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A Word that You Should Never Utilize

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posted on May, 20 2015 @ 12:28 PM
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British slang is hilarious. I'm trying to learn more of it.




posted on May, 20 2015 @ 12:52 PM
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a reply to: cooperton

Indeed! I was taught in creative writing courses to always use the most familiar and common term, unless the less common term conveyed a specific meaning not generally conveyed by the more familiar term.

What makes me crazy is the mis-use of the word "comprise"... but that's a whole other thread...



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 12:55 PM
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Some people just like to use a wide variety of words. It doesn't always mean that they are wanting to sound smart.

Sometimes, I feel like people perceive me as uppity because of the words I choose. I had a coworker that didn't appreciate when asked "how are you?" I would answer "I'm doing well".



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 01:05 PM
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a reply to: chelsdh

i talk like i write here on ATS.

You can imagine that people ask me to restate things quite a bit.



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 01:06 PM
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When people use words incorrectly, it makes me very photosynthesis.



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 01:16 PM
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a reply to: cooperton

No, you're not. I absolutely loathe it. LOATHE!

After about 5 years of proofing apartment complex newsletters, you have no idea how many brain cells died screaming in agony every time I had to read some complex manager attempting to look smart by telling their renters to "utilize the BBQ grills provided on the property" or "please utilize the doggy doo stations when walking your dog" or some other absolutely stupid thing which would have been a lot less silly with plain old use.



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 01:16 PM
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originally posted by: chelsdh
I had a coworker that didn't appreciate when asked "how are you?" I would answer "I'm doing well".



If I had to utilize my imagination to determine why this might be;

They probably didnt really care at all how you were, but that they were just performing a reflexively mechanistic customed nicety.

So when you failed to respond with the equally customed and expected cultural response of 'good, how are you?'; it bothered your coworker;

Because, there contains some uncertainty, or lacking, or introspection, or doubt, in your response;

im doing well;

Well, is not good, well is not great, well is not fantastic.

Im doing well; sounds like it contains some struggle, as if it implies not well enough, could be weller;

As if it signifies in the coworker, the questioning of whether they should sympathize with you, in any way, from drifting from the more standard, mechanistic protocol; How are you? Good, how are you? Good. Good. Good.



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 01:22 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko

telling their renters to "utilize the BBQ grills provided on the property"



Wow, quite ironically you have utilized the term in a manner which brings to light a possible true distinctive value of its utilization.

Now I see that in your example, there is an air of politeness involved with the term;

Use the BBQ grills provided on the property

Sounds like a demand, a command, a threat, a force.

Whereas;

Utilize the BBQ grills provided on the property

Sounds like an invitation, a concerned and gentle helpful motive. The drawing of attention to possibility, the giving of freedom. Like, please enjoy the potential of your use.

"Excuse me sir can I use your wife?"

"Excuse me sir can I utilize your wife?"



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 01:24 PM
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originally posted by: TomLawless
There is one thing I know for sure. The grammar being used by a significantly large portion of the Above Top Secret community is far below reasonable expectations.

The inabililty to indentify the correct application of "their", "they're", and "there" are chief amongst them.

Deny Ignorance, indeed.


I know the correct use of the three, but after proof reading for four hours, and then coming home to ATS, I have a tendency to have picked up bad habits. Sometimes, I type the wrong one without thinking about it.

Their - is the possessive. The kids enjoyed their game.

There - is the location. Hey! It's right over there.

They're - is the contraction of they and are. They're going to eat out tonight.

Sometimes, I catch myself and fix it, and sometimes I don't. Something else I've picked up over the years. The one person whose work is going to hardest to proof is your own. That's because your brain knows what you intended to write and it tends to substitute in the word it expects to be there. So had I actually typed "their" in that previous sentence, I might not have caught it simply because I've already spent four hours today proofing so my "eye" is fatigued and my brain knows that "there" is what ought to be there and what I intended to write. I might miss it as a result.

When I worked with kids who had literacy-based learning disabilities, one of the techniques we taught to help with this involved a type of proofing where you go backwards, last word to first. That helps you break up the meaning of the text which helps your brain focus on what the word actually is and less on what your brain thinks it should be.



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 01:26 PM
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a reply to: ImaFungi

Considering they simply meant use the grills on the property and not any on your balcony because it's illegal and we don't want our property burned down ... yeah, use is more appropriate because it's not an invitation. It is an order.



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 01:27 PM
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a reply to: cooperton

Maybe the people who use that word are in fact more sophisticated than you?

Just kidding!

I'm not saying they are, just raising the possibility and poking fun at you.

My vocabulary favors the longer words when I speak but that is because I speak several languages and do my best to respect them and not slaughter them with slang and simple words when I could speak the language's full potential.

I tend to utilize the bigger more "sophisticated" words whenever I can.

I find it to be good practice.

That being said, I get your point in regards to your OP.

Some people spew verbal diarrhea and you can tell they are "trying hard"


Good day to you



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 01:30 PM
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a reply to: cooperton



or.

ppl say utilize to much. dey shld jus say use. they thnk thy sound so smrt with thair big words an such.






you could have reduced your entire op down to the above sentence. why didnt you? i mean if your only point is being efficient. less letters. less syllables and you knew right what i was saying. so whats different? is it such a bad thing that speaking/typing like an idiot will sound like an idiot? or wouldn't you rather we strive to improve the way we communicate not just with regard to efficiency but also some gosh darn hootin tootin class!


you want efficiency start memorizing all the net lingo abbreviations txt jargon etc etc. those are efficient. you want to sound like your IQ is higher then a potato use some big words instead.



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 01:32 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: ImaFungi

Considering they simply meant use the grills on the property and not any on your balcony because it's illegal and we don't want our property burned down ... yeah, use is more appropriate because it's not an invitation. It is an order.



I will consider that;

Though did my example not allow us to consider there might be potential contexts in which there is a valuable difference in the words?

I have no final conclusion, but I am hesitant to commit to the thought that they are entirely equal besides in quantity of letter.



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 01:33 PM
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a reply to: ImaFungi

Well, that's a possible reason. Though, I usually followed up with "How are you?".

He didn't appreciate it because, as you pointed out, it wasn't the "norm". I was taught when "I'm good" was not considered grammatically correct. It was branded in my mind.

It is correct to use now, as I recently discovered.



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 01:39 PM
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originally posted by: ImaFungi

originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: ImaFungi

Considering they simply meant use the grills on the property and not any on your balcony because it's illegal and we don't want our property burned down ... yeah, use is more appropriate because it's not an invitation. It is an order.



I will consider that;

Though did my example not allow us to consider there might be potential contexts in which there is a valuable difference in the words?

I have no final conclusion, but I am hesitant to commit to the thought that they are entirely equal besides in quantity of letter.


All right, figure this one out:

"We're thrilled with the new security cameras we've installed at the gates to detour crime. We can tell they are already working. We've caught two people ramming the gates in their cars."

There are at least two problems I see with that one.



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 01:48 PM
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originally posted by: skalla
a reply to: cooperton

Yarps, one could just use "use" instead.

Now:

Buglarized.

I have heard this used on US TV shows.

It's fekking "Burgled" and has been for maybe several hundred years..... it annoys me so much that once i burst a blood vessel and had to be Doctorized.


Well in all my born days, I absolutely did not know that! I wonder what would happen if someone broke in my house and I called 911 and said I'd been 'burgled' ...hahaha it just sounds so hilarious, I can't stop laughing!



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko


"We're thrilled with the new security cameras we've installed at the gates to detour crime. We can tell they are already working. We've caught two people ramming the gates in their cars."



I have no clue.

I want to say;

'ramming the gates 'with*' their cars'.

It seems quite fine to me though.

Also I am irked by; 'we can tell they are already working';

'we've caught....'

It is not so much of a 'we can tell' situation, as of a 'we know'.

Though it also leaves out any potential nature of the situation or intention of people ramming their gates. How often have these gates been rammed in the past? How are the cameras deterring the ramming?



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 02:00 PM
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I guess it comes down to 'utilization' of the word. LOL.

If it's used in context where you're speaking about something technical or 'above average' and it 'fits' - then sure, use it.

What gets me, is when people try to use it to 'puff up' something average or mundane.

I have a brother in law who did/does this.

Instead of saying 'warehouse manager' he says things like 'Inventory Control Management'. It gets much worse, but the fact that people would over state using a word that doesn't fit kinda bugs me....

However, people are free to speak however they like, those hearing their words are also free to think of them as they see fit. LOL



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 02:02 PM
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a reply to: ImaFungi

First off, the word they want was deter not detour, but deter means to discourage, so if people are still ramming the gates with their cars, then their cameras aren't actually working already.

So, they are trying to use a word that they neither know how to spell nor know what it means, but it sounds impressive!


edit on 20-5-2015 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 02:04 PM
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a reply to: BlackboxInquiry

To be fair, most places these days list jobs with those titles in order to make your job sound more impressive than it is. That may actually be his job title.



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