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Never had any family/friends who knew about cars, but I want to learn!

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posted on May, 25 2015 @ 07:38 PM
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the first time it is cold outside and you are wailing on a wrench and you slip and bust them knuckles, you will figure out pretty quick if you want to be dealing with that.
a reply to: Mugly
My first winter in Oklahoma, i had to replace a frozen and blown out water pump in a '93 Cavalier after an ice storm. It was a painful experience, but one i wouldn't trade. That was when i learned about proper ratios of antifreeze/water




posted on May, 25 2015 @ 07:54 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147

The only place for you to head is for an "oldie" from the pre-computer days. So a old 'Vette would would be a nice choice. I've always been a Chevy guy, and just a few years back I bought a basketcase '74 Vette and rebuilt it. I did not restore it per the strict rules. But that would be too much of a job or a novice. I would suggest that you look for an early Mustang. I hate Fords and Dodges, but I make an exception for the old pony cars. They are plentiful and cheaper by far than an old 'Vette in any shape.



posted on May, 25 2015 @ 08:30 PM
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I've been a mechanic for. 11 Years, that would def not be the car i learned on. I would recommend an early 90s honda that way you are learning some of the newer technology in cars at least and the parts and tools will be cheap. There is so much to learn its not even funny. The art of rusty bolts, the art of not cross threading bolts, the art of not over tightening bolts get a Chilton manual and TAKE YOUR TIME. Patience is gold with cars....pm me if u need help!



posted on May, 25 2015 @ 09:38 PM
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Get a chevy, the parts are cheap and are available almost anywhere. If you don`t want to into all the electronic engine sensors and gizmos then get a pre 1980 chevy. After about 1980 they started loading the engines up with all kinds of electronic sensors that will only complicate the learning process if you are just starting to learn the basics.
almost all of those sensors that they are putting on the engines are for emission control purposes they aren`t necessary to make the engine run engines ran just fine without the sensors.some of the sensors that they put on will stop the engine from running if the sensor stops working,so if you`re not comfortable or familiar with working with a ohm/volt meter than get a pre 1980 car.One of the most irritating things that they came up with is the security chip in the key, when the chip stops working you can`t start your car,you`ll be testing everything under the hood to find out why the car won`t start and never think about testing the key.
visit some online car repair forums they are loaded with info.I learned how to fix cars 30 years ago because I got tired of paying the outrageous repair fees only to get my car back to find out they didn`t fix the problem.
now a days they don`t teach mechanics how to diagnose a problem they tech them how to hook up a diagnostic machine to tell them what might be causing the problem.The mechanics fix what the machine tells them to fix without even checking to see if that is really what`s causing the problem.

here`s a humorous car related story.
last night my daughter was on here way to work and she got pulled over by the state police.The gave her a repair ticket for having a cracked windshield.Today she went to look at the windshield and it didn`t look like a crack so her boyfriend got some windex and cleaned the window and the "crack" miraculously disappeared, the window wasn`t cracked it was just dirty. I keep thinking how foolish the state trooper is going to feel when she takes the car and repair ticket to the state police barracks to have it inspected and she explains to him that there wasn`t any crack the window was just dirty.



posted on May, 25 2015 @ 09:54 PM
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originally posted by: Tardacus
One of the most irritating things that they came up with is the security chip in the key, when the chip stops working you can`t start your car,you`ll be testing everything under the hood to find out why the car won`t start and never think about testing the key.


now a days they don`t teach mechanics how to diagnose a problem they tech them how to hook up a diagnostic machine to tell them what might be causing the problem.The mechanics fix what the machine tells them to fix without even checking to see if that is really what`s causing the problem.

.


ive worked on thousands of cars and have never ran into the problem of a car no starting because of the key.

mechanics still do plenty of diagnostics without using a scanner.
if the check engine light is on then yeah, it gets hooked up to pull a code.
not everything throws a light and not every problem that needs to be diagnosed is even engine related.

diagnostics is not limited to the engine or electrical



posted on May, 25 2015 @ 10:08 PM
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originally posted by: Ghost147
a reply to: Gothmog

I really like the idea of working on something between the 1930's-50's, but how easy is it to find parts for something that old?

Thats when auto junkyards and research comes in. A lot of times parts from one will fit another



posted on May, 26 2015 @ 12:19 AM
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Start watching Top Gear BBC

imo, right now a used TT Coupe offers a lot for the money.



posted on May, 26 2015 @ 03:03 AM
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Before you tackle the heartache of Corvette ownership start small, before you have a Vette you need a garage to store it in for starters. In Canada you`ll be lucky to find a busted up anything with an acceptable amount of rust to even be savable.

It depends on what sort of cars you like. I prefer GM FWD cars as that's just what I know best having owned one for nearly 10 years and just picked up another as a mechanic`s special for $1000. My latest project is a 1999 Pontiac GTP coupe that needed some TLC. Plenty of performance, relatively cheap and plentiful parts and enough aftermarket support.

The GM V6 has its issues but given a proper dealership service manual and a good set of tools one can maintain them for a long time while learning the fundamentals of wrenching on cars. Then you can move one to something that's got more attitude.



posted on May, 26 2015 @ 04:15 AM
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From messing with cars the main things are having enough space to be able to sort it out and the tools to actually do the job, an inspection pit can be worth it if you have the ability to dig one and as for the tools they'll appear as you need them but a starter spanner set will probably cover most basic jobs, get a grinder and a bulk lot of the more standard bolts as you'll probably need them when you have to fix 50 years etc of rust

and don't forget to check with the web for the owner sites as they're a gold mine of information and you can chat to owners who will give you invaluable tips that might save you a fortune and even if you give up on the project they'll probably pay more for your half restored thing than a scrap yard will



posted on May, 26 2015 @ 09:50 AM
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a reply to: Ghost147
I would suggest a hands on type car or truck. Something you can get your hands around. Open the hood, if you can see everything and it easy to put your hands on it to be able to work on it then you are OK. So my suggestion would be something from the mid 50's to late 60's. But buy something that is running to begin with. Troubleshooting a non running car for a novice would be a bit out of your ball park right now. The car or truck does not have to have a V8 engine either. A simple 6 cylinder engine maybe a good place to start. With all that being said a 1969 Corvette would not be a good starter car.



posted on May, 26 2015 @ 12:50 PM
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originally posted by: Mugly

originally posted by: Tardacus
One of the most irritating things that they came up with is the security chip in the key, when the chip stops working you can`t start your car,you`ll be testing everything under the hood to find out why the car won`t start and never think about testing the key.


now a days they don`t teach mechanics how to diagnose a problem they tech them how to hook up a diagnostic machine to tell them what might be causing the problem.The mechanics fix what the machine tells them to fix without even checking to see if that is really what`s causing the problem.

.


ive worked on thousands of cars and have never ran into the problem of a car no starting because of the key.

mechanics still do plenty of diagnostics without using a scanner.
if the check engine light is on then yeah, it gets hooked up to pull a code.
not everything throws a light and not every problem that needs to be diagnosed is even engine related.

diagnostics is not limited to the engine or electrical


All good points indeed and that is a problem with the industry, people think a scan tool is hooked up and boom all the answers are there.. It just don't work that way, yes a lot of techs will throw parts at a vehicle to fix it but its not the way to do it. I was shop foreman in a GM/Jeep/Dodge/Subaru dealer for about 25+ years so there wasn't much I didn't see as far as problems. I retired in early 2014 because of health problems and just couldn't do it any longer.

The issue is with transponder keys and keys with a resistor chip built in them especially the Jeeps and other Dodge products. If the SKIM module (Jeep, Dodge, Chrysler) does not get the proper frequency or signal from a programmed key it will not start, the same goes for key FOBs with all the keyless entry buttons on them. On the newer products with out a key switch (push button start) the vehicle uses 3-5 receivers inside the doors, dash and other areas to pick up the key fob, if its not sending the signal or frequency then once again no start so yes a key can cause a no start condition.

The OP about learning to work on your own stuff is great, it just takes time and is a learning curve. There is a lot of great advice in this thread and I wish you luck and start with simple things.



posted on May, 26 2015 @ 01:58 PM
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a reply to: rogue7573

Thanks! I've done a bit of research, and the vehicles I would really enjoy starting out on are Pre-1980's. The whole electronic/sensor advent is something I don't feel entirely ready for yet, and I like the idea and image of older vehicles more. I think I would have more fun doing it, thus keeping me interested and on track; then moving up the ladder of years later on (I have a 2014 jeep wrangler, so I have the perfect vehicle to grab a whole lot of parts for and do pretty much anything I want to it).

Here's my list (based on part/cost availability and just because I like them):
1) Chevrolet Bel Air -- 1953-'54
2) Ford Model A -- 1928-'31
3) Ford Mustang -- 1964-'68
4) Chevrolet Camaro -- 1967-'69
5) Dodge Challenger -- 1972-'73
6) Pontiac Firebird -- 1970-'73
7) Oldsmobile Cutlass -- 1968-'72
8) Plymouth 'Cuda/Barracuda -- 1972-'74
9) Chevrolet Impala -- 1965
10) Chevrolet Chevelle -- 1971-'72
11) Plymouth Duster -- 1970-'73
12) Chevrolet Corvette -- 1978-'82
13) Dodge Charger -- 1968-'70

And here's the list my wife chose out of that existing list that I'm allowed to do (haha):

1) Chevrolet Camaro -- 1967-'69
2) Chevrolet Corvette -- 1978-'82
3) Chevrolet Chevelle -- 1971-'72

(I noticed afterwars that she chose all three Chevrolet's in the list, unintentionally)

At the moment I've pretty much chosen the corvette, and that's mainly due to how inexpensive they are. I can grab a fully functioning, not too much work needed, one for under $5,000. Which seems pretty reasonable to me. I'm looking for something that's not a complete overhaul, with minimal work needed to get my bearings on the whole hobby.

The only thing is, I'm not sure about part availability and cost to make it totally reliable and shiny again.

Out of those three vehicles, what would you guys recommend?



posted on May, 26 2015 @ 03:25 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147

Well I like your list and I really like your wife's list, you just cant go wrong with a 67 to 69 Camaro. I have had a couple of them over the years and always had a blast. As far as parts almost anything can be found on the internet but it may take some looking depending on what vehicle you end up with. The 3 that your wife likes should be real easy to find parts for, several companies specialize in model specific items. Do you plan on doing the body work as well ? If so the corvette will really take some planning and a lot of reading to do it right. Fiberglass can be a challenge sometimes and if its been in a wreck or had a rough past it can be overwhelming to get it right.

My youngest son wanted a 2 door 67 impala as a project car. It took me a little bit to find one but we are in the process of restoring it. Some parts have been terrible to find like the radiator core support and a right inner fender but we managed. Desert Valley Auto in Phoenix was a big help in some of those items. It can be a lot of fun and although I do not want my son doing this for a living he is learning quite a bit and I think its been a good experience for him.



posted on May, 26 2015 @ 04:05 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147

if it is down to those 3 i would go with the chevelle just for a personal choice.
good luck man.

the only thing that worries me is how do you really know if it is fully functioning with minimal work?
you admitted youre a novice so that would make me nervous...its your cash though man so go for it.

you'll be fine man.
just know that a lot of people get taken cause they go look at a car and the owner says it only needs this or that and people trust them cause they cant verify for themselves.

"oh yeah, all it needs is a valve cover gasket" and you buy it and turns out it has a blown head gasket or something...

in the end though you want something to work on so go for it.
even if it turns into more work than you expected, its kind of what you want.

good luck man

those chevelles are choice though



posted on May, 26 2015 @ 05:15 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147




The only thing is, I'm not sure about part availability and cost to make it totally reliable and shiny again.


Those all have a ton of parts floating around. They make reproductions of anything you'd want. If you had the money and patience you could basically build one from a catalog of parts.

I love old cars man, but I hope you have the time, patience, space and money to dump in. Quite a few cars on that list will have well over $50k dumped in before a guy considers them finished.

If I were you I would pick up some books and rebuild a 350. That engine goes in everything, tons of parts, tons you can do to it, takes up less space, you can sell it quick, it will give you a taste.

Remember that those cars you can pick up cheap need a ton of work, even if they look "nice". The suspension is going to need a lot of work, the interior will most likely need to be replaced if you want it to look decent, probably will need paint and bodywork, brakes should be replaced (and in my opinion swapped to discs), depending on the things past it's going to have rust issues.

Now after saying all that, it's going to be a TON of fun. It's just going to also be a huge pain in the ass, a money pit and require a lot of patience.

Your wife has good taste!



posted on May, 26 2015 @ 05:42 PM
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I figured the parts for all three of those models would be pretty easy to find. All very popular choices I hear. Essentially, I am expecting to do body work, engine stuff, and basically anything I can think of and more. Personally, just as long as it runs well and appears to be in working order - in all aspects - I don't mind spending a few years on the project.

I love internet forums, so when I do decide what model to go with, I'll definitely be signing up to a forum dedicated to it. I'm not looking to make a crazy, high-performance machine, which I assume will knock down the price of all the parts. I am also not looking to make-a-buck off of it, so specific manufacturer parts with all the serial numbers and what have you are also off the list. A working order, clean cut vehicle is all I want to produce at the moment. I assume I can swap out stuff later on if ever I feel the need to go all out and design the thing to beat a Ferrari in race (on a designated track of course). But, the basics is alright for now.

So, right now I think I'll just keep an eye out for those three models and see if any opportunities jump out. The project wont begin for probably another 1-2 years, but research is key to me.

Thanks for all the help fellas, I'll be sure to post a new thread once I get the ball rolling



posted on May, 26 2015 @ 06:42 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

good post.
this is true about the suspension. a lot of people totally overlook the suspension.

those are the kinds of things i was worried about for the OP.
for 5 grand everything will 'appear' to be in working order but it wont be. an experienced wrench will be able to look at the front suspension and be able to spot certain things that a novice wont.

a lot of those old cars were messed with so much they dont track right. suspension parts were replaced here and there.
i have seen some of those old cars with a half inch worth of shims on the upper or lower control arms. i would run for the hills if i saw that(just a personal thing for me. things i have seen through the years) but a novice might not even recognize it.

getting into a car to work on for fun is one thing. getting into a car that you think will need a little work and having it turn into a frame off is a major bummer.

ghost, just do it.

domo is correct about the 350.

since you are looking at some older cars, let me recommend a couple different ones.
for one reason or another, these are some of my fav's.

a 442 olds.
www.1hd1.com...&%20TRUCKS%20PREVIOUSLY%20SOLD/GM/70%20OLDS%20442/70%20OLDS%201.jpg

pontiac tempest
static.cargurus.com...

a charger with a 440 and three, 2bbl's
carphotos.cardomain.com...

buick wildcat
www.buickpedia.org...

mercury cougar
s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com...

i have never been a fan of the corvette. not big on 2 seaters and i have always felt like those are super overrated cars. just a personal thing.

if you pick up any of those cars on that list though you can have yourself a killer machine.

good luck




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