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#WWJVD: Amnesty for Pot Convicts

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posted on May, 27 2015 @ 03:14 PM
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This week on Off the Grid, I discuss why pot convicts should be granted amnesty. Tune in to this all new segment of #WWJVD to find out just how many people have been locked up for marijuana related incidents. The numbers are outrageous.

Do you agree with what I have to say?




posted on May, 27 2015 @ 03:16 PM
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a reply to: JesseVentura

Damn right! Amnesty for pot convicts! I agree 100%. That's the least we can do for illegally jailing people for having a plant in their possession (yes the drug war is illegal, keep in mind Congress had to create an Amendment to make alcohol illegal).
edit on 27-5-2015 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 03:18 PM
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I agree.

I know some good people that have had their lives ruined because of this, although I don't condone substance abuse, it ruins lives also.
edit on 033131p://bWednesday2015 by Stormdancer777 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 03:18 PM
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How bout some reparations ?



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 03:31 PM
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Laws against pot have damaged too many lives....Govt can never undo the horror of trials, probation, jail, counseling and inability to join military, etc that goes along with a pot conviction. The least U.S. can and should do is give amnesty to those who were caught up in the reefer madness fiasco.



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 03:46 PM
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I agree, 100% amnesty and legalization nationally. Legalization will be slow because of the right wing religious groups in the USA.

With almost 30% of drug convictions being MJ related involving a prison sentence, just think of how much states could save through releasing those prisoners. It takes over $40K per year to feed, house and educate a US prisoner.



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 03:48 PM
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Amnesty for convicts would almost ensure a row of lawsuits against the state. That's probably akin to asking the FBI to stop setting up patsies.

But I'd agree with that and while they're at it, how about a genuine independent investigation into whether there were any illegal activities leading up to the classification. If so and don't fall within statue of limitations than any parties or companies since they are considered people should face charges. Why not right?
edit on 27-5-2015 by Rosinitiate because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 03:53 PM
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originally posted by: eManym
I agree, 100% amnesty and legalization nationally. Legalization will be slow because of the right wing religious groups in the USA.


Male cow feces. Legalization will be slow because there is too much money to be made. Let me list them.
Police Unions
Jail Guard Unions
Illegal Dope Dealers
The Prison Industry
States, Counties and Municipalities (too much fine money)
Local, State and Federal Government Employee Unions.

In the early 80's we shared a hangar with a DEA unit. One night over a few beers one of their senior people said something that I consider the truth of why there is a drug war. He said "There is too much money to be made in selling drugs and there is too much money to be made in fighting drugs and both sides make campaign contributions."



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 03:59 PM
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I also believe in full amnesty and legalization. Ros almost hit on a topic of concern in his above post.


I wonder how many asset seizure's would be challenged if amnesty was granted? That's a big chunk of money to the federal government state and local law enforcement that they might have to pay back.

But I Think most voters would approve of no retaliation in a amendment in order to right something that is inherently wrong.
edit on 27-5-2015 by Greathouse because: (no reason given)


(post by theghostfaceentity removed for a serious terms and conditions violation)

posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:39 PM
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Will never happen because that would mean prisons lose money.
Sure hope it does and I hope Obama does something about it.



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 04:46 PM
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a reply to: JIMC5499




"There is too much money to be made in selling drugs and there is too much money to be made in fighting drugs and both sides make campaign contributions."


Funny enough, I have the same story kind of along the same lines and over a discussion with beer. It wasn't the DEA but a high level executive over a company that sells the locks to the US prisons.

He pretty much said the same thing, that there is to much money to be made by keeping people locked up and their is too much lobbying to ensure that drugs aren't decriminilized.



posted on May, 27 2015 @ 06:23 PM
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originally posted by: Lysergic
How bout some reparations ?


reparations will be made when those people are allowed to kick back on their front porch and enjoy a smoke in the sun without fear of the law.
edit on 27-5-2015 by TzarChasm because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 09:33 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: JesseVentura

Damn right! Amnesty for pot convicts! I agree 100%. That's the least we can do for illegally jailing people for having a plant in their possession (yes the drug war is illegal, keep in mind Congress had to create an Amendment to make alcohol illegal).

I think I disagree (note the word THINK). That may sound strange coming from someone who grew up with pot and who partakes once-in-a-blue-moon. But...even if it was 100% legal today even for recreational use and even if it were legal for underage people...in other words...legal for everyone anytime, anywhere...they still broke the law at the time. Just because that law changes, aren't they being punished for breaking the law, not specifically for the deed?

So while I'm not really arguing the point everyone else may be, I'm curious about that idea and everyone's opinion. If a person breaks a law and gets five years in prison, are they paying for breaking the law or are they paying for the act they committed? If it is breaking the law...then I would say amnesty is wrong.
edit on 5/29/2015 by WeAreAWAKE because: a space makes a big difference



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 09:35 AM
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a reply to: WeAreAWAKE

We are required to disobey unjust laws. Why should you be continued to be punished for a law that was unjust and later repealed?



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 09:35 AM
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originally posted by: boymonkey74
Will never happen because that would mean prisons lose money.
Sure hope it does and I hope Obama does something about it.

Well if Obama DID do it...at least we would know it is the wrong decision



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 09:38 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: WeAreAWAKE

We are required to disobey unjust laws. Why should you be continued to be punished for a law that was unjust and later repealed?

I understand your point...but I'm still curious about the question. When sent to prison, are you there for breaking a law? If so, I believe logic dictates that even if the act's legality is changed, you still broke a law. And I'll even add to that...and please keep in mind I'm not arguing, just exploring the idea...if someone breaks the law but for an extremely good reason then, should they be punished for breaking the law? What if I killed someone who the vast majority (or even everyone) agreed should be killed? Should I go to prison for breaking the law?



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 09:42 AM
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a reply to: WeAreAWAKE

Well since murder is a crime that is inarguably a just one, the onus of that decision lies on the opinion of the jury at your trial.

See the problem with the situation is how we view prisons. We view prisons as a place to lock people away from society for a while. We SHOULD be looking at prisons as a means to rehabilitate them and help them integrate better with society. There is no reason a murderer or rapist should be sharing a cell with a pot dealer for instance.

If prisons were primarily rehabilitation centers instead of just time out centers then this conversation wouldn't even exist. Once marijuana is legalized, there would be no more point to rehabilitating someone in jail for it. So they'd naturally need to be released.



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 09:53 AM
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There will never be amnesty for MJ offences and there will never be widespread legalization because the Christian Right Wing politicians are taking over the government soon and they don't want anyone to have any fun.

Jeb will do exactly what his Conservative controllers tell him to do.


edit on 29-5-2015 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 10:31 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: WeAreAWAKE

Well since murder is a crime that is inarguably a just one, the onus of that decision lies on the opinion of the jury at your trial.

See the problem with the situation is how we view prisons. We view prisons as a place to lock people away from society for a while. We SHOULD be looking at prisons as a means to rehabilitate them and help them integrate better with society. There is no reason a murderer or rapist should be sharing a cell with a pot dealer for instance.

If prisons were primarily rehabilitation centers instead of just time out centers then this conversation wouldn't even exist. Once marijuana is legalized, there would be no more point to rehabilitating someone in jail for it. So they'd naturally need to be released.

But we both know they are not rehabilitation centers. If anything...they promote future illegal activity. They are "Time Out Centers" (I quote cause I like your wording) or revenge centers. So with that...I would have to stick with the idea that the punishment (prison) is for breaking a law not the act contained within the law.

Regardless...I say legalize pot for everyone over legal age and be done with it. Its a hell of a lot better than alcohol. But I think that the people paying for breaking the current laws should finish their time. Or maybe a reduced time. But I feel the same about illegal aliens. They broke the law coming here...they should at least be sent back to follow the legal process. But that is another thread.



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