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Did the Collider cause the earthquakes in Nepal

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posted on May, 15 2015 @ 03:28 PM
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I came across this on my Facebook News Feed.
Now, I am probally at a pre-school level of understanding when it comes to this level of science, and the reason for this thread is for you guys to help me understand if there could possibly be a link and would it be worth a lot of my time to get to understand more.
There has to be more to the Collider experiments than what we are lead to believe....or maybe not?
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posted on May, 15 2015 @ 03:36 PM
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a reply to: chelsealad

No idea...interesting and fun theory for connection but what impressed me was the "In the case of the LHC the “beam energy” needing to be absorbed in one, single instance equates to right around 4 Terrawatts. A little more than ¼ of our whole world’s energy usage is dumped at one time into an underground vault. "

Man that is a lot of energy...only if we could harness it somehow. I had no idea that much was being produced...I still don't even know if that is true or not it seems so amazing to me. I'm sure people will be watching it much more now.



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: chelsealad

The energy of the CERN's collision is roughly equal to the energy of 13 mosquitoes in flight.

So, long answer made short, no.

The CERN's operation is not the cause of the earthquakes of Nepal, nor of any earthquakes in the world for that matters.




edit on 15-5-2015 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 03:44 PM
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a reply to: swanne

Could you please elaborate or inclose a link for me to read up on, as from 4 TW to not even enough energy to blow out a candle is quite a difference. Please dont take that the wrong way it is purely for me to find out more.



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 03:44 PM
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I do not know but it was up and running at the time of the Japan tsunami and volcanoes also seem to be more active when it is on.



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 03:48 PM
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Actually very a very small amount of energy is produced
1 TeV: 1.602×10−7 (that is 10 to the -7 power) even though that is a trillion electron volts that means exactly that , electron volts
1st run = app 4 TeV or about the energy of 1 mosquito in flight
2nd run = app 6TeV or just a bit more than the 1st run.

It takes an amazing amount of energy to power the gigantic magnets within the LHC. These magnets keep the particles on track in the loop until the impact.Could this have an effect on geology ? I am not a geologist but I would say if anything only local.



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 03:50 PM
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People fear this machine way out of proportion to its danger, which is none, unless it falls on your foot.



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 03:57 PM
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originally posted by: chelsealad
Could you please elaborate or inclose a link for me to read up on

Of course.

Here we go:


The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is scheduled to restart for physics early in 2015 after two years of maintenance and upgrading. The collision energy at restart will be 13 TeV

home.web.cern.ch...


1 TeV is about the energy of motion of a flying mosquito.

lhc-machine-outreach.web.cern.ch...

The collider itself requires almost 1.3 TW/h to run, but this energy is employed to activate the magnets in the ring (thery are electromagnets) so that these can in turn accelerate the particle inside the ring at near the speed of light (the nearer to the speed of light you get, the more energy it requires). The collider is a bit like a very large motor, and the output is the particle's acceleration, whose total energy (due to its ridiculously small size) only reaches the range of TeVs.



edit on 15-5-2015 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 03:58 PM
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a reply to: Aleister
Or , if you are extremely close and have braces or a metal belt buckle. That would be just too gross to imagine.



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 04:05 PM
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a reply to: swanne

Thank you. So, the collision energy is equal to that of the mosquito which would explain, partially, why we havent all been sucked into a black hole. The power it takes to run the electromagnets is in TW and as it's only used to power the thing then it would be like turning off a light switch and there would be no "dumping" of excess energy.
Coincidence it is then.



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 04:07 PM
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a reply to: Gothmog

Just like the scene in Terminator 3.



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 04:09 PM
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a reply to: chelsealad

Correct on the whole line!


BTW nice avatar.



edit on 15-5-2015 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 04:16 PM
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No. While Earthquakes may or not be predictable due to minor changes in the magnetic field (still highly contentious hypothesis). The LHC is nowhere near powerful enough to have any influence on it at that distance or even locally, if it did then Europe would be dust by now.

For instance your standard MRI scanner generates a magnetic field around 40,000 times larger than he Earths magnetic field with no ill effects on the surrounding area.

Good on you for answering the question though, knowledge is power.
edit on 15-5-2015 by bastion because: (no reason given)



originally posted by: Gothmog
a reply to: Aleister
Or , if you are extremely close and have braces or a metal belt buckle. That would be just too gross to imagine.



Have friends who perform MRIs, they've found a lot of interesting things in war vets the patients had no idea about, luckily they were mainly found before the scans.
edit on 15-5-2015 by bastion because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: chelsealad

No, it has nothing to do with it... That area of the world has two massive tectonic plates crashing into each other - hence the himilayas... Everest lost a bit of height due to that quake. I'd be more inclined to look elsewhere for the cause of that, e.g. Isostatic adjustment due to the weight of ice that has been lost from the Anctarctic and dispursed around the worlds oceans, or it could just be due to the normal traversal of the Earths crust.

In fact, I'm just going to blame HAARP and/or Aliens.



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 05:08 PM
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If the LHC had the capability to generate earthquakes, there should have been hundreds of earthquakes in Europe. There's more correlation between large Earthquakes between different continents due to the way that shock waves are refracted through the mantle and core. There's also the capacitance effect of rock that allows electric currents to travel through and build up as well as the way that ground water can allow fault lines to slip rather than store up the stress.



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 05:10 PM
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originally posted by: chelsealad
I came across this on my Facebook News Feed.
Now, I am probally at a pre-school level of understanding when it comes to this level of science, and the reason for this thread is for you guys to help me understand if there could possibly be a link and would it be worth a lot of my time to get to understand more.
There has to be more to the Collider experiments than what we are lead to believe....or maybe not?
link

No one knows what the LHC can do. Not even the people running it. So, it is possible. You will see people on this board saying 'it does not do this and can't do this'. I am wondering where their inside information is coming from as the operators of the LHC have had results they didn't expect.



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 05:42 PM
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None of us civilians have nearly enough data, knowledge or idea of what the CERN techno-bauble really is, really can do, or why in fact it was so damned important that they spent so much effort and cash to fabricate it. Man is certainly credited with the ability to create earthquake, at least according to the USGS:

www.usgs.gov...

So who really knows. I have always been skeptical of modern science and it
s objectives since the Manhattan Project and the glorious gift that THAT presented to the planet so I wonder as the OP does as to the possibility especially after watching the Dutchscense video. Food for discussion no doubt.



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 06:21 PM
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originally posted by: Aleister
People fear this machine way out of proportion to its danger, which is none, unless it falls on your foot.


I disagree, when humans are dealing with complete unknowns but are certainly aware of the fact that there are dangers we should also be concerned. There are many things that could happen and the fact that it is all very experimental is the thing to be aware of.
Remember the testing that was done when the bomb was created? if we knew then what we know now, much of the conditions and testing would never have been done, it was extremely dangerous to the public and yet we were told everything was fine.
The same is true of germ warfare experiments that were NOt "completely safe".

We don't even understand the nature of our reality so how do we know what may damage it? They talk about minimal risk and percentages, but you can't figure that without knowing a whole lot more about everything than they do. I doubt many who did worry in the science would would speak up any more than they did with the Manhattan Project.



A blinding flash visible for 200 miles lit up the morning sky. A mushroom cloud reached 40,000 feet, blowing out windows of civilian homes up to 100 miles away. When the cloud returned to earth it created a half-mile wide crater metamorphosing sand into glass. A bogus cover-up story was quickly released, explaining that a huge ammunition dump had just exploded in the desert.

www.ushistory.org...


A few examples of possibility.


Strangelets are small fragments of strange matter—a hypothetical form of quark matter—that contain roughly equal numbers of up, down, and strange quarks and that are more stable than ordinary nuclei (strangelets would range in size from a few femtometers to a few meters across).[3] If strangelets can actually exist, and if they were produced at the LHC, they could conceivably initiate a runaway fusion process in which all the nuclei in the planet would be converted to strange matter, similar to a strange star.[3]




On 10 August 2008, Rainer Plaga, a German astrophysicist, posted a research paper on the arXiv Web archive concluding that LHC safety studies have not definitely ruled out the potential catastrophic threat from microscopic black holes, including the possible danger from Hawking radiation emitted by black holes




Otto Rössler, a German chemistry professor at the University of Tübingen, argues that micro black holes created in the LHC could grow exponentially

edit on 15-5-2015 by Char-Lee because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 06:38 PM
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a reply to: chelsealad

What a great topic!
Before the quacks are done they will be the cause brings that
brings this fragile, tech based world society right back to the
stone age. They will bring it all down crashing on their heads.
And if that's all that happens? It will be a stoke of luck.
Just my opinion, but the timing of the earthquake and Cern.
Is not a coincidence, it's a warning.

SnF


edit on Rpm51515v40201500000021 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 07:42 PM
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Char-Lee

Germany, Japan, USA, UK, Canada, USSR

These are the countries that during WW2 were working on making an Atom Bomb.


For the record Chemist know little or nothing about physics.

Strange quarks are actually contained within the particles of atoms which is actually very cool but not in relation to the topic.

That other quote is absurd.

Links please????

Any thoughts?


edit on 15-5-2015 by Kashai because: Added content




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