. The fuel air explosive in the video you posted is impressive but is still not as large.



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:22 PM
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originally posted by: bharata
a reply to: Greathouse

Apparently the strike was four to five kilometres away. The fuel air explosive in the video you posted is impressive but is still not as large.



Ok


How about this one?




By the way fuel air explosive can yield up to 1 kt of blast equivalent. For years they were called the poor man's nuclear weapon.
edit on 27-5-2015 by Greathouse because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:24 PM
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originally posted by: jadedANDcynical
a reply to: johnwick

Here is what 2300 tons of ammonium nitrate will get you:


The morning of 16 April 1947 dawned clear and crisp, cooled by a brisk north wind. Just before 8:00 A.M., longshoremen removed the hatch covers on Hold 4 of the French Liberty ship Grandcamp as they prepared to load the remainder of a consignment of ammonium nitrate fertilizer. Some 2,300 tons were already onboard, 880 of which were in the lower part of Hold 4. The remainder of the ship's cargo consisted of large balls of sisal twine, peanuts, drilling equipment, tobacco, cotton, and a few cases of small ammunition. No special safety precautions were in focus at the time.






I saw a show about this, most don't know it was the worst industrial disaster in US history.

It wiped out an entire town.

Just imagine the power involved in that.

Thanks for sharing, watching the vids now, the destruction is mind blowing.



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:26 PM
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a reply to: bharata

Five kilometers is three miles. A ten kiloton nuclear detonation, which is on the small end, would have fires and blast damage at a mile. At 3/4ths of a mile anyone who witnessed the blast would die from radiation and blast effects, as well as being a fire storm, and major damage to any building in the area. There is no evidence of any of that after the detonation.

Even a one kiloton blast would do damage out to over a half kilometer.
edit on 5/27/2015 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:26 PM
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a reply to: johnwick

Yep, my grandpa was on the first ship to explode, the Grandcamp. He was last seen carrying a fire hose up the gangplank sometime before the detonation took place.

It was measured on a seismometer in Denver and knocked a couple of airplanes out of the sky.

There were hunks of metal found many many miles away.



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:26 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: bharata

They're going to be targeting areas such as ammunition dumps. There's almost no way to tell exactly what weapon was used, other than it definitely not being a nuclear weapon.


I agree, it could have been an ammo dump and some idiot was smoking in the wrong place.

All we have is a video of the explosion.

Could have just been a lucky bullet hit in the right spot, we have no way if actually knowing with the evidence we have.



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