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Scientists discover whole new state of matter

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posted on May, 15 2015 @ 11:08 PM
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A new state of matter has been discovered..........? Say it ain't so, ATS...Actually, it is so and it's called jahn-Teller Metals; metals which are known to be able to super-conduct at higher temps. This is important because traditionally, Super conductors need extremely cold temperatures to work correctly. This new tech could really change how things are in the manufacturing sector.



Most people are familiar with some of the common states of matter: solids, liquids and gases. Scientists also recognize a fourth state of matter — plasma — that is commonly observable here on Earth, as well as a host of other states that can only be created in the lab, such as Bose–Einstein condensates and neutron-degenerate matter. Jahn-Teller metals can now be added to this list, a state which appears to have the properties of an insulator, superconductor, metal and magnet all wrapped into one.

It's the material's superconductivity which might be the most interesting trait, however. It has the potential to achieve superconductivity at a relatively high critical temperature ("high" as in -135 degrees Celsius as opposed to the sub -243.2 degrees Celsius required by many ordinary metallic superconductors), which is significant for the science of superconductivity. Superconductors conduct electricity without resistance, so they have the potential to revolutionize how we use and produce energy. But these technologies become far more feasible if developed using high-temperature superconductivity.


What says ATS?

www.mnn.com...
edit on 15-5-2015 by lostbook because: word add




posted on May, 15 2015 @ 11:23 PM
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I have always wondered what kind of near term applications could arise from even regular superconductors in the frigid space environment. It seems that the energy it takes to make the material superconductive might be readily available i the ambient environment.

And the electrical potential seen in the extreme reaches of our atmosphere, where we typically orbit....

Interesting article. I suppose those higher temperatures make it more cost effective to do research. Its still gonna pretty expensive, though.



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 11:30 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

I don't know if it could be applicable, but if a microprocessor was designed with this I would think it would be blazing fast.

I am always trying to keep my rig cool, but that would change many things.

Scratch that. I see they are still talking about it being high" as in -135 c". That is still pretty cold.
edit on 15-5-2015 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 11:33 PM
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Interesting, but is this teller dude from the jpl? I wonder.
a reply to: lostbook



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 11:33 PM
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Interesting, but is this teller dude from the jpl? I wonder.
a reply to: lostbook



posted on May, 16 2015 @ 10:01 AM
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a reply to: Nochzwei

I don't know.



posted on May, 16 2015 @ 10:08 AM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
I have always wondered what kind of near term applications could arise from even regular superconductors in the frigid space environment. It seems that the energy it takes to make the material superconductive might be readily available i the ambient environment.

And the electrical potential seen in the extreme reaches of our atmosphere, where we typically orbit....

Interesting article. I suppose those higher temperatures make it more cost effective to do research. Its still gonna pretty expensive, though.


Pretty cool, huh? The applications which could arise from something like this would be game changing. Super-conductive magnets that can power themselves is what I see coming from this which, relatively, don't need to be as cold as present super-conductors. It will really come in handy for Space technologies.
edit on 16-5-2015 by lostbook because: word add



posted on May, 16 2015 @ 10:10 AM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
I have always wondered what kind of near term applications could arise from even regular superconductors in the frigid space environment. It seems that the energy it takes to make the material superconductive might be readily available i the ambient environment.

And the electrical potential seen in the extreme reaches of our atmosphere, where we typically orbit....

Interesting article. I suppose those higher temperatures make it more cost effective to do research. Its still gonna pretty expensive, though.

It's not quite the same thing, I would reckon.

In space, an issue is ridding a mass of heat; space may be cold, but little is there to conduct/convect heat away from an object. Think of how a Thermos works: it simply uses a partial vacuum between the inner and outer layers to insulate the interior. Some thermal energy is conducted where the two meet at the neck, which makes it a good but imperfect insulator.

However, that flaw doesn't exist in space, so thermal changes are even slower; heat is radiated, but this happens very slowly. I would think a superconductor would heat up while being used, thus losing the advantage of operating in the cold of space rather quickly and only slowly able to disperse heat away.
edit on 10Sat, 16 May 2015 10:14:43 -0500America/ChicagovAmerica/Chicago5 by Greven because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2015 @ 03:51 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

Cool stuff, to be certain! I wonder what sort of practical applications this could have, and what sort of problems it could cause if used.

Overall, thus just shows that things aren't nearly as set in stone as people might think, and the world is a far stranger place than is known!



posted on May, 16 2015 @ 05:13 PM
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a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

I'm thinking as a connective metal in computer Chips....


It almost the holy grail for micro computing...I wonder how much it costs to produce...

Imagine a computer that likes running hot, and performs better....the heat generated could be recycled as energy instead of blown off as with a fan.

The magnetic properties would be beneficial as well if a decent gate can be made.

Cheers!

Neat news..



posted on May, 16 2015 @ 09:34 PM
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a reply to: Treespeaker

As long as they could do it without baking our laps, that could be pretty handy!

Magnetic properties and gates? You have me curious.



posted on May, 17 2015 @ 05:35 PM
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