It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

March Against Monsanto Explodes Globally

page: 3
65
<< 1  2    4  5  6 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 24 2015 @ 09:33 PM
link   
www.youtube.com...=42

Here's a very short video (94 seconds) about a family that completely switches from GMO to organic foods for two weeks. Urine tests are done before and after the switch . Prior to the food switch, insecticides, fungicides and plant growth inhibitors were found in each family member's urine. Afterwards, they were all about nil. It was stated that we know little about long term effects of GMO's in the human body nor how they all interact. It's a proven fact that chemicals can be more harmful when combined together.

A friend of mine just lost a long time friend to brain cancer last week. She found out this week that her cousin now has brain cancer. Neither were cell phone users.

Too much increase of cancer and other diseases to ignore our food sources as a culprit. I'm really glad to see a united effort against Monsanto. They lie, cheat and bribe. Truly good products can ride on honesty and transparency.
edit on 24-5-2015 by StoutBroux because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 24 2015 @ 09:33 PM
link   
a reply to: MALBOSIA




A round-up ready feild will kill anything that is not sold by Monsanto.

What is a round-up ready field? How do GM plants contaminate soil?



Wheat is a crop of huge commercial importance. Wheat mostly self-pollinates and its pollen is quite heavy, meaning that it does not tend to drift far, but it still can, especially because wheat is a relative of some grasses that can act as recipients for its pollen and this is known as horizontal gene transfer.
You know that there is no GM wheat production, right?



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 09:33 PM
link   
a reply to: MALBOSIA

Cross pollination doesn't contaminate soil and it doesn't prevent people from planting crops either.



You said sou can't grow seed in gmo contaminated soil nothing you posted says you can't.



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 09:36 PM
link   

originally posted by: MALBOSIA

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: MALBOSIA




We cannot grow natural seed on GM contaminated soil.
Why not?
How do GM plants contaminate soil?


A round-up ready feild will kill anything that is not sold by Monsanto. That does not sound contaminated to you?

Then there is cross contamination. Plants that get pollinated through wind or insect are being contaminated by gmo versi9ns of their kind and farmers not intending to put GMO on the market have no control over the matter.


.

In GM crop fields, pollen drift and insect pollination create obvious problems for nearby non-GM or organic crops. Sugar beet, Maize and oil seed rape pollen is light enough to travel long distances. Unfortunately identifying cross contaminated plants is only possible by laboratory testing.

Wheat is a crop of huge commercial importance. Wheat mostly self-pollinates and its pollen is quite heavy, meaning that it does not tend to drift far, but it still can, especially because wheat is a relative of some grasses that can act as recipients for its pollen and this is known as horizontal gene transfer.

Is Prevention Possible?

Because of the inevitability of contamination of non-GM crops with GM pollen, the EU has established recommendations for thresholds of these inevitable contaminations. It also has guidance for buffer zones.



GMO contamination

I worry I may be in for a long one with you after calling you "the old guy" in another thread earlier.

To be clear, the field itself will not kill anything. The crop is "round up ready" meaning you can spray it and it won't die. Canola is a problem in town as it grows in the cracks of the sidewalks and how do you kill it?

If people are worried about GMOs, they should be prepared to give up A LOT of food and drinks!



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 09:37 PM
link   
a reply to: StoutBroux




Too much increase of cancer and other diseases to ignore our food sources as a culprit.

Who is ignoring food? Obesity seems to have a strong influence but several types of cancer have been showing declines in incidence.



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 09:39 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage



Glyphosate binds with and inactivates EPSPS, the critical enzyme in the shikimate pathway required for the synthesis of aromatic plant metabolites including essential amino acids phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine, as well as downstream products such as plant growth promoter, indoylacetic acid and plant defence compounds, phytoalexins [4]. But glyphosate has multiple adverse effects that act synergistically on crop health and productivity that extends well beyond the plant into the soil ecosystem and the wider environment.

The GT trait depends on incorporating an EPSPS from the soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens that is insensitive to glyphosate, hence glyphosate is taken up by GT plants and translocated to the growing parts of roots and shoots, and even exuded into the rhizosphere (soil surrounding the roots) so it can affect the soil community of microorganisms and also subsequent crops planted in the soil.

www.i-sis.org.uk...



edit on 24-5-2015 by StoutBroux because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 09:42 PM
link   

originally posted by: StoutBroux
a reply to: Phage



Glyphosate binds with and inactivates EPSPS, the critical enzyme in the shikimate pathway required for the synthesis of aromatic plant metabolites including essential amino acids phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine, as well as downstream products such as plant growth promoter, indoylacetic acid and plant defence compounds, phytoalexins [4]. But glyphosate has multiple adverse effects that act synergistically on crop health and productivity that extends well beyond the plant into the soil ecosystem and the wider environment.

The GT trait depends on incorporating an EPSPS from the soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens that is insensitive to glyphosate, hence glyphosate is taken up by GT plants and translocated to the growing parts of roots and shoots, and even exuded into the rhizosphere (soil surrounding the roots) so it can affect the soil community of microorganisms and also subsequent crops planted in the soil.

www.i-sis.org.uk...



You have explained HOW it works. Were you trying to say that it stays in the soil?



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 09:45 PM
link   
a reply to: StoutBroux

I asked how GM plants contaminate soil.

You know that the use of glyphosate is not exclusive to GM crops, right?

When glyphosate was introduced in 1974 it was initially used after the harvest in the autumn on stubble fields. This “post-harvest pre-planting” management is still an important tool for controlling weeds prior to planting the next crop. Farmers use this management strategy for winter crops especially, such as winter wheat and oilseed rape, which are often infested with annual weeds like black grass (Alopecurus myosuriodes) and rye grasses (Lolium spec.) that can be difficult to control before harvesting.



Since many annual weeds flower early and their seeds germinate immediately after harvest, farmers generally apply glyphosate in the autumn, 4 – 6 weeks after harvest, to clear fields of these weeds and volunteer crops.



Another common application method for glyphosate herbicides is spraying after sowing, but before the new crop emerges. The “post-harvest pre-emergence” practice is used to control weeds that may have been transplanted or grown from seeds after the crop was planted.


www.glyphosate.eu...

edit on 5/24/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)

edit on 5/24/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 09:54 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: MALBOSIA




A round-up ready feild will kill anything that is not sold by Monsanto.

What is a round-up ready field? How do GM plants contaminate soil?



Wheat is a crop of huge commercial importance. Wheat mostly self-pollinates and its pollen is quite heavy, meaning that it does not tend to drift far, but it still can, especially because wheat is a relative of some grasses that can act as recipients for its pollen and this is known as horizontal gene transfer.
You know that there is no GM wheat production, right?



The soil is contaminated with weed killer that only a GM seed could grow in.

The use of GM plants contaminates soil.


 

During this biotechnology process, genes from one species are transferred into the DNA of another species. Throughout the life cycle of a genetically modified, or transgenic plant, modified genetic material is replicated and transferred through natural life cycle processes. Thus the transformed genes are expressed in all of the seeds that crop bears. The modified genetic material also spreads through natural pollination to other transgenic crops, nontransgenic crops, and even native plants. Thus, it is extraordinarily difficult to restrict gene flow to a single field or crop



How is it possible for a GMO crop to NOT contaminate an organic crop?

I never mentioned wheat.

Edit: I forgot the LINK
edit on 24-5-2015 by MALBOSIA because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 09:58 PM
link   

originally posted by: superman2012

originally posted by: MALBOSIA

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: MALBOSIA




We cannot grow natural seed on GM contaminated soil.
Why not?
How do GM plants contaminate soil?


A round-up ready feild will kill anything that is not sold by Monsanto. That does not sound contaminated to you?

Then there is cross contamination. Plants that get pollinated through wind or insect are being contaminated by gmo versi9ns of their kind and farmers not intending to put GMO on the market have no control over the matter.


.

In GM crop fields, pollen drift and insect pollination create obvious problems for nearby non-GM or organic crops. Sugar beet, Maize and oil seed rape pollen is light enough to travel long distances. Unfortunately identifying cross contaminated plants is only possible by laboratory testing.

Wheat is a crop of huge commercial importance. Wheat mostly self-pollinates and its pollen is quite heavy, meaning that it does not tend to drift far, but it still can, especially because wheat is a relative of some grasses that can act as recipients for its pollen and this is known as horizontal gene transfer.

Is Prevention Possible?

Because of the inevitability of contamination of non-GM crops with GM pollen, the EU has established recommendations for thresholds of these inevitable contaminations. It also has guidance for buffer zones.



GMO contamination

I worry I may be in for a long one with you after calling you "the old guy" in another thread earlier.

To be clear, the field itself will not kill anything. The crop is "round up ready" meaning you can spray it and it won't die. Canola is a problem in town as it grows in the cracks of the sidewalks and how do you kill it?

If people are worried about GMOs, they should be prepared to give up A LOT of food and drinks!


The feild itself is going to kill anything non GMO. it is full of pesticides.

I guess if you see weeds in your sidewalk a "problem" then there is nothing anyone can say to appease your demand for a more sterile environment or less work on your hands. You know you can just pick weeds right? And when they come back, you pick them again.



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 10:08 PM
link   
a reply to: MALBOSIA

Weeds will still come back even if you kill them with round up. It isn't a one time use. The effects do not last very long.

BTW you can plant non GMOs right next to GMOs and they will both grow.



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 10:10 PM
link   
a reply to: superman2012



Roundup Ready system alters the whole soil biology

Robert Kremer is a microbiologist with the USDA-ARS (US Department of Agriculture- Agricultural Research Service) and an adjunct professor in the Division of Plant Sciences at the University of Missouri. He started in 1997 to investigate how the new Monsanto Roundup Ready system (Roundup herbicide and GT cropping) would change the level of nematodes in soybean. His research team began looking at the roots and saw microorganisms colonizing the roots, and suspected that glyphosate was having an impact. There was a root fungi problem that seemed to encourage sudden death syndrome.

In fact, the system is “altering the whole soil biology.” Kremer told The Organic & Non-GM Report [7]. “We are seeing differences in bacteria in plant roots and changes in nutrient availability. Many studies show that glyphosate can have toxic effects on [some] microorganisms and can stimulate [others] to germinate spores and colonize roots systems. Other researchers are showing that glyphosate can immobilize manganese, an essential plant micronutrient.”

Glyphosate is toxic to beneficial bacteria like rhiozbia, which fixes nitrogen, but increases the incidence of pathogens like Fusarium. “Some Roundup Ready varieties even without using glyphosate, tend to be more susceptible to Fusarium,” possibly an unintended effect of genetic modification.

If the soil is full of phosphate (as when livestock manure is used as a fertilizer), glyphosate could leach into ground water (and poison other wild-life and human beings).

“We saw the increase of these fungi in the Roundup Ready system, both soybeans and corn.” Kremer said.

www.i-sis.org.uk...


Yes



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 10:17 PM
link   

originally posted by: Grimpachi
a reply to: MALBOSIA

Weeds will still come back even if you kill them with round up. It isn't a one time use. The effects do not last very long.

BTW you can plant non GMOs right next to GMOs and they will both grow.


Except when you crop, the organic farmer will fail tests being contaminated with GMO. That is why they have buffer zones that clearly have failed. Light pullin can be carried a great distance in high winds.

You have no choice but to consume GMO. same goes with antibiotics. Nobody can say for sure how it is happening but organic chicken farmers are still ending up with antibiotics in their eggs. That is iff tipic I know but the guidlines and policies protecting organic is failing.



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 10:17 PM
link   

Potential effects of Genetically Engineered (GE) crops on soil microbes

In genetic engineering, a package of novel genes are inserted into the recipient organism. In addition to the desired property gene, a number of other genes have to be added to ensure successful insertion.

Among the potentially problematic genes inserted into plants, those that help overcome the barriers against the introduction of foreign genes are of particular interest in the context of soil ecology. They function as vectors for successful insertion and prevent rejection of inserted foreign genes. These vector packages are chimaeric combinations of genetic elements commonly from pathogenic bacteria and viruses and from transposons.

Ho, M.W. & Tappeser, B. (1997) have proposed that the vector DNA in GE crops may promote horizontal transfer of genetic material between unrelated bacterial species. They warned that the result may be new human pathogenic bacteria.

This idea was further developed by Ho, M.W. et al. (1998). They refer to experimental observations indicating the possibility of gene transfer not only between related bacteria but also between bacteria of different species, as well as between bacteria and fungi and between bacteria and higher organisms, including mammals. They warn that the vector DNA may be transferred from GE plants to soil bacteria and soil fungi and contribute to increased horizontal transfer. They suggest that this may have contributed to the emergence of new human pathogenic bacteria during the last 10-15 years, some of which have been very harmful.
www.psrast.org...



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 10:23 PM
link   
a reply to: StoutBroux

No...lol

Did you not know that ISIS isn't a scientific journal and the author of that article Mae-Wan Ho seems to be a quack?


Ho is a co-founder and director of the Institute of Science in Society (ISIS), an interest group that campaigns against what it sees as unethical uses of biotechnology.[9] The group published about climate change, GMOs, homeopathy, traditional Chinese medicine, and water memory.

In reviewing the organisation, David Colquhoun accused the ISIS of promoting pseudoscience and specifically criticised Ho's understanding of homeopathy.[7]

The institute is on the Quackwatch list of questionable organizations.[




Institute of Science in Society: beware!


The Institute of Science in Society purports to be about promoting a socially responsible approach to science. It combines some reasonable stuff about global warming with a lot of utter rubbish about homeopathy (mainly written by the Institute’s director, Dr Mae-Wan Ho).

(This item has been transferred from the old IMPROBABLE SCIENCE page.)

I just stumbled across this organisation. At first sight, its theme of “science, society and sustainability” sounded right up my street. It seems to be predominantly an anti-GM, pro-organic farming, organisation. Although some of their contributors seem to be somewhat paranoid, there is much that I can agree with in what they say about that.

But they completely ruin their case by including quite barmy homilies about homeopathy (and here), water structure and traditional chinese medicine. There is also an amazing piece of sheer pseudo-scientific nonsense, “Homeopathic Medicine is Nanopharmacology” by Dana Ullman (though elsewhere on the site, nanotechnology gets a bad press).

Most of the nutty content seems to be written by the director of the Institute herself. Dr Mae-Wan Ho, who is listed as “Reader in Biology at the Open University” (that’s odd -no trace of her on the Open University web site). In fact some doubts have been cast on her biography. Wikipedia says “She is former head of the Bio-Electrodynamics laboratory at the Open University in Milton Keynes after either having been fired for incompetence or resigning because of personal reasons.” Whatever the truth in that may be, she clearly doesn’t understand homeopathy.


Even those who are anti GM know she is a nut.



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 10:29 PM
link   

originally posted by: MALBOSIA

originally posted by: Grimpachi
a reply to: MALBOSIA

Weeds will still come back even if you kill them with round up. It isn't a one time use. The effects do not last very long.

BTW you can plant non GMOs right next to GMOs and they will both grow.


Except when you crop, the organic farmer will fail tests being contaminated with GMO. That is why they have buffer zones that clearly have failed. Light pullin can be carried a great distance in high winds.

You have no choice but to consume GMO. same goes with antibiotics. Nobody can say for sure how it is happening but organic chicken farmers are still ending up with antibiotics in their eggs. That is iff tipic I know but the guidlines and policies protecting organic is failing.


You do realize cross-pollination goes both ways right?

Also it is up to the farmers on what they plant seems you want to remove their ability to choose. As far as the organic farmer failing tests I am not sure what you are talking about. What tests and what do those tests have to do with your claim that .....


We cannot grow natural seed on GM contaminated soil.



Obviously you can.



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 10:32 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: StoutBroux




Too much increase of cancer and other diseases to ignore our food sources as a culprit.

Who is ignoring food? Obesity seems to have a strong influence but several types of cancer have been showing declines in incidence.


Phage , the one voice of reason. Not just obesity but diabetes is now strongly linked to cancer by Oncologists. Thats the first thing they want you to do. Get that blood sugar under control .
edit on 24-5-2015 by Gothmog because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 10:32 PM
link   
a reply to: MALBOSIA


The soil is contaminated with weed killer that only a GM seed could grow in.
Read my post above yours.



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 10:47 PM
link   

originally posted by: Grimpachi

originally posted by: MALBOSIA

originally posted by: Grimpachi
a reply to: MALBOSIA

Weeds will still come back even if you kill them with round up. It isn't a one time use. The effects do not last very long.

BTW you can plant non GMOs right next to GMOs and they will both grow.


Except when you crop, the organic farmer will fail tests being contaminated with GMO. That is why they have buffer zones that clearly have failed. Light pullin can be carried a great distance in high winds.

You have no choice but to consume GMO. same goes with antibiotics. Nobody can say for sure how it is happening but organic chicken farmers are still ending up with antibiotics in their eggs. That is iff tipic I know but the guidlines and policies protecting organic is failing.


You do realize cross-pollination goes both ways right?

Also it is up to the farmers on what they plant seems you want to remove their ability to choose. As far as the organic farmer failing tests I am not sure what you are talking about. What tests and what do those tests have to do with your claim that .....


We cannot grow natural seed on GM contaminated soil.



Obviously you can.


The Canadian food inspection agency does on-farm testing for pesticide residue and other criterias needed to hold an organic certificate.

Oh and gues ls what has been found:


Nearly half the organic fresh fruits and vegetables tested across Canada in the past two years contained pesticide residue, according to a CBC News analysis of data supplied by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).


And obviously you cannot GM feilds are full of pesticides. So how can non gmo grow in it.

I would not ask that farmers not be allowed to choose what to grow or raise. They did not decide for themselves to use so many pesticides but their greed and lazyness does not encourage them to object. Farmers are worse than oil drillers IMO.



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 10:50 PM
link   
a reply to: MALBOSIA


And obviously you cannot GM feilds are full of pesticides. So how can non gmo grow in it.
Ask the farmers who have been using it since before there were GM crops.


When glyphosate was introduced in 1974 it was initially used after the harvest in the autumn on stubble fields. This “post-harvest pre-planting” management is still an important tool for controlling weeds prior to planting the next crop. Farmers use this management strategy for winter crops especially, such as winter wheat and oilseed rape, which are often infested with annual weeds like black grass (Alopecurus myosuriodes) and rye grasses (Lolium spec.) that can be difficult to control before harvesting.



Since many annual weeds flower early and their seeds germinate immediately after harvest, farmers generally apply glyphosate in the autumn, 4 – 6 weeks after harvest, to clear fields of these weeds and volunteer crops.



Another common application method for glyphosate herbicides is spraying after sowing, but before the new crop emerges. The “post-harvest pre-emergence” practice is used to control weeds that may have been transplanted or grown from seeds after the crop was planted.


www.glyphosate.eu...



They did not decide for themselves to use so many pesticides
They didn't?
edit on 5/24/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)




top topics



 
65
<< 1  2    4  5  6 >>

log in

join