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California Golf Courses going "Brown" on Purpose

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posted on May, 18 2015 @ 12:41 PM
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Hi all! I found this little bit of sanity in the news today, and thought I'd share.
I applaud this effort by California, and it's a good testament to "grass-roots" problem-solving (heh...pun intended).

California golf courses tear up turf for drought resistant plants


Some of the poshest courses are bringing in vegetation that needs little water

Also installing high-tech moisture monitoring systems

State regulators ordered a 25 overall cut in the use of drinkable water in California last week
An average 18-hole course - 110 to 115 acres - uses almost 90 million gallons of water per year

- See more at: www.bostonnewstime.com...

I've never understood why desert-dwellers have insisted on lush green lawns...I live in a wet part of the country along the Missouri and Kansas rivers, and we've learned not to try to grow "tropicals" here, but go with native plants that attract pollinators and grow with minimal maintenance.

The article says regulars "ordered a 25 overall cut" which I'm surmising means 25% - and residents are asked to let their lawns wilt. The golf courses are being rebated for doing this, which is fine, I guess - but why do people have to be "paid" to do what is common sense? We need potable water for drinking, but not necessarily for showers and CERTAINLY not for "lawns". I've been systematically tearing out the grass that was sowed in my 76-year old yard for years now, and allowing native vegetation to move in, like clover, moss, creeping ground covers, etc.

I'm the same way with my gardens. I'll plant you and help you get rooted, but I'm not going to "baby" you - you either sink or swim in my yard (heh...that pun was not intended but I'll leave it anyway).


At first glance, nothing seems amiss at this lush, members-only golf club in one of the priciest communities in Orange County.

A bubbling fountain gurgles out of an artificial lake.

Emerald-green fairways stretch into the distance. Golf carts zoom across the grass like white ants.

But behind the man-made stream and arcing sprinklers, California's epic drought is reshaping the course at El Niguel Country Club and dozens of others statewide.

Pressed by the four-year dry spell and state-mandated water cuts, some of the finest courses in California are taking such steps as tearing out the grass in places where it won't affect the game, planting drought-resistant vegetation, letting the turf turn brown in spots and installing smart watering systems.

- See more at: www.bostonnewstime.com...


The article here is loaded with photos as well.
Will Cali have to stop watering itself to death to grow the things like almonds and so forth, that are kinda "luxury" items, and already VERY pricey?

What do you guys think about this?
The Colorado river has for a LONG TIME not reached the ocean anymore due to irrigation, damming upriver, etc. For AT LEAST 25 years, probably more. It seems to me that places like Southern Cali and Vegas and Phoenix and etc should all be doing this. I know there's been a movement to do it since the 70s when I was in high school - this whole "off-grid" and "sustainable eco policies" are not new, despite a resurgence of attention to it.

Just thought I'd throw this out there and see what you all think.

edit on 5/18/2015 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 18 2015 @ 01:27 PM
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a reply to: BuzzyWigs

Many golf course superintendents already fight to conserve water as many course biggest expense is their water bill. The biggest challenge will be for course owners convincing members and golfers to continue to play their course. It's a matter of changing players perception of what are acceptable playing conditions.

From your first link.

'The new buzzword in the industry is 'Brown is the new green.' We can't provide the same kind of product as we'd like to anymore,' said Mike Williams of Hidden Valley Golf Club in Norco. 'Everybody can't play on a lush green surface like the Masters.'




edit on 18-5-2015 by Observationalist because: Added ex text



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 02:08 PM
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As they should, watering people and food should come first.



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 02:11 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Tell that to the multi billion dollar wine industry that is CA.



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 02:12 PM
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originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
The golf courses are being rebated for doing this, which is fine, I guess - but why do people have to be "paid" to do what is common sense?


They should take Carl Spackler's advice and grow a hybrid, say, a cross between Kentucky Bluegrass, Featherbed Bent, and Northern California Sensemilia. The amazing stuff about this is, that you can play 36 holes on it in the afternoon, take it home and just get stoned to the bejeezus-belt that night on this stuff.






edit on 18-5-2015 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 02:17 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
The golf courses are being rebated for doing this, which is fine, I guess - but why do people have to be "paid" to do what is common sense?


They should take Carl Spackler's advice and grow a hybrid, say, a cross between Kentucky Bluegrass, Featherbed Bent, and Northern California Sensemilia. The amazing stuff about this is, that you can play 36 holes on it in the afternoon, take it home and just get stoned to the bejeezus-belt that night on this stuff.







Lol, a true Cinderella story.



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 02:53 PM
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Does anyone remember the last drought, when people started spray painting their dead grass green?



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 03:09 PM
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Are the golf courses not already using reclaimed water? Here in Arizona you see a lot of places that use reclaimed water to keep things green. The reclaimed water apparently isn't quite good enough to have people drink, so they reclaim it and use it as much as possible on golf courses, parks, etc.

You see a lot of signs like this in Arizona: arizonaexperience.org...


Reclaimed water, or effluent, is the one increasing water source in our state. As our population and water use grows, more treated wastewater will be available. Reclaimed water is treated to a quality that can be used for purposes such as agriculture, golf courses, parks, industrial cooling, or maintenance of wildlife areas.


arizonaexperience.org...



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 03:31 PM
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a reply to: BuzzyWigs

What is really mindboggling about this is not that they are painting it green, it is that they feel the need to waste time and money on doing so when in fact the country golf originated from is hardly a picture of perfect greens and fairways, it iss god awful the conditions they play golf in over there and yet look how popular the game became, of course it is only for fat rich bald white men but what the heck paint it green what do I care!



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 03:36 PM
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originally posted by: misskat1
Does anyone remember the last drought, when people started spray painting their dead grass green?


They should take a page from a combination of Arizona and Japanese zen gardening and it should become the new rage for rock garden lawns. Far more eco-friendly. Especially in droughts. Instead of mowing, their immigrant lawn crews could be paid to do the raking.



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 03:40 PM
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a reply to: BuzzyWigs

Let's see how "Brown" they remain when the wealthier clientele start moving to greener pastures.
edit on 5/18/2015 by PsychoEmperor because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 03:54 PM
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originally posted by: soulpowertothendegree
What is really mindboggling about this is not that they are painting it green, it is that they feel the need to waste time and money on doing so when in fact the country golf originated from is hardly a picture of perfect greens and fairways, it iss god awful the conditions they play golf in over there

Yes, wasn't the Scottish form of the game developed among the sand-dunes?
A great test of skill in its own right.



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 04:00 PM
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On a small scale water consumers can do things like use gray water from their laundry to flush toilets.
California went through drought years before in the 70's but the population was half what it is now.
Apparently there just is not enough snow pack melt to supply the west in drought years.
There is no limitless Lake Gatun to gravity feed, lake Mead is dry and so are the underground aquifers.
Maybe engineers can build a solar powered desalination plant or the worlds largest reverse osmosis dam and we will have an eighth wonder of the world?

edit on 18-5-2015 by Cauliflower because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 04:06 PM
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Not a golfer. Couldn't they use something like astroturf?



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: misskat1


Does anyone remember the last drought, when people started spray painting their dead grass green?

Ugh.
Yeah - I mean ..... is it THAT important to have a "green" lawn? When you live in the effing DESERT?

EDIT: grammar
but also to amend the OP: Not "regulars" who said 25 overall cut....but regulators.

edit on 5/18/2015 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 06:16 PM
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a reply to: VictorVonDoom


Not a golfer. Couldn't they use something like astroturf?

I considered that option, too, while thinking about this.
But astroturf has a HUGE carbon footprint....
I say they should just play on the native ground they have.

Or possibly use "repurposed" carpeting from now-vacant buildings......instead of just tossing carpeting and whatever they call the foam cushion beneath it......carpet padding, I guess. But then, that would ALSO be bad for the ecosystem.

(Ever seen Idiocracy?)



edit on 5/18/2015 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 06:19 PM
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a reply to: Cauliflower


Maybe engineers can build a solar powered desalination plant or the worlds largest reverse osmosis dam and we will have an eighth wonder of the world?

Maybe? Yes - they can. It just takes dedication, investment, and science.
There has been desalination for CENTURIES (that's where "sea salt" on your grocer's shelves comes from). It's a "cottage industry" in New England (or at least it was a couple or 8 years ago.)
We must ABSOLUTELY learn how to use solar, wind, gravity, etc instead of relying on fossil fuel [non]sustenance.


New Desalination Technologies
Spur Growth in Recycling Water

Desalination has long been associated with one process — turning seawater into drinking water. But a host of new technologies are being developed that not only are improving traditional desalination but opening up new frontiers in reusing everything from agricultural water to industrial effluent.
by cheryl katz

A ferry plows along San Francisco Bay, trailing a tail of churned up salt, sand, and sludge and further fouling the already murky liquid that John Webley intends to turn into drinking water. But Webley, CEO of a Bay Area start-up working on a new, energy-skimping desalination system, isn’t perturbed.


It's not a "new idea" - it's one we Baby Boomers have been familiar with for decades.
I just hope it takes off.



edit on 5/18/2015 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 06:32 PM
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a reply to: PsychoEmperor


Let's see how "Brown" they remain when the wealthier clientele start moving to greener pastures.

Not sure, but ---- do you mean that as soon as the golfers leave the area because of this that the golf courses will resume wasting water?

I don't think so.
The situation is too dire.

But, as per usual, I'm probably wrong. I have an optimistic nature.


BTW, I LOVE your avatar.

edit on 5/18/2015 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 07:24 PM
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a reply to: PsychoEmperor

I heard that there are 18 holes because they would take a drink after each hole, and there are about 18 drinks in a bottle.



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 07:25 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

LOL!! Very possible. My ancestry is German, Finn, Scots, Irish, and English. We know how to drink.





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