It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

As Its Defence Priorities Shift, Japan Eyes The F-22 Raptor For Its Air Force

page: 1
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 22 2004 @ 06:46 PM
link   
Japan which is seeking to transform its military appears to be adding to its ability to project power. In addition to the JSF, they are also accepting thier KC-767 Tankers, are looking at the Global Hawk, and know some sources have indicated that they may be eyeing the Raptor as a posible future purchase. The Raptor would give the Japanese AF an awesum capacity and givien its advanced radar, it could provide a large measure of cruise missile defence for its islands. Ill bet they persue the new phased array radar for thier F-15J's to add anti cruise missile capacity to them as well. Since not everybody has a AWST subscription, I have posted the article in its entirety



Japan's five-year defense plan to include guidance system for a ballistic missile

Short-Range Punch

In an apparent break with a 52-year-old non-aggression policy, Japan's Defense Agency says it will begin work on a guidance system for a ballistic missile.

Built for Japan's army, the proposed missile is expected to have a range of 200-300 km. (125-188 mi.), making it only a tactical ballistic vehicle. As such, it would not pose much of a threat to its most prominent likely target, North Korea's Taepo-Dong missile sites.

But critics of the idea say the missile's range could be extended to 500-1,000 km. That's probable. Iran, for instance, recently flight tested an upgraded Shahab-3, extending its range 200-700 km. (AW&ST Nov. 29, p. 36).

Japan's longest-range missile is the Mitsubishi Type 88, with a range of just 60 km. It's the search for longer range and ballistic capability that has piqued critics. The agency's defense planners say a better strike capability is needed to defend Japan's remote islands. But that only prompts critics to ask, "Who's going to invade our remote islands?"

The JDA's guidance system proposal is part of the agency's general preparations for the next Five-Year Defense Buildup, which begins at the start of fiscal 2005 next Apr. 1.

The Japanese have traditionally opposed the possession of long-range weapons such as tanker aircraft or even long-range military transports. But the Taepo-Dong threat is changing that consensus. So far there has been little resistence to the missile development program.

The nation has accepted the Boeing 767 aerial tanker to extend the range of Japanese fighter aircraft. Earlier this year, Lockheed Martin representatives briefed JDA officials on the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. The information exchange was at an unclassified level and so far the Japanese government hasn't requested a more detailed, technical briefing. The F-35 won't be fielded until the beginning of the next decade, and early production slots will likely be reserved for the eight nations participating in its development.

The Japanese also have reportedly expressed interest in the Lockheed Martin F/A-22, but that aircraft would not be available for export for some years either. The intent is to replace a fleet of 84 McDonnell Douglas F-4EJs to provide both air interdiction and ground attack capabilities, the JDA says. In the meantime, they are considering upgrades to the air force's Boeing F-15J fleet.

The JDA's plans for a defense buildup are running into a budget crunch. Late last week, the Finance Ministry was expected to cut 900 billion yen ($882 million) from the JDA's 25-trillion-yen 2005-09 budget in order to find funding for a PAC-3 Patriot anti-ballistic missile defense system. The cuts are not quite as deep as anticipated (AW&ST Dec. 6, p. 30).

Although the JDA, acting as a front for the country's intelligence community, is interested in developing an indigenous endurance UAV, the program has suffered budget cuts that dim the financial prospects of an all-new aircraft. Tokyo has received several classified briefings on the U.S. Air Force's Global Hawk unmanned aircraft, which has similar characteristics to what the JDA seems to be interested in, U.S. officials note. Funding for a UAV is expected during the five-year budget cycle.

The air force is to add a refueling capability to its 16 C-130 transports. The combination of C-130s and the 767 tankers that are on order will form the basis of a tanker/transport air wing.

Japan also appears to be in the market for new reconnaissance satellites. Mitsubishi Electric built four--two optical and two radar--but one pair was lost in a November 2003 H-IIA launch failure. U.S. industry officials suggest the JDA may soon issue a request for a proposal. One option would be to buy a system from the growing U.S. commercial space industry, as long as the seller would team with a Japanese partner who would serve as prime contractor.

An initial JDA request for an optical spacecraft is expected to seek a .25-meter (0.82-ft.) resolution system. Underpinning any such contract would have to be an agreement between the U.S. and Japanese government. Industry officials believe Washington would endorse Japan's efforts, in large part because the countries' collective efforts would concentrate on North Korea.

However, the JDA and Japanese industry declined to comment on the issue.
AWST Japan





posted on Dec, 22 2004 @ 06:55 PM
link   
I'll read it later but I, as well as many others I know have been expecting this for some time. This would give them an unrivaled air dominance edge in that region is purchased in respectable numbers. It seems like a more logical choice then building more F-15J/DJs and the F-2 (A2A & A2G) wasn’t designed to perform on the level of even a Blk50 F-16 and is probably now out of production...



posted on Dec, 22 2004 @ 07:08 PM
link   
Its going to boil down to money. If Japan purchases them is squadron numbers, it may allow the USAF to get a few more. But compared to the F-15 its a 2 to 1 disadvantage in sheer numbers, but the plane will offer so much more. I hope that they go for it.



posted on Dec, 22 2004 @ 07:10 PM
link   
I think this is all part of a larger picture, FredT.
That picture being that China is a growing threat to the stability of the Asia-Pacific region.


TOKYO: A Japan-US security statement to be released next year will single out China and North Korea as sources of instability and provide for closer military cooperation between Tokyo and Washington against threats in the Asia-Pacific region, a Japanese newspaper said on Wednesday.

The report by the Nihon Keizai Shimbun newspaper coincides with growing concern in Japan about China’s military build-up and North Korea’s missile and nuclear programmes.

‘Japan-US security statement to point to China’

Also this month was: Japan and U.S. sign missile accord

The Taiwan situation is not helping either. As such, it is the growing threat posed by China in this region that has the U.S. helping Japan to re-emerge as a 'force' to be unnoticed by China in the same region. The sale of the F-22 indicates this, but also indicates the seriousness of the relationship that the Japan and the U.S. have. The sale of the F-22 abroad is very very limited in the export scope, at least as it stands now. For Japan to be allowed to buy them, says a bunch.





seekerof



posted on Dec, 22 2004 @ 07:11 PM
link   
Can Japan afford the Raptor? Sure they have a strong economy even if it has faltered over the last decade or so but I meant does their constitution allow them spend so much on weapons?

Assuming thay can what would represent a reasonable purchase for the JASDF? Maybe 60? Thats still $15billion without any spares or service support. Ouch!

Interesting to see the mention of force projection and Japan in the same sentence. Does that mean we have now forgiven them for 1941?

That may seem a facile question but consider that even now Germany is not exactly encouraged to take part in things like the Gulf War. There is still a surprising amount of resistance to the thought of seeing German bombers flying over other countries.



posted on Dec, 22 2004 @ 07:19 PM
link   

Originally posted by Seekerof
The sale of the F-22 abroad is very very limited in the export scope, at least as it stands now. For Japan to be allowed to buy them, says a bunch.
seekerof


Well put seekerof, I can only think of 2 other countries that would be allowed to purchase it, Isreal and the U.K. (I doubt though that either could afford it though) and Australia has an outside but slim shot.

You are correct, I think it sends NK and China a clear message that the U.S. will not allow either country to exert unrestricted infuence over the area.



posted on Dec, 22 2004 @ 07:27 PM
link   
D@mn the Japanese would be powerful if they had F-22s. Japan's GNP is pretty high but I don't know if their defense budget is high enough. This is probably a message to N. Korea and China. It appears that Japan plans on ruling the skies if they can't own the sea's anymore. I remember Isreal saying that they won't buy F-22's because of the cost but I don't know if the F-22 is avalible for export.



posted on Dec, 22 2004 @ 09:39 PM
link   
It would be toned down a bit, the USA would not want to sell its best things overseas, so that they could win if that country went to war with them. I doubt Japan can get its hands on a F-22.



posted on Dec, 22 2004 @ 09:53 PM
link   
I also doubt Japan getting F-22s in the near future. Unless of course the North Korea situation escalates. Anyhow I definatly can't see Japan going to war with the US. We have an economic realationship like the one we have with China.



posted on Dec, 22 2004 @ 11:34 PM
link   

Originally posted by W4rl0rD
It would be toned down a bit, the USA would not want to sell its best things overseas, so that they could win if that country went to war with them. I doubt Japan can get its hands on a F-22.



Well, considering we wont be going to war with Japan and seeing that they are a growing and vital allies to the U.S. in that region I don’t think we will slack on their F/A-22s. Besides, if they need to they can modify it to their likings. They surely have the technology to do so...



posted on Dec, 23 2004 @ 12:16 AM
link   
considering japans current economic condition... is it in their best interests to spash out on defence spending?

China has no interest in conflict with Japan with only North Korea could be deemed a near-future threat.

But North Korea has been a near-future threat for 50 years... so what's new?



posted on Dec, 23 2004 @ 01:39 AM
link   

Lucretius
considering japans current economic condition... is it in their best interests to spash out on defence spending?

I think there trying to go for "The best Defense is a good Offense" strategy.


Lucretius
But North Korea has been a near-future threat for 50 years... so what's new?

Their nuclear capabilities and missiles ranges.


I dont think Japan will be offered the Raptor, not to mention its high costs.
IF, we do offer it to them, it would be tunned down a bit, just like the JSF.



posted on Dec, 23 2004 @ 02:28 AM
link   
I don't know ML, I think the USAF would push for it if japan was willing because it would stretch out the production line and may effect unit cost.



posted on Dec, 23 2004 @ 02:28 AM
link   

Originally posted by Lucretius
considering japans current economic condition... is it in their best interests to spash out on defence spending?


Yes it is, alot of the military build up involves work share with most going to Japanese companies. It will prime the pump for thier economy.



posted on Dec, 23 2004 @ 02:29 AM
link   
isn't the JSF made for each countries own specification anyhow?

I know that is the case with the UK variant... although I also know the UK has a large share of the development as well

North korea has had missiles that could hit japan for over a decade, though only now can they kit them out with a nuclear bomb.



posted on Dec, 23 2004 @ 02:35 AM
link   

Originally posted by Lucretius
isn't the JSF made for each countries own specification anyhow?
I know that is the case with the UK variant... although I also know the UK has a large share of the development as well


I don't think so. There may be some variations on the avionics, but the basic structure will remain the same. The U.K is the biggest partner in the project so they have participated in flight test as well as design of the plane.



posted on Dec, 23 2004 @ 02:44 AM
link   

Thursday, July 11, 2002 - Turkey today (July 11) became the seventh international partner to sign up for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program, joining the United Kingdom, Italy, the Netherlands, Canada, Denmark and Norway. Australia also has announced its intention to participate.

Lockheed Martin is the prime contractor to develop the F-35 JSF for the armed forces of those nations, as well as for the United States Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps. Turkey and the other countries participating in the F-35's decade-long System Development and Demonstration (SDD) phase will have the opportunity to develop and supply parts and systems, influence the aircraft's design and place representatives in the government's JSF Program Office.

"We already have an excellent, long-term working relationship with both the Turkish government and the aerospace industries of Turkey, thanks to our mutual work on the F-16 program," said Tom Burbage, Lockheed Martin executive vice president and general manager of the F-35 JSF program. "We're excited to be able to continue that association with the F-35. It's very inspiring to have Turkey on the team."

Over the life of the program's SDD phase, Turkey will contribute approximately $175 million to the F-35's development.

The next-generation F-35 is a stealthy, supersonic multirole fighter designed to meet the U.S. government's requirements for a new generation of transformational weapons. The single-engine JSF will be manufactured in three versions: a conventional-takeoff-and-landing (CTOL) variant for the U.S. Air Force, an aircraft-carrier version (CV) for the U.S. Navy, and a short-takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) version for the U.S. Marine Corps.

The cornerstone of the F-35 is affordability, achieved in large part through a very high level of common parts and systems across the three versions of the aircraft.

The F-35 is designed to replace aging fighter inventories, including U.S. Air Force A-10s and F-16s, U.S. Navy F/A-18s, U.S. Marine Corps AV-8B Harriers and F/A-18s, and United Kingdom Harrier GR.7s and Sea Harriers.

Lockheed Martin is developing the F-35 in conjunction with its principal partners, Northrop Grumman and BAE SYSTEMS. Pratt & Whitney and General Electric are developing two separate but interchangeable propulsion systems.

The JSF X-35 demonstrator aircraft completed a highly successful flight-test program in August 2001, and the U.S. government awarded the JSF development contract to Lockheed Martin the following October.


www.f-16.net...

Japan does not appear on the list of customers



posted on Dec, 23 2004 @ 02:52 AM
link   
According to the article, Japan has been briefed in to the non classified aspects of the JSF. They would if they ordered it (and the will) just have to get in line like everybody else to get thier planes.



posted on Dec, 23 2004 @ 07:28 AM
link   

Originally posted by FredT
According to the article, Japan has been briefed in to the non classified aspects of the JSF. They would if they ordered it (and the will) just have to get in line like everybody else to get thier planes.


I bet that they will get the license to manufacture them in Japan, kind of like they did whenever they received permission to make indigenous versions of the Western fighters (ie F-104, F-4, F-15, etc.).

Who knows, they might even be able to make them faster over there?



posted on Dec, 23 2004 @ 01:33 PM
link   
The F-022 has technology in it no one has seen before; if they outsource it, they aren't gonna provide all that advanced avionics tech to a country like Japan. The gov't isn't that stupid. But the aircraft would be very good still with more current avionics for a country like Japan, to help balance power in the region I suppose.



new topics

top topics



 
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join