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An interesting flooring idea for those who want to remodel

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posted on May, 19 2015 @ 12:08 AM
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Hello, ATS! My friends just got a new place and have been redoing their floors. It's been a huge amount of work, what with moving stuff, ripping up the old carpet, scraping, and pulling nails and tacks. That doesn't include the new flooring.
That brings me to the topic at hand. What they're doing is ripping pieces of brown contractor's paper up and dunking it in glue, and then laying it on the floor. They're using a 2 part Elmer's white glue (big jugs sold at Lowes or most places like that) and 1 part water. The paper has to be saturated. Crumple it up before dunking. Make sure that it's completely covered. Squeeze out any excess liquid but not too much. You want it wet but not dripping all over the place. Then, unfold it so that the paper is flat and lay it down where you want it. Make sure that there are no wrinkles or creases. You want a straight edge along the walls. The rest of the pieces are random shapes. When you lay them down, make sure that the pieces overlap about 2 inches. Make sure that the floor is completely covered. Also, the pieces they were using were anywhere from 4 to 6 inches. They just did one layer.
The glue will dry clear. It takes a day (24 hours) to dry. I guess you could use a dye on the paper if you want to add color but they just did it plain brown paper. The end result is neat. You have all of these lines from the paper edges and with it being random shapes, it looks cool. After that, put on some polyurethane to seal it. My friend is doing that tomorrow. It'll take 72 hours for that to dry before we can walk on it and move stuff back into the room.
Now, it's a very messy process, as you can imagine. You don't want to wear any good clothes. They won't be the same again afterward.
This method dates back to the Great Depression in the 1930's when people didn't have a lot of money to work with. They typically used the paper grocery bags but the contractor paper is about the same. Now, for some pics:





That's it. Neat, huh? If you have any questions, I'll pass them along to my friend and get them answered for you.

ETA: I should also note that the paper has a dark side and a light side. It's not always easy to tell which is which while you're laying it down because both sides are covered with glue. If you can figure it out, and are of an artistic turn of mind, you might be able to make patterns with the light and dark pieces, much like a mosaic. Anyway, I thought that it was a neat idea and thought that I'd pass it along to all of you.
edit on 19-5-2015 by Skid Mark because: (no reason given)

edit on 19-5-2015 by Skid Mark because: spelling




posted on May, 19 2015 @ 12:18 AM
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Cool idea, I do remods and rarely see a new floor covering I've never heard of.

You could do almost limitless different designs with this system.

It would be cool to see it done with antique newspapers.

You could use this in wet areas like bathrooms also.




posted on May, 19 2015 @ 12:25 AM
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a reply to: Mandroid7

I liked the idea because of the limitless designs. Using antique newspaper is an interesting idea.



posted on May, 19 2015 @ 12:27 AM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

Sounds like a neat idea.

Just a suggestion, but see if your friend will pour the polyurethane on instead of spread it with the roller. The finish is thicker much more vibrant and will give you a better 3-D effect. But you will use considerably more polyurethane. It's a little more expensive but the difference between the two is drastic. Ask whoever you have doing the job about it?



posted on May, 19 2015 @ 12:41 AM
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I found videos of people doing this so you can see it being done, and for added info.

These people used larger pieces of paper and were a bit neater. They used a paint brush.

This is if you have concrete sub floors.

This is how we did it basically but his mixture looks more watery than ours.

This is a video showing the flooring 4 years after it was laid. It looks like it holds up pretty well.



posted on May, 19 2015 @ 12:43 AM
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a reply to: Greathouse

I'll ask my friend. He's the one doing it. He said the poly was the most expensive part of the job.



posted on May, 19 2015 @ 12:51 AM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

ive heard of this before....and i like the results. Very interesting. I have a couple of floors that will need redoing (one is a basement), and all options are on the table.

Something I have done, liked, and found pretty affordable was to sit down with buckets of pennies, and some tubes of liquid nails, and lay down a copper penny floor.

I have thought about doing it in rosettes with nickles at the center.

Thanks for sharing.....more food for thought.



posted on May, 19 2015 @ 12:58 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

You're very welcome. I've heard of the penny idea. That would be cool. There are a lot of videos on youtube if you want to go the paper route. Good luck and have fun.



posted on May, 19 2015 @ 03:03 AM
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That looks cool, I have a friend who did similar but with a piece of rather large Tapa cloth. If you don't know what Tapa cloth is, it's made from the inner bark of the mulberry tree and then painted with designs from which ever pacific island made it, her floor looked really cool. a reply to: Skid Mark




posted on May, 19 2015 @ 09:24 AM
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a reply to: Cloudbuster
Your friend's floor sounds cool. How do you get Tapa cloth? Do they sell it or do you have to find a mulberry tree and peel it off yourself?



posted on May, 19 2015 @ 09:57 AM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

Floor looks great!

I was reading about this last year when I was inspired to look into some alternative flooring solutions after seeing what a friend and his wife had done with their kitchen floor. They made a floor out of pennies. Their floor wasn't quite as fancy as this because they didn't create any sort of pattern using contrasting colors but you get the idea:



I don't remember what they used for the lacquer but I don't believe it was Elmer's glue.



posted on May, 19 2015 @ 10:35 AM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

That floor looks cool. I think that the penny idea is neat.



posted on May, 19 2015 @ 03:41 PM
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Hmmm, I may have to look into this.

We have a basement that is prone to being flooded. So something that is inexpensive, looks cool and is water resistant is what we need when we get around to trying to refinish it. The previous idiots put in padded carpeting.



posted on May, 19 2015 @ 04:10 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

my basement doesn't flood (its the desert here, afterall). But it can get very damp, and after heavy rains ground water can start to permeate a little. So the paint on the walls starts to bubble up a little, and we touch it up every so often.

Flooring....another issue altogether. Its too damp for mastic and/or thinset. I have thought about various types of wood....but it would warp quick enough to not be worth it.

The fitness center at a local hotel has the answer. Its a vinyl floor that has a decent wood like appearance, but its made for the beating you get in a fitness center. And it takes water pretty well.



posted on May, 19 2015 @ 06:03 PM
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Would be cool to use beer bottle caps for a bar area covered in poly. Or maybe just the bar top.

The possibilities are endless actually.



posted on May, 19 2015 @ 08:21 PM
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originally posted by: jtrenthacker
Would be cool to use beer bottle caps for a bar area covered in poly. Or maybe just the bar top.

The possibilities are endless actually.


That would be interesting, top up of course. I'd hate to step on the pointy things. I'm sure I could find enough around here to do the floors, walls, ceilings, and then 20 more houses just like that.
edit on 19-5-2015 by Skid Mark because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 19 2015 @ 08:25 PM
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Tapa cloth is made on most pacific islands, do you know any Samoan people I hear there are quite a lot in the states with America taking over part of Samoa. Sorry to say it but just google it, prob somewhere in the states that sell it, not sure if hawai'i makes it but they prob do..a reply to: Skid Mark



posted on May, 19 2015 @ 09:40 PM
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a reply to: Cloudbuster

I don't know any. I'll look it up. Thanks.



posted on May, 20 2015 @ 05:48 PM
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We just put a coating of polyurethane on the floor a couple hours ago. Here in a bit we'll put down another. I think there is enough left for 2 more coats. I'll be posting pics once it's finished, and when my friend puts pics up. It'll be a couple of days maybe because it has to dry.



posted on Jul, 6 2016 @ 08:41 PM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

OH WOW! This is brilliant...thank you so much for pointing me over here!!!





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